To Green Angel Tower (Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn, #3) To Green Angel Tower discussion


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Is this the longest fantasy book?

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message 1: by Michael (new)

Michael I looked up the word count and it said it had 520,000 words,is this the longest fantasy novel.If not please list the one.


message 2: by Aaron (last edited Mar 17, 2013 12:33AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Aaron Carson Wraeththu by Storm Constantine It's three volumes in one, does that count?
There's also The King of Ys by Poul Anderson I'm just going by thickness though. I didn't look up the word count.


message 3: by Michael (new)

Michael Both are wrong,since they hold more then one book per volume it is not a single volume


R.J. Gilbert Technically, you could say the same about To Green Angel Tower. When it was released as a paperback, it was divided into two seperate paperbacks (parts 1 and 2). I think it might have been one of the first to do that, because I remember it made a lot of news among the Tad Williams fans at the time.

Also, TGAT was book three of the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series, which might also affect its status as a stand-alone book in some eyes.


Aaron Carson Oh yes, I actually thought you were talking about one of the volumes which was why I got confused.


message 6: by Michael (new)

Michael Robert wrote: "Technically, you could say the same about To Green Angel Tower. When it was released as a paperback, it was divided into two seperate paperbacks (parts 1 and 2). I think it might have been one of t..."

2 parts of the same novel,and then it was published in its full form.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Robert wrote: "Technically, you could say the same about To Green Angel Tower. When it was released as a paperback, it was divided into two seperate paperbacks (parts 1 and 2). I think it might have been one of t..."

I don't think he's looking for a stand-alone; otherwise yes, that would definitely affect it. However, it's unfortunate split for paperback convenience does not affect is since that was simply a matter of practicality and it is one single novel and was written, released and read as such.

As for addressing the original post, no I cannot think of a longer one. In fact, To Green Angel Tower is one of the longest single works ever written in English. I've actually done a lot of research on this stuff because I find it really interesting.

The official list uses a system based off of these following factors: A single novel published by an official publisher, longer than 500,000 words and they have to be singular novels, not series or story cycles. They have to be novels, so epic poetry and any non-novel nonfiction would not count, nor would story compilations or graphic novels (though a 500,000-word graphic novel would be immensly impressive and I'm sure Spider-Man's Clone Saga has got to be the equivalent of a 500,000-word novel lol.)

Many of these long novels had to be split for publishing reasons and are still singular works because all of these factors apply to them. Some of my favorite novels, which happen to be classics, are on this list including Atlas Shrugged, Les Miserebles, War & Peace and Infinite Jest. Other classics such as Remembrance Rock and I believe all four of the major Chinese Classics make it onto the list. I'm certain at least three of them do. And I think the Tale of Genji makes it on there as well.


message 8: by Garth (new) - added it

Garth Mailman I have read this book and previously commented that this author suffers from verbal diarrhea. Most of his books would be stronger for the elimination of 200 pages or more of extraneous material. This one even more. Since the advent of word processors writers no longer have to manually edit their copy and have no impetus to remove unnecessary verbiage that adds nothing to the plot.


R.J. Gilbert Garth wrote: "I have read this book and previously commented that this author suffers from verbal diarrhea. Most of his books would be stronger for the elimination of 200 pages or more of extraneous material. Th..."

Ouch. I don’t think I can agree with you, having read Caliban's Hour and Child of an Ancient City by the same author. However, I will admit as a writer myself that sometimes you read some of those old “toilet paper” novels (Robinson Crusoe comes to mind) and think “I want to write like that”. You know, just droning on and on, page after page, as though you still live in the era where people judge a book not by the picture on its cover but by how many trips to the outhouse lay between. (Sorry, kids, it’s late and I’ve had a mocha.) I suppose, after his success with Tailchaser’s Song, he was probably given license to do just that. Or maybe he just had to tie up all the loose ends from the first two books (the first book being almost entirely devoted to Simon’s childhood, if memory serves me) and couldn’t do it any quicker.


message 10: by Garth (new) - added it

Garth Mailman Robert wrote: "Garth wrote: "I have read this book and previously commented that this author suffers from verbal diarrhea. Most of his books would be stronger for the elimination of 200 pages or more of extraneou..."

Oh, he could certainly have done it more succinctly. The first two books in that trilogy suffered from the same wordiness. Contrast that style of writing with Will R Bird's Here Stays Good Yorkshire and you'll see what I mean.


message 11: by Bill (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bill Golden The closest I can find is Imajica by Clive Barker. It's been a while, so I don't remember how many pages the original print run was, but it has since been cut into two volumes in subsequent printings.


Aaron Carson Oh good one. I loved Imagica. I think Return to Angel Tower might be longer though, if you take both volumes together.


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