James Herbert fans discussion

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RIP to one of my favorites of all time

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message 1: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (number1fan) | 5 comments James Herbert

So shocked to hear of his passing. I still remember my first Herbert...'The haunted cottage'. It hooked me for life and I proceeded to buy all his books. I've read and re-read all of his novels numerous times. He had such a wonderful, mesmerizing way of capturing the horror of each story, ensuring that the tale stays with you long after you've finished the last page. My dear Herbert family, you've had the great privilege of living with a master of his craft, may you find peace and comfort in the knowledge that his works will keep him alive for you and his fans forever. My thoughts and prayers are with you....and if he is to be believed, somewhere, he is watching us, keeping tabs on us and making up new and wonderful tales as he travels through different dimensions.


message 2: by Ronnie, (new)

Ronnie, | 62 comments Wow, what a wonderful statement,
Agreed


message 3: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (number1fan) | 5 comments Ronnie, wrote: "Wow, what a wonderful statement,
Agreed"


You know, Ronnie, I keep on envisioning Jim cruising through eternity in an Edgar Allan Poe-ish top-hat and black coat, picking up stories as he goes along. Who knows? Maybe David Ash will have an encounter with him someday and we'll read about it in the Psychic Investigative Journal or something! Gosh, I'm SO going to miss looking forward to new books from his pen!


message 4: by Ronnie, (new)

Ronnie, | 62 comments Me too, He seemed so down to earth and no doubt a really nice man, I've been reading his books since a teenager and Loved them,
His books will be an inspiration to further paranormal writers, so sad just one more proper horror book would have done, I have ideas but not sure how to go about it,
James Herbert. Legend.


message 5: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (number1fan) | 5 comments Ronnie, wrote: "Me too, He seemed so down to earth and no doubt a really nice man, I've been reading his books since a teenager and Loved them,
His books will be an inspiration to further paranormal writers, so s..."


I know how you feel. I've read several Shaun Hutson's..he writes wonderful tales and really reminds me more of Herbert's style than Stephen King (adore his work too) and Dean Koontz (read his books, but not a HUGE fan, though)combined. Peter James' paranormal stuff is also great. I'm currently reading 'Faith', but has all the others like 'The Truth', 'Dreamer', etc. James' detective stories are also a fav. Roy Grace is SUCH a cool DCI. Another author I must suggest is Barbara Erskine. She writes beautifully and her novels always has some weird link with the past. 'House of Echoes' was especially good and introduced me to her style. She tends to drag on sometimes, though, but the stories are really enjoyable. You know what suddenly struck me! My family suggested that I'm stark, raving mad for reading all these paranormal stuff....well, they may just be right! Life is far too serious for people to keep on reading 'real life'....and, after all, one has to believe in something 'beyond', don't you think?


message 6: by Ronnie, (new)

Ronnie, | 62 comments Absolutely, I Love the paranormal and the horror genre, read all Herbert's and Kings, not a great fan of Koontz though not scary enough, Graham Masterton is fab too, I always say the best horrors include children


message 7: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (number1fan) | 5 comments Couldn't agree more...you know that's why I simply love Steve King's 'It'....he manages to frighten the child in each of us. He uses the stuff that nightmares are made of and make it REAL. My brother is also an avid reader, but King and Herbert scares him (shame, poo baby!)...he reads Clive Cussler, Lee Child and Nelson de Mille. I also had a fling with them, and did enjoy Child's characters and De Mille's talent for turning something into an epic adventure. Cussler, though, good writing, but not my type.
You should also try Joe Hill (Steve's son)...and John Connolly's 'Every dead thing'. Justin Cronin is VERY good too.
Did I mention I make a point of buying the DVD's when books are adapted....often a huge disappointment, but I can't seem able to help myself! It's a strange addiction this!


message 8: by Ronnie, (new)

Ronnie, | 62 comments True, IT is my favourite King book, very unpredictable but can't help myself to watch film adaptions, Misery, Shawshank and The green mile are the best I've seen of these, Carrie is a classic and now that's been remade too,never read anything by his son but will give it a go,


message 9: by Terri-Lea (new)

Terri-Lea Chowles (time2stand) | 17 comments Herbert was the best graphic horror storyteller, while King writes more mild horror that focuses a lot more on story and character development. Take The Stand as exhibit A.


message 10: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (number1fan) | 5 comments Terri-Lea wrote: "Herbert was the best graphic horror storyteller, while King writes more mild horror that focuses a lot more on story and character development. Take The Stand as exhibit A."

You are SO right Terri-Lea! I've always wondered why people continue to compare authors....each has his or her own unique style. Something avid readers can recognize anywhere. One has to appreciate them for their craft, their creation of a tale. I've often heard people say that Peter James, for instance, is the UK's answer to Stephen King. I SO not agree! Peter writes beautifully, but so does King....each weaving their own kind of stories with wonderful twists and turns, never just blindly following the example of the other.


message 11: by Ronnie, (new)

Ronnie, | 62 comments I agree with that, if they were the same at writing it wouldn't make them the legends they are


message 12: by Terri-Lea (new)

Terri-Lea Chowles (time2stand) | 17 comments Exactly, while Peter James is brilliant (especially love how his setting is Brighton), he's nothing like King.


message 13: by Ronnie, (new)

Ronnie, | 62 comments I always Loved the way Herbert wrote, It's hard to believe Fluke and The Rats were written by the same hand,


message 14: by Peter (new)

Peter Gray | 7 comments My very first dip into the world of horror came about during Primary 7 when I managed to get my hands on a Horror Anthology Book, featuring contributions from Edgar Allen Poe and others of his ilk, from a recent Jumble Sale but made the mistake of taking it to school where, before I even had the chance to read the introduction I had it confiscated by one of the Nuns taking Class. I'll always remember the disdainful way she plucked it out of my hands, chucked it in the bin and warned me against reading "those type of books" which I dutifully didn't (for nearly two years).

I didn't come into contact with anything else until a friend in 2nd year at Secondary School loaned me his copy of James Herbert's "The Survivor" which I gorged my way through in less than a day and was totally ready for more. The Rats, Lair, The Fog, The Dark, The Spear, Sepulchre, Domain....in fact most of the reading I did through the 80's were exclusively from Mr Herbert's Back & Current Catalogue.

James Herbert helped me realise where my loyalty's lay and although I've since moved on to more Dark Fantasy reads as Raymond Feist's incredible "Faerie Tale", I'll never forget my roots and the countless, if morbidly disturbing, journeys James Herbert took me on through adolescence and into adulthood. So for your services in establishing a good morale conduct on par with that taught me by the Church, (albeit on the flip side) I'd like to thank you and hope to see you on the Right Side of the Great Divide, Someday.


message 15: by Ronnie, (new)

Ronnie, | 62 comments I first read The Rats when I was about 12, it wasn't until I read Lair that I realised how good Mr.Herbert was, favourite is The Ghosts of Sleath,


message 16: by Peter (new)

Peter Gray | 7 comments Ronnie, wrote: "I first read The Rats when I was about 12, it wasn't until I read Lair that I realised how good Mr.Herbert was, favourite is The Ghosts of Sleath," Good choice, I read The Survivor around the same age then the Rats & Lair although Domain was the ultimate end to the Trilogy (I don't count the Graphic Novel because I never managed to get my hands on a copy at the time but wish I had coz they're selling for ridiculous amounts of money on eBay, Amazon & all). I was abit disappointed at the time with the direction he took on '48 although it was an enjoyable tale it felt too much like he was trying to recreate himself and it didn't quite fit. Might make for a decent film nowadays given the popularity Hollywood has with the current trend Apocalypse films. It was bit too "Omega Man" but that's not a problem, I loved that book and subsequent Charlton Heston & Will Smith filmed versions.

I remember going on a full circle backpacking holiday over two weeks around Scotland with one of my mates in the Summer of '86 with nothing to live off but two weeks supplementary benefit whilst on break from college and enjoying "Moon" (amongst other things - namely Beer, Lassies and more Beer). Good Times :)


message 17: by H (new)

H Hunt | 2 comments A literary giant, a word wizard... He's takin me 2 places I'll never 4get, he's influenced my view on the world. His narrative will live beyond all, see you on the other side & every time I read one of Your books the vail grows thinner & thinner... You've helped us all to see, Herbert is unrivaled =+=


message 18: by Shubham (new)

Shubham Srivastava | 3 comments RIP to Mr.Herbert..Just purchased "Nobody True" and "Sepulchre"..


message 19: by Ronnie, (new)

Ronnie, | 62 comments Both good books, Nobody True does make you think, must read it again one day


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