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GRNW Meet-Up 2013 > GRNW Meet-Up - Panel Topics

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message 1: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
As we get closer to the Sept. 14 Meet-Up in Seattle, we'll be putting together our guest panels, including picking topics to discuss.

But we'd like to hear what you're interested in discussing.

What questions do you want to ask our panelists? What things do you want to explore related to the M/M genre?

Are you interested in focusing on subgenres? (Paranormal vs Historical vs Contemporary vs BDSM! Who will be the VICTOR?)

Is your preference related to publishing or writing M/M? How to break into the industry? Is the quality of M/M writing really "falling" or is that a misconception?

Do you prefer asking authors specific questions about their books or future projects? (e.g. Do you want to ask Andrea Speed about the effects of her super onion power?)

Do you want to talk about sexy things? Is there too much sex in m/m books? Not enough sex? How to write erotica?

Do you want the big questions? How is M/M evolving? Is it really "blowing up" or will it remain very niche? How are authors surfing the changes in the industry and the genre? Is gay romance or M/M romance a part of LGBT fiction? Should it be more connected? Should it be more separate?

We want the GRNW Meet-Up to focus on what the attendees want to talk about. So, what do you think? What do you want to discuss?


message 2: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments I guess if I were actually on a panel I would want to talk about anything so long as I could make it funny.


message 3: by Andrea (new)

Andrea (andreaspeed) | 49 comments I would just ramble and break into my comedy routine. Keep in mind I can never be trusted with any kind of forum.


message 4: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Amazon's announcement to solicit and publish fanfic for approved TV shows/movies might be one interesting topic. Will it have impact on the M/M genre? (Or will it be driving in a parallel lane since it's smut-free?)

I also wonder if their initiative will even skew towards non-canon slash. I suppose it will depend on the owner of the copyright and how friendly they are to alternative pairings...


message 5: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Another possible topic: The big publishes and MM. JR Ward's Lover at Last came out this year, and now the online original fiction series Captive Prince was just purchased by Penguin, who will release all three books. Will other M/M books be next? http://freece.livejournal.com/61483.html


message 6: by Tara (new)

Tara Spears | 55 comments I think this is a very good topic! Both Hatchett and Simon and Schuster sent offers for Trey Grey, however I opted to self pub due to the restraints put forth in both contracts. There might be authors interested in the differences between the big houses and the specialty publishers like Riptide and Dreamspinner, not to mention about 15 others.


message 7: by Laylah Hunter (new)

Laylah Hunter | 4 comments Tara wrote: "I think this is a very good topic! Both Hatchett and Simon and Schuster sent offers for Trey Grey, however I opted to self pub due to the restraints put forth in both contracts. There might be auth..."

Yeah, count me in as definitely interested here! It would be really interesting (and probably helpful) to have some discussion on what to expect from different kinds of publishers.


Kelly H. (Maybedog) (maybedog) | 32 comments I'll listen to anything they all have to say. I also need to know which of Andrea's amazing stories I can read without sobbing for the next three days. (view spoiler)


message 9: by Andrea (new)

Andrea (andreaspeed) | 49 comments Aww! But ... there's some fun stuff in the later Infected books! (Have you tried my Josh of the Damned series?)


message 10: by Tara (new)

Tara Spears | 55 comments THAT right there is why I have not read anything you have written yet, Andrea! I keep hearing they make people cry. I will before the meet-up though.


message 11: by Andrea (new)

Andrea (andreaspeed) | 49 comments I think there's one book in particular that makes people cry. (That would be Infected: Bloodlines, which I seem to apologize for all the time.) But the rest of my stuff won't make you cry, I promise!


Kelly H. (Maybedog) (maybedog) | 32 comments You don't have anything to apologize for, Andrea. One of the most popular stories right now, Let's Hear it for the Boy, is terrible sad and it's supposedly amazing. Your work is excellent, I'm just a complete wuss.

It's a mark of your great talent that you can make people feel so strongly. The book I had trouble with was (view spoiler) That's good writing: you made me care so much I can't read further because my heart will break. I was seriously upset for days, the book affected me that much.

So I don't think you should ever apologize for your writing, no matter how sad a book is. You've got mad skillz. :)

I have Josh of the Damned on my short list. I'll have it read before the conference.

I will read the whole infected series at some point. I LOVED Prey. I just have to steel myself up first. :)


message 13: by Paul (new)

Paul | 30 comments Andrea wrote: "I think there's one book in particular that makes people cry. (That would be Infected: Bloodlines, which I seem to apologize for all the time.) But the rest of my stuff won't make you cry, I promise!"

Never apologize! I'm in the middle of Prey and after getting into it, I'm loving it. Books that make me feel are always my favorites. Besides, there's nothing wrong with a good cry :)


message 14: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments Hey ttg,

I was just over on the University Bookstore reading thread. There was a question about whether the authors would read explicit material. I said I thought they would not, because that would be really tacky for the venue.

But then I got to thinking--in a different venue, explicit material "poetry slam" stlye might be really sort of fun--like a venue that served liquor, for example.

Just throwing that idea out there.


message 15: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "Hey ttg,

I was just over on the University Bookstore reading thread. There was a question about whether the authors would read explicit material. I said I thought they would not, because that wou..."


Hmmmm....I agree that I don't think the U Bookstore reading is for Extreme sexy times. (It's open and public, so probably not the best venue.)

I like where you're going with the "special venue" idea though. We're still fundraising for the Happy Hour event, but that might be the place to do it. People could sign up for "five minutes in heaven" readings or what not and read their fave (or their least fave) sexy scenes. Hmmm....


message 16: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments ttg wrote: "Nicole wrote: "Hey ttg,

I was just over on the University Bookstore reading thread. There was a question about whether the authors would read explicit material. I said I thought they would not, b..."


5 Minutes of Heaven! Love the name.


message 17: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "5 Minutes of Heaven! Love the name."

Heh! Yeah, we could have writers sign up to read, maybe their favorite sex scene, or the smuttiest, their "first time." Could be fun!

Still raising funds though. We'll see what we can do. :)


message 18: by Mountie (new)

Mountie I'd be so into that. I think it should be open to readers too. Let us read our favourite sex scenes too. Love the idea of doing it in a poetry slam style at a place we can get liquored up. :-)


message 19: by Mountie (new)

Mountie I would love to talk about how much readers feedback effects / shapes the writer's writing. For story themes chosen, sexual explicitness, and reviews of previous works.

I'd also like to discuss for us readers writing a constructive review. On Goodreads we all have the ability to say what we want but I'd like to know what is considered to be a useful review from a readers perspective and from a writers perspective.


message 20: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Mountie wrote: "I would love to talk about how much readers feedback effects / shapes the writer's writing. For story themes chosen, sexual explicitness, and reviews of previous works.

I'd also like to discuss f..."


Ooooh, great ideas, Mountie. I think both reader feedback and the nature and utility of reviews (for both writers and readers) are rich topics for discussion.


message 21: by Andrea (new)

Andrea (andreaspeed) | 49 comments Can we curse at the reading? This may be important for me. I can't really participate in sexy time - ha ha! - but if we need someone to add cursing or violence, I'll be in the back, randomly spouting things like a Tourette's sufferer on a particularly bad case of bath salts.


message 22: by Paul (new)

Paul | 30 comments ROFLMAO!! Oh Jeebus, I needed a good laugh today, thank you Andrea :)


message 23: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Andrea wrote: "Can we curse at the reading? This may be important for me. I can't really participate in sexy time - ha ha! - but if we need someone to add cursing or violence, I'll be in the back, randomly spouti..."

For which reading? For your Sept. 13 reading, I think some cursing is fine.

If we're able to swing the "Five Minutes in Heaven" reading at the Happy Hour, I think probably the theme is just "Over the Top" and fun, so like something hilarious, or super sexy, or early writing that someone is sheepish about, or something very over-the-top, etc. I think the hard limits on that one would be something dark or very violent or non-con. That probably wouldn't work well for the HH.


message 24: by Andrea (new)

Andrea (andreaspeed) | 49 comments Fair enough. If hilarious is a potential category, I might have something. I might. My sense of humor skews dark, so I don't know if anybody else would find it hilarious ... but I can hope.


message 25: by Mountie (new)

Mountie There are many of us dark humerous people out there Andrea. You may be surprised.


message 26: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments ttg wrote: "I think the hard limits on that one would be something dark or very violent or non-con. "

Yeah, cause we want the bartender to keep giving us drinks without calling in an FBI profiler. :)


message 27: by Andrea (new)

Andrea (andreaspeed) | 49 comments Thanks Mountie, that does make me feel better. Or at least a little less "crazy lady cursing in the corner of the room" like.

And I hate to say it, Nicole, but if the FBI aren't already having me tailed ... I think a lot of people would be surprised.


message 28: by Tara (new)

Tara Spears | 55 comments ttg wrote: "Nicole wrote: "Hey ttg,

I was just over on the University Bookstore reading thread. There was a question about whether the authors would read explicit material. I said I thought they would not, b..."


Oh God... I cannot read my own smutty writing aloud without sweating. Think I have to count myself out of that one!


message 29: by Tara (new)

Tara Spears | 55 comments Mountie wrote: "I would love to talk about how much readers feedback effects / shapes the writer's writing. For story themes chosen, sexual explicitness, and reviews of previous works.

I'd also like to discuss f..."


Now this I can get into. I wrote Trey because of a dare put to me by Joe Hill and Dean Koontz at a con. Doing so opened my mind and made me a better writer. Now my 76 year old mom may not agree but eh... However she did want to use one of the untouched cover pics for her desktop!


message 30: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments Andrea wrote: "And I hate to say it, Nicole, but if the FBI aren't already having me tailed ... I think a lot of people would be surprised. "

LOL. Don't worry. We won't tip them off about our happy hour hijinx.


message 31: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
I'm not sure if this is a good panel topic, but see what you all think...

I feel like with the rise of e-publishing, we've also seen the rising of "multi-publishing" or to say plainly, authors having to publish multiple times a year.

For "factory" authors who seem to have a knack for publishing a book every three months, that's not too strange. (I'm thinking here of bestseller thriller authors who often "coauthor".) But now it also seems to be more the "norm" and expectation for more writers to produce more and keep their name in the ongoing dialogue. (Rather than before, where having a book once a year or longer was more than acceptable.)

What do you think about this push-to-publish more often? Is this just something for new authors trying to build a reputation and readership? Is this also a pressure on more established writers? Is this what publishing is now? (The expectation to publish whatever you can as much as possible--be it novella, short story, novel, etc?) And do you feel it's realistic to maintain quality while building quantity?


message 32: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments ttg wrote: "I'm not sure if this is a good panel topic, but see what you all think...

I feel like with the rise of e-publishing, we've also seen the rising of "multi-publishing" or to say plainly, authors hav..."


I think this would be an excellent topic, myself.


message 33: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "ttg wrote: "I'm not sure if this is a good panel topic, but see what you all think...

I feel like with the rise of e-publishing, we've also seen the rising of "multi-publishing" or to say plainly,..."


Thanks, Nicole! Maybe this is something we can ask both the editors and the authors...


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

Oh no...we can't read explicit material at the University Bookstore? 0.o

I guess I'll have to figure out a section of my books that's not explicit. >.0


message 35: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Daisy wrote: "Oh no...we can't read explicit material at the University Bookstore? 0.o

I guess I'll have to figure out a section of my books that's not explicit. >.0"


Heh! I'll check in with them, Daisy, and see how far we can go. :)

There's also the 5 Minutes in Heaven reading at the post-con Happy Hour. That can be as smexy as people want. Give a shout out if you're interested in participating in that. (Basically, it will be a series of 5 minute readings by different authors, with a focus on light, funny, or romantic.)


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Ooh, I'd love to do that! Thanks for asking. :)


message 37: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Daisy wrote: "Ooh, I'd love to do that! Thanks for asking. :)"

Cool beans! I have down on our reader list for the HH. :) Thanks for participating!


message 38: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Here's a possible panel topic: Do you find that gay romance or m/m is more generally accepted in the overall romance author/publisher community, or are there still remnants of push-back, confusion, or "that's not what we do"?

I'm curious. Is that a topic that's still relevant?


message 39: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments ttg wrote: "I'm curious. Is that a topic that's still relevant? "

Not sure. I think we may all have left traditional publishing behind so profoundly that we don't think about it anymore. (Could just be me though.)


message 40: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "ttg wrote: "I'm curious. Is that a topic that's still relevant? "

Not sure. I think we may all have left traditional publishing behind so profoundly that we don't think about it anymore. (Could ju..."


That's an interesting point. I wonder if/when the genre expands, if traditional publishing will come more on board, or if things will remain stratified.

I saw that the RWA Awards were going on and noticed there were no LGBT romance contenders. Are they not allowed? I find that odd: http://www.rwa.org/p/bl/et/blogid=20&...


message 41: by Anne (new)

Anne Tenino (annetenino) | 126 comments ttg wrote: "I saw that the RWA Awards were going on and noticed there were no LGBT romance contenders. Are they not allowed? I find that odd: http://www.rwa.org/p/bl/et/blogid=20&...... "

They are allowed, and a few years ago an LGBT book did very well (I think the author was Sloane Parker), but the process is very "old school" in a lot of ways. TBH, in terms of my own work, it's seemed pointless to enter because I felt an unacknowledged bias (they only recently allowed ebooks). I probably will for 2014, though.

The point is, RWA, like a lot of the "Big 6" publishers, seems slow to accept change. There's a lot of stubborn blindness about the future of publishing coming from that sector.

But as for the community of authors? I get a lot of support from my local RWA group, and I can count on one finger the number of times someone in it put up their nose at me. I've had more negative comments from the gay community than the romance author community.


message 42: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Thanks for the info, Anne. I'm glad that the process is open to LGBT options. (Although I wish there might have been one or two represented last night as a finalist.) I know RRW has the Rainbow awards, but it would be nice to have visibility at the main RWA awards. (You should definitely enter next year.)

I'm glad that from a chapter view, your chapter is supportive, open, and welcoming. That's awesome. :)

Your point about the slow transition of traditional "big 6" (now big 5?) publishing is a good one. In some ways, it's fascinating to watch them shift, but other ways, very frustrating.


message 43: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments ttg wrote: "Thanks for the info, Anne. I'm glad that the process is open to LGBT options. (Although I wish there might have been one or two represented last night as a finalist.) I know RRW has the Rainbow awa..."

Probably part of the problem has to do with logistics--do they just include lgbt in each category or do they make a separate category (like in DABWAHA) where all the m/m titles battle it out.

As an aside. I've never looked at the RITA ballot before. I think it's cool that the editors are listed along with the authors.


message 44: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "Probably part of the problem has to do with logistics--do they just include lgbt in each category or do they make a separate category (like in DABWAHA) where all the m/m titles battle it out."

Yeah, I agree. I think that's a big issue, and branches out into the genre in general. ("Is m/m sci-fi different from sci-fi?", gay mysteries vs. mysteries, etc.) Part of the "channeling" is making it easier for readers to find what they're looking for. (LGBT characters and relationships in genre fiction.) But then do we end up ghetto-izing ourselves too much and always being separate from "regular" sci-fi romance or mystery romance. It's a tough issue.

I'm just surprised that out of all the finalists nominated, there wasn't an LGBT candidate. Potential solutions would be:

1- The own category route--so "best LGBT romance" alongside best paranormal, contemporary, or YA

2- The "increase diversity" option, and have (at least) one spot in each category for the best representation of LGBT romance for that area (YA, historical, etc.)

On the other hand, maybe the solution is just separate awards, like the already-existing Rainbow awards or the Gaylactic Spectrum awards (for LGBT speculative fiction.)

It's a tough issue. (And you're right, it's great that they highlight editors, which is a very undervalued art.)


message 45: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 40 comments ttg wrote: "It's a tough issue. (And you're right, it's great that they highlight editors, which is a very undervalued art.) "

:)


message 46: by ttg (last edited Aug 02, 2013 12:33AM) (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
I talked with Damon Suede, head of the Rainbow Romance Writers, and he mentioned that with this year's RWA awards, there were only 16 LGBT submissions, and that if there is going to be an LGBT finalist, there needs to be more people willing to submit their stories. (He also mentioned there was a finalist with LGBT romance, but that it's not primarily LGBT, so isn't marketed that way, even by the author.)

I kind of felt like that was a challenge in a way. What would happen if TONS OF WRITERS submitted their stories? If there was a deluge, would that be a successful method to increase chances (and exposure?)

My guess is that you have to be a RWA member to submit, but I was wondering about that. It could be a terrible idea, but I like the idea of a gay romance tsunami, overrunning the shores with hot, naked torsos.


message 47: by Tara (new)

Tara Spears | 55 comments RWA chapters, I know for a fact, are bias on LGBT entries for their contests. RWA as a whole is also bias on new authors. I won't bore you will the details but I have not been happy with how I have been treated by my own local chapter.

With that said... why enter with an organization who treats you that way when you can submit to the Rainbow Awards and Lambda, and be welcomed with open arms?

I had planned to attend the Emerald City RWA confrence again, but after the way they treated me, and others, this year I am boycotting going at this time.

I am happy with RRW, but to correct a point made above. RRW does not have the rainbow awards, they are only assisting with them. That may change down the road or RRW might consider their own awards program.

Whatever happens I support RRW and hope that they, as well as LGBT authors find their voice. BUT, remember, LGBT and M/M genres are just beginning to find the way. Until very recently anyone who could write fairly, and create a decent story, could get published. VERY few (hate me if you will) authors could/can truly compete with best selling romance writers. I am sorry, but this is true. Now, we are seeing readers more interested in well written MM and LGBT books and I believe over the next few years we will see huge leaps in the quality of the books offered.

For those that don't know... Harlequin is now accepting LGBT themed romances. That is a pretty big step. Harper, Hespirion, Penguin, SandS, Scholastic, Brown, and several others have been accepting LGBT themed or LGBT character driven books for some time now.

Okay, off my soap box...


message 48: by ttg (new)

ttg | 571 comments Mod
Tara wrote: "RWA chapters, I know for a fact, are bias on LGBT entries for their contests. RWA as a whole is also bias on new authors. I won't bore you will the details but I have not been happy with how I have..."

I'm sorry if you've had bad experiences with RWA chapters. That sounds very frustrating and disheartening.

Regarding submissions, I do think it might be good to still have LGBT romance writers submit their stories to things like RWA. The writers are easy to ignore if they don't push their way in. I'd love to see a lot of submissions (and the fact is, there were well-written books last year. It would be great to have one of them (or more!) recognized, or at the very acknowledged for existing.)

I'm one of those people though who if I see something that should be accepting stuff, but isn't, I'll keep pushing my way in. :) A bit of oppositional disorder there.

I'd hate to have so many great authors ignored because they're worn down due to either an unclear or unfriendly system. What's one way of making a system friendly? By telling them we're in for the long haul, and that we look forward to working with them. :) (And then sticking around, being annoying and present.)

It's hard though. I say that from experience too. It's not easy. :/


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