The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

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General Chat > What is your price point for a Thriller?

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message 1: by Marc (new)

Marc Sima (MarcSima) | 35 comments Is cheaper always better? Or very cheap implies not a very good read? Thanks to Goodreads.com, do you feel you are making now better choices,not based on price consideration?


message 2: by Anne (new)

Anne (lchancey) | 62 comments Some writers I buy the day they hit the shelf. New writers that I have never read I will get at resale shops. I find if I enjoy their interview on NPR I am more willing to buy new writers.


message 3: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (gmombarb) | 15 comments Since buying my kindle, a whole new world of writers has opened up to me. Being able to read these virtually unknown writers at a cheap price is a plus for me. I haven't given up on established writers by any means. It's just that I now have a wider selection.


message 4: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (emtmelissa) | 35 comments I feel the same way as Barbara. Since I got my Nook...I have become aware of authors that I didn't know and many of them are cheap or even free. I've read some very good books that have been in the free to $2.99 range. If the book is from a very well known author that I have reading for years, I'm usually willing to pay $9.99 or so for a book.


message 5: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (emtmelissa) | 35 comments sorry about the typos guys.


message 6: by Linda (new)

Linda (beaulieulinda117gmailcom) | 1366 comments I haven't bought a book in a month, and that is because it was cheap on kindle. But if I were to buy I pay $20 for a hardcover.


message 7: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (emtmelissa) | 35 comments I thought I might add...I never buy paperbacks or hardcovers. All the books I purchase are through B & N and are on my Nook.


message 8: by Marc (new)

Marc Sima (MarcSima) | 35 comments Melissa, Linda, Barbara, thank you for your insights, they make a lot of sense, and reinforce each other. I wish you all a great week-end


message 9: by Marc (new)

Marc Sima (MarcSima) | 35 comments Anne thank you as well.


message 10: by Ken (new)

Ken Consaul | 209 comments Gone Girl at $13 for the e-book is pushing the limit IMHO. That said, being an author, if I were selling books at that pace I'd jack the price till the public complains.

I once decided I was going to be a consultant in kind of a niche business. Stuck my toe in the water at $48 an hour. Within 90 days I was turning business away at $80 per. Within a year, if there was more than four hours travel, I was charging $800 for a service call that included 3 hours of consultant time. No one ever complained about the rate. As I said, it was a niche field and it eventually dried up. Good times, just like a book that begins to click. Make hay.


message 11: by Marc (new)

Marc Sima (MarcSima) | 35 comments All above are great comments. My own view is that the whole point of e-books is availability and better price than paper back.
In my case, with direct publishing I believe that readers in this difficult economic times should not be asked to pay more than 2.99. I think it is fair to every one. I was a consultant too in one of those big US international firms. I would not even go into what I think about that industry...


message 12: by Mike (new)

Mike Wazowski (mikequist1) $7.99 (I'm cheap)


message 13: by Anne (new)

Anne (lchancey) | 62 comments I have gotten great books for 2.99 for my kindle. Writers I would never have picked up pop. I would never say I am a world reader, but pop up if you like this try that works for me when I am looking for a new read.


message 14: by Ken (new)

Ken Consaul | 209 comments I buy half a dozen books a month from Alibris or Abe. Most of the stuff I buy is one or two bucks and I only buy hardcover, almost new or new. I usually get dinged for about six bucks for shipping. Works out to about three bucks for a new or almost new.


message 15: by Linda (new)

Linda (beaulieulinda117gmailcom) | 1366 comments I pucked a novel by Lisa Jackson today at Walmart for $6.98.


message 16: by Linda (new)

Linda (beaulieulinda117gmailcom) | 1366 comments I pucked a novel by Lisa Jackson today at Walmart for $6.98.


message 17: by Ann (new)

Ann | 10 comments I'll pay $9.99 for a thriller ebook. Anything less is usually older or not as good as the new best sellers. I like that we can read inside so that we can decide if new authors are worth $9.99.


message 18: by Marc (new)

Marc Sima (MarcSima) | 35 comments Ann, what you are saying makes complete sense. Although you may be a late adopter of some authors, it does not really matter because there are so many books to chose from.
I would still find it strange if a fiction writer asks for 9.99 for an e-book when he is self-published. I don't feel that it is fair to the reader.
And that same price point maybe to low for most publisher.
I agree with you that being able to read "inside" a book is convenient (and fun)


message 19: by Vera (new)

Vera Maslow Price point doesn't necessarily factor into whether I want to read a book, but price may affect where I get the book from or when. If it is over $7.99 for physical book or $4.99 for ebook I will borrow from library systems or friends or wait to buy secondhand. If I can't find it in those places then I won't end up reading it.
As far as some of the freebies or cheaper books I find some have been very good books and there are some that I think we'll good thing it was free or .99 or I would be mad. Being at a cheaper price wouldn't dissuade me from purchasing but the synopsis or reviews might.


message 20: by Marc (new)

Marc Sima (MarcSima) | 35 comments Agreed Vera, bad books are already such a waste of time, they should not be a waste of money on top of it...


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

I like to read hardcover books but I don't like the price. I'm in a book club, Literary Guild, and when a book is coming out in a series that I read, I put it in my wish list until they have a sale. I buy when they are either buy one, get one free, or when they have a $9 sale and offer free shipping. Otherwise, I hit the bargain book section, charity sales, or used book stores for other gems. If I don't pay a lot for it, I don't feel bad about not liking it. I won't stop reading a book until I have finished even if I can't stand it because I'm too cheap to have spent even a couple dollars on something and not finish. Plus, I don't feel I can complain about a book if I haven't finished reading it. That's sort of like complaining about politicians and not voting.


message 22: by Bryan (new)

Bryan (bry422) | 29 comments Zero. I don't buy any books. This goes for movies/DVDs too. Library and video store. I've just never really been the kind of person who would re-read a book or re-watch a movie regardless of how much I liked it.


message 23: by Anne (new)

Anne (lchancey) | 62 comments I can not keep reading a book that is not reaching me. It may stay on my bookshelves for years and get picked up for another chance. I will not force march myself through a book, my time is worth something.


message 24: by Jim (new)

Jim Crocker | 176 comments I like the Kindle books because I can adjust the font and point size. I'm old. It's a big deal. Kindle price tops out at $6.00 for authors I don't already know. Those that I follow all the time, it pretty much doesn't matter. I always check the library for hardcopy, big print and eBooks!


message 25: by Anne (new)

Anne (lchancey) | 62 comments I like the font adjustment on kindle also.


message 26: by Marc (new)

Marc Sima (MarcSima) | 35 comments I am old too! Font adjustment is great agreed. And living abroad all my working life in complicated countries, I never had the luxury to walk in a book shop and buy everything, I wanted or even borrow from a library. Kindle and e-book in general has been great.
Then there is the waste of printing books. How long before we realize that it is not environmental friendly to do so?


message 27: by Debbie (new)

Debbie Bennett | 4 comments I'm unlikely to pay more than $4.99 for a punt on a new indie author, even after I've sampled. But for a known author with a track record, price is not an issue. But with most thriller books, if it doesn't grab me within the first few pages, I'm out anyway ...


message 28: by Ken (new)

Ken Consaul | 209 comments Marc wrote: "Then there is the waste of printing books. How long before we realize that it is not environmental friendly to do so? "

No one is ever going to fall asleep with their thumb in the middle of a kindle. I'll miss that.


message 29: by August (new)

August Wainwright (augustwainwright) | 31 comments I have a question:

Say you find a new author who's writing short stories and short novels (maybe 50k words) and self-publishes, pricing their work from $0.99 to $2.99. You read their entire library over the next month or two, you're a huge fan, and you still only shell out a total of $20-$30.

Then, a few months pass, and the author publishes a collection of multiple titles in some sort of super-special, limited-edition, leather bound hardback that's signed and hand numbered to 500. The author sells these books through their own website, bypassing Amazon, B&N, etc. in favor of a more intimate relationship with their biggest fans. He/She asks for $49 for the book.

So my question is, how would you feel as a fan of this thriller writer? Would you scoff at the huge cost or embrace the limited-edition aspect of what the author was delivering?

I'm just interested in the idea of thriller writers (all writers) stepping outside of the normal situation and engaging their core audience. If someone wrote excellent work, yet priced it extremely low, then offset those low prices with special pieces once or twice a year, would you be receptive to that?


message 30: by Debbie (new)

Debbie Bennett | 4 comments If the collection contained new material I *might* think about it. But generally signed and/or limited editions do nothing for me. I have a fair few signed books and first editions/proof copies etc and if they're not authors I'm likely to read, I give them away to people I know will appreciate them more than me.


message 31: by Olga (new)

Olga Miret (goodreadscomolganm) | 3 comments This is a fascinating topic. I'm a reader but I write also and that's one of these things where you can't get much clarity. Personally I agree with the comments about the easy access of e-books (and yes, I also need reading glasses now so font size adjustment is a Godsend). I use (or used) the library, mostly because of the number of books I have accumulated that I have no longer space for (even giving some away to charity shops I find it difficult to dispose of books...).
I asked other readers how they chose books and price didn't feature prominently (if at all). I don't buy many hardcover books (not for myself anyway) these days, but bestsellers you can buy in supermarkets and everywhere, and I've bought books in charity shops (although normally I'll return them back when I'm read or pass them on to other people). Unless they are presents of by some author I really love I wouldn't pay exorbitant prices for special features.
These days most authors are accessible via social media so not sure it adds a lot unless it's a very personal, small group discussion. And here in Goodreads you can also connect with many writers.
$2.99 seems to be an accepted price for e-books but there's a big variety of options. Some authors go for low prices to gain exposure, and in my experience reading self-published authors for the last few months I'd say price hardly ever equates with quality.


message 32: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 239 comments Quality is quality, for want of a better phrase. I spent £12 on a book once, and it was not worth the tree that had been cut down for it. On the other hand, I've bought books for pennies and they've turned out to be good, so it's a mixed bag.


message 33: by Glenn (new)

Glenn Muller | 28 comments This was something I recently struggled with when determining the price point for my own thriller.

Factors I considered were:

Time invested - years

Length of novel - 90,000 words

Price of comparable books - $2.99 to $14.99
($14.99 for an e-book is ludicrous!)

My royalty share - yes, I want something out of this.

I finally decided on $14.99 for the 320 page softcover, and $5.99 for the e-book. The book has been selling, though it is brand new and too early to tell if the price is right.


message 34: by Kate (new)

Kate Vane (katevane) If it was one of my favourite authors and I was desperate to read the book I might go to £6 (about $9) for the e-book. Any more than that and I'd wait and get a hard copy from the library.

Otherwise I'd be unlikely, these days, to pay more than about £2-3 for an e-book. There are so many books available at this price that I want to read - by both new and established authors.


message 35: by Frances (new)

Frances Plino (francesdiplino) | 48 comments Good debate. As a reader, I expect e-books to be considerably cheaper than paper versions, but as an author, I also want to get a fair return on the time I've invested in writing, rewriting, editing, rewriting, editing yet again and so on.

A good book is worth paying for, I think. On the other hand, a poor book is too expensive even if it only costs a few pence/cents.


message 36: by Richard (new)

Richard (ricoh) | 106 comments You are paying for the original creative work; you can borrow from a library or own. If you pay per hour then £19.99 is £4 - £5 per hour. Live sport is far more expensive. The worry is the loss of independent book shops who could compete with say Adda offering in the UK this weekend 'Poppet' by Mo Hayder and The Lost Boy (Patrick Hedstrom and Erica Falck, Book 7) by Camilla Lackberg both for £6 in hardback.
The argument has to be volume; the more sold and read the chance for future sales. But the independents....................


message 37: by Kate (new)

Kate Vane (katevane) Frances wrote: "I also want to get a fair return on the time I've invested in writing, rewriting, editing, rewriting, editing yet again and so on."

We can but dream...


message 38: by Frances (new)

Frances Plino (francesdiplino) | 48 comments Kate wrote: "Frances wrote: "I also want to get a fair return on the time I've invested in writing, rewriting, editing, rewriting, editing yet again and so on."

We can but dream..."


Sigh ...


message 39: by Maggie (new)

Maggie Lynn | 9 comments I think price is a based on quality. The test is how you feel after reading it. If it was a quick read at 99 cents then you feel like it was a steal. If it was $9.99 and you couldn't finish it because it was so bad then you'll be that much more hesitant next time.


message 40: by Michael (new)

Michael | 1 comments ebook-7.99-12.99 seems standard for good authors
paperback-7.99-19.99
hardback-I expect to pay between $24 and $30


message 41: by Susan from MD (last edited Apr 09, 2013 11:56AM) (new)

Susan from MD | 58 comments Interesting question. For mysteries/thrillers, I don't spend as much as for other types of fiction - unless it is an author that I really like. I rarely buy hardcover books because of their price and the amount of space they take up (I have a small apartment!).

Mysteries/thrillers (new author/one I like but don't love): ebook or paperback - up to $6
M/T author that I love: ebook - up to $9; paperback - up to $12

Other fiction (new author/one I like but don't love): ebook - up to $8; paperback - up to $12
Other fiction author that I love: ebook - up to $12; paperback - up to $16

If I don't know the author and haven't read reliable reviews, I will hesitate before spending any money.

Likely to take a chance: if the ebook or paperback is less than $4.


message 42: by Kate (new)

Kate Vane (katevane) Out of interest, do people use libraries much? I'm especially curious about US readers as I don't know how popular they are there.

My decisions about pricing are influenced by the fact that I can get most books from the library free (or for a 50p reservation fee) if I'm prepared to wait and wondered if that's a factor for other people.


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

Kate wrote: "Out of interest, do people use libraries much? I'm especially curious about US readers as I don't know how popular they are there.

My decisions about pricing are influenced by the fact that I can ..."


My kids read from the library during the school year. They have a broad selection that I don't have here at home. During the summer vacation, they read books they have received as gifts, then some of mine that I think they would enjoy. I only read mysteries so selecting books from the library gives them a much bigger pool to choose from. They can enjoy mine while camping in the summer. It seems to work out pretty well.


message 44: by James (new)

James (lordgil) My price point is the $.10 fee I have to pay per day if the book is overdue.


message 45: by David (new)

David Freas (quillracer) | 2274 comments Kate wrote: Out of interest, do people use libraries much? I'm especially curious about US readers as I don't know how popular they are there.

My decisions about pricing are influenced by the fact that I can get most books from the library free (or for a 50p reservation fee) if I'm prepared to wait and wondered if that's a factor for other people.


I prefer to buy the books I read because that eliminates the time constraints (2 weeks) to read library books but will raid the library when I can't get to the bookstore (It's 45 minutes from my home).


message 46: by Bernie (new)

Bernie Dowling (beedeed) | 82 comments Michael wrote: "ebook-7.99-12.99 seems standard for good authors
paperback-7.99-19.99
hardback-I expect to pay between $24 and $30"

6X9 thrillers of about 400 pages are $29.99 paperback in Australia. We pay that because it is our norm.Book lovers will pay whatever they have to and hope a fair share gets back to the author.


message 47: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (nsbaumunk) | 3 comments I use the library often for books I want to read, but not necessarily own. My preferred price point for ebooks is $9.99 or less, since I can't pass them along to friends. One of my favorite series is the Gabriel Allon books by Daniel Silva. There is a new book coming out and I noticed that the per-order price for the ebook is $17.99! I will definitely be borrowing that from the library.


message 48: by Kate (new)

Kate Vane (katevane) I think Amazon have done quite an effective job of setting expectations for ebook prices with their £2.99 or less promotion in the UK (I believe there are equivalent promotions in other countries).

Good news for readers - at least in the short term - but not so much for writers!


message 49: by Frances (new)

Frances Plino (francesdiplino) | 48 comments Kate wrote: "I think Amazon have done quite an effective job of setting expectations for ebook prices with their £2.99 or less promotion in the UK (I believe there are equivalent promotions in other countries)...."

Very true and writers deserve to get a fair return on the years of work that goes into creating a novel.

*gets off high horse*


message 50: by Brian (new)

Brian January (brianjanuary) | 40 comments I price my thrillers from $2.99-$3.99, which I think is very fair for the amount of time and effort involved!


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