Edgy Christian Fiction Lovers discussion

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Anyone read a real "shocker" of a story lately?

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message 1: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (michelle_sutton) | 55 comments Mod
I mean like a book that made you think, "Wow, I can't believe they were able to keep that stuff in this book and didn't have it cut!"


message 2: by Stu (new)

Stu | 7 comments I don't want to be that obnoxious person who is always plugging their work but it's actually very relevant to this topic. :P

I ended up self publishing Through The Fury To The Dawn, because I knew that secular publishers would have a difficult time publishing something so overtly "Christian" and Christian publishers would cut crucial material because it was too graphic.

To be quite honest some of the material is quite shocking and may not be palatable for the more conservative/sensitive Christian reader.

It was a difficult choice for me - to include material that in some cases was so harsh it made my eyes water while I was writing it - but it was one that was ultimately necessary.

Okay - I'm done being that guy - for now... :D

Cheers!

http://www.actionofpurpose.com/home


message 3: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 15 comments I recently edited a self-published book that included teen groupie sex, unwed pregnancy, alcoholism, child neglect, marriage rape, incest, homosexuality, wifebeating, porn addiction, club-hopping ... two deaths from cancer, child alienation, ehhh ... All happening to one person, with backstories of really sinful pasts for all the main characters and amazing conversions. Not so much shocking as unbelievable, if I could just say it as kindly as possible.


message 4: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (michelle_sutton) | 55 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "I recently edited a self-published book that included teen groupie sex, unwed pregnancy, alcoholism, child neglect, marriage rape, incest, homosexuality, wifebeating, porn addiction, club-hopping ...."

Wow, that sounds...exhausting!


message 5: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 15 comments It was. :-(


message 6: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (michelle_sutton) | 55 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "It was. :-("

Anything uplifting at all?


message 7: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 15 comments The narrator had Christian friends who showed her examples of Christian love throughout the book no matter how much bad stuff she got involved in.


message 8: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 15 comments They were good people but all of them had sinful past stories. I left the book feeling that there were no Christians equipped to live a godly life and give godly counsel who hadn't been saved out of a sinful past.


message 9: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (michelle_sutton) | 55 comments Mod
I guess you write what you know and maybe the author knew a lot of people like that. If a church has a lot of new Christians, they often come with sordid stories.


message 10: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 15 comments I just think it's a disturbing trend that characters have to have a "past" in order to be able to counsel others.


message 11: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (michelle_sutton) | 55 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "I just think it's a disturbing trend that characters have to have a "past" in order to be able to counsel others."

A past isn't needed. That's a myth. However, God does take the lowliest of people and often changes them into people who no longer resemble the old. Maybe the author did this for the shock value? I don't know. I personally know a lot of people who have horrible pasts and were saved by Grace. If I wrote the truth about their histories no one would believe it, or I would have to tone it down for sensitive ears. I do think an author can write about people with pasts and not emphasize that as much as the new person they are today. But your past is always part of your memory, your reactions and to an extent, who you are today. If that weren't so, many new believers wouldn't be dysfunctional. And to an extent, we all are to some degree.


message 12: by Nike (last edited Jun 24, 2012 12:31AM) (new)

Nike Chillemi I think it's hard for people who were not born into Christianity to read books about people who were...and I have to add...all the time. It's OK to read novels where everyone's dad was a leader in the church sometimes.

I wasn't born in the church. It's not that I have such a sordid past in terms of what the world calls sordid. I've never had teen groupie sex, my husband doesn't beat me or cheat on me or rape me,I wasn't neglected by my parents though they were plenty neurotic, there was no incest, and most of the other stuff in that novel. My teens have huge problem. They were adopted at ages 6, 7, and 9 and were classified "hard to adopt." Some of those things happened in their bio-home. They've got heavy-duty issues.

Even though none of those things happened to me, I don't relate at all to a typical Christian home. None of my adopted children particularly want to follow Christ. They can be obnoxious about it. I grew up in a home where there was virtually no knowledge of Christianity.


message 13: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 15 comments Nike, it's true many are facing that situation. I did not grow up in a Christian home either, and I thank God a Christian family took me under their wings. They had their own set of problems. I just wonder if it's helpful to deal with all those problems in one story, a that really had no other plot or reason to exist.


message 14: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (michelle_sutton) | 55 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "Nike, it's true many are facing that situation. I did not grow up in a Christian home either, and I thank God a Christian family took me under their wings. They had their own set of problems. I jus..."

No other plot? Now that's messed up. I have a story about a girl who was taken in as a teen (informally) by a pastor and his wife because her mother was a mess. While that's her history and it drives her desire to marry a Christian man who wants to be a pastor, it's like maybe 2% of the book. I can't imagine a story where that is all the story is about. Sheesh.


message 15: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 15 comments I didn't really understand it myself, other than the possibility that it was really written as a counseling effort to people dealing with these serious life issues. I am sure there are people who need the counseling that the book contains. Different people dealing with different issues, but finding them covered in this one book, could make it a valuable resource.


message 16: by Nike (new)

Nike Chillemi Mary wrote: "Nike, it's true many are facing that situation. I did not grow up in a Christian home either, and I thank God a Christian family took me under their wings. They had their own set of problems. I jus..."

Mary, you bring up a good point. I'd say the problems of the family should further the story in some way. There is such a thing as toom many emotional/psychological issues. That's as bad as none.


message 17: by Nike (new)

Nike Chillemi Michelle wrote: "Mary wrote: "Nike, it's true many are facing that situation. I did not grow up in a Christian home either, and I thank God a Christian family took me under their wings. They had their own set of pr..."

Michelle, I agree. The secondary characters do have to have their own personalities, backstory, and issues. It doesn't take much to include that. A well placed sentence or two. But that's not the main plotline.


message 18: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 15 comments Nike wrote: "Mary wrote: "Nike, it's true many are facing that situation. I did not grow up in a Christian home either, and I thank God a Christian family took me under their wings. They had their own set of pr..."

Agreed, Nike.


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