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message 1: by Bill (new)

Bill Superficially, Kvothe has retired to an inn in the middle of nowhere (Newarre) because he wants to disappear. And again, superficially, that makes sense, until we examine a couple of things.

1. Baedn-Bryt (which is 3-4 days travel from Newarre) is speculated to be the home of Bredon, who is also speculated to be an enemy of Kvothe. Yes, lots of speculation there. But, in any case, why would Kvothe, who is as well-traveled as possibly anyone in the world, set up camp in the backyard of his enemy if he truly wishes to remain hidden? My answer: he doesn't want to remain hidden.

2. I haven't seen this point addressed anywhere, but again, at the beginning of NOTW, Chronicler mentions how he can get Kvothe's story *after* his meeting with the Earl. He then mentions that he'll bring Skarpi back with him. Again, if Kvothe wants to disappear, why did he set up an inn so close to one of the few people (in the grand scheme of things) who knows him on a personal level?

3. Why set up an inn at all? He's wealthy. Inns are places that, by nature, have frequent strangers pass through. Sooner or later he'll be recognized by *someone* who wants to find him. An innkeeper seems like a uniquely horrible choice for someone who claims he wants to disappear.


message 2: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Butler | 14 comments In regard to number 3, is it impossible that it's just a bit of whimsy? In NOTW, he compliments an innkeeper on his inn, and comments that he would like to have one as nice one day. Or something to that effect.


message 3: by Manda (new)

Manda | 115 comments I think it could be. We know Kvothe doesn't always do what's smart or safe. Often, he just does whatever appeals to him.

Still, it's possible he didn't really want to disappear. Perhaps he just needed some time away... like his time in the forest after his troupe was killed. Maybe he is not hiding so much as stepping back and taking time to recover from whatever happened.


message 4: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte (lostoceans) | 8 comments Could Bast have had an influence on the decision? we know he's trying to bring back Kvothe and they have a good friendship, I don't think Kote would have them move without at least asking Bast where he would to live.

Newarre is also not the first place they have lived and inn-keeping might not be the only disguise he's used. As a traveler Kvothe/Kote has has a lot of experiences with inns and how they run. Remember when he asks Chronicler about the apple pulp from the cider? he's not familiar with normal life. He would have no idea how to work a farm.

(I don't have the book with me now or I'd try to be more specific)


message 5: by Bill (new)

Bill Personally, I just think it's evidence that Kvothe is planning a trap for someone. My guess for who that would be? Bredon. I believe Bredon and Kvothe become enemies at some point. Bredon hurts Kvothe terribly (perhaps by killing Denna/making Kvothe *believe* that Denna has been killed. But Kvothe escapes somehow, regroups, and formulates his next move in the game. As we know from the game of Tak, Bredon believes the most beautiful way to play is to spring the trap and still defeat your opponent. I believe Kvothe has set up the Waystone as his somewhat obvious trap. Bredon, underestimating Kvothe from when he'd bested Kvothe in the past, sees the Waystone for the obvious trap that it is, and will end up attempting to defeat Kvothe in the final book.

HOWEVER, Kvothe has learned how to play the game better than Bredon finally, and the Waystone is only a diversion. I believe he's set up another nasty surprise for Bredon. (Though I don't know what such a trap would consist of.)

I do think, though, that there is nothing accidental about where and why he set himself up as an innkeeper.


message 6: by Becky  (new)

 Becky  (nvrayn) | 25 comments Do you think there is an actual waystone or greystone at that location or he just called the inn that because of his fondness for them?? I'm pondering an idea that the graystones have something to do with the "door" in the next book.


message 7: by Bill (new)

Bill ☆ Becky ☆ wrote: "Do you think there is an actual waystone or greystone at that location or he just called the inn that because of his fondness for them?? I'm pondering an idea that the graystones have something to..."

I think there almost has to be a graystone somewhere on the premises. Why?

At this point in the story, the graystones are still a pretty big mystery. But we do know that Kvothe's inn is also called the Waystone. It would be pretty disappointing to find out, after the big reveal of what waystones/graystones actual are in book 3, that his inn was just named that incidentally.


message 8: by Becky  (new)

 Becky  (nvrayn) | 25 comments Why? Mostly I was just wondering if anyone had picked up on there being an actual waystone at the inn.

I have been thinking about the stones and wondering what their significance is. They have to be more than just rocks on the side of the road. I have been thinking about them in relation to "The Doors of Stone".

I have been rereading the books, I am not close halfway through the second book, but I've been thinking about doors.  I really hadn't planned on putting this forward until was closer to the end of WMF, but here goes... Be gentle with me.  

Is it conceivable that the Fae world and the Human world are connected by the greystones, that they are doorways connecting two the worlds?

Greystones •  Doors?   

[1]
While Kvothe and Denna are in Trebon and were out and about looking for Master Ash, they found some greystones at the top of a hill.

NOTW • [Chapter 74 • Waystone]  "...to form a huge arch, like a massive doorway."  

"The only thing on the top of the hill was a handful of greystones. Three of the massive stones were stacked together to form a huge arch, like a massive doorway. The other two lay on their sides, as if lounging in the thick grass. I found their presence comforting, like the unexpected company of old friends."

[2]
After a night of drinking, Willem showed Kvothe, Sim a greystone by the bridge. The  following morning they met at the Archives to research the wagers they had made night before. They were discussing Sim & Kvothe's question about the greystones and Sim read a passage from one of the books that spoke about the greystones being a passage into the Fae world.

WMF • [Chapter 39 • Contradictions] "The locals refer to it as the door-post" 

“…a pair of matched stone monoliths with a third across the top. The locals refer to it as the door-post. While spring and summer pageants involve decorating and dancing around the stone, parents forbid their children from spending time near it when the moon is full. One well-respected and otherwise reasonable old man claimed at certain times men could pass through the stone door into the fair land where Felurian herself abides, loving and destroying men with her embrace.”


message 9: by Becky  (new)

 Becky  (nvrayn) | 25 comments



message 10: by Bill (new)

Bill ☆ Becky ☆ wrote: "Why? Mostly I was just wondering if anyone had picked up on there being an actual waystone at the inn.

I have been thinking about the stones and wondering what their significance is. They have ..."


My "Why?" was rhetorical, I answered my own question there. I absolutely agree that there has to be some significance to the name of Kvothe's in other than happenstance. And as I alluded to, waystones/graystones are a gigantic teaser. We as readers know they'll be used for something, but as of yet, we have no idea what.

W/R/T to your theory, yes, I believe that is one of the commonly accepted theories of what the waystones are. How that ties in to the name of Kvothe's inn, I haven't a clue at the moment.


message 11: by Chris, Master Artificer (new)

Chris (chris300) | 387 comments Mod
It could just be a literary device like the 'waystone' is our access to Kvothe's story. I think it's just a nice bit of poetic writing, not everything will be an "OMG HUGE SURPRISE", I think anyway. It would be exhausting! lol


message 12: by thistlepong, Master Namer (new)

thistlepong | 340 comments Mod
You seem to be suffering from some sort of speculation exhaustion, Chris. Nothing is of special significance, nor is it worth exploring.


message 13: by Chris, Master Artificer (new)

Chris (chris300) | 387 comments Mod
It's been a hectic week. I think I'm suffering from run-of-the-mill exhaustion!


message 14: by Amber, Master Sympathist (new)

Amber (ivorydoom) | 1471 comments Mod
Yep, pretty sure you are right on that Becky. I think in Book 1 Arliden says something about them being doors to fae as well. (or maybe it was Abenthy, I haven't read these in a while)

Also, we know that a waystone was near every location the Chandrian have appeared in the story.

I'm pretty sure (may want to double check me) there is one near the place Kvothe returns to his world after his fun with Felurian.

I don't know if they just go to fae, but I assume they are a form of dimmensional door.
It's something I've seen used a lot in Roleplaying actually, and in that environment is often extremely dangerous.


Also I kinda like what Chris said about maybe the Inn being called the Waystone because its the door through which we see the story. Thats actually a pretty interesting way of seeing it IMO. And also completely accurate.


message 15: by Chris, Master Artificer (new)

Chris (chris300) | 387 comments Mod
I always thought that the human and Fae worlds used to know about each other but whereas fae lived on, human lives are shorter and generations died out taking their knowledge with them.

I think that the humans of that time built the waystones to mark the entry ways into the Faen. This could have been so they can easily locate them or even a warning to avoid these places during the waxing of the moon. Felurian herself said that K needed to walk carefully when the moon vanishes lest a Fae being attack him.

So in conclusion: The waystones were made (like stonehenge) to mark the way. I think they're just normal stone, used as guidance. Not portals in their own right.


message 16: by Bill (new)

Bill Support for my speculation that Kvothe is setting a trap for someone comes when Bredon is explaining how to play a beautiful game of Tak.

"Any man that's half awake can spot a trap that's laid for him. But to stride in boldly with a plan to turn it on its ear, that is a marvelous thing. To set a trap and know someone will come in wary, read with a trick of their own, then beat them. That is twice marvelous."

So, I was kinda right in my supposition above, but it's nice to have it supported by the text. Kvothe set up the inn because he wants to be found.


message 17: by Amber, Master Sympathist (last edited Apr 05, 2013 09:18AM) (new)

Amber (ivorydoom) | 1471 comments Mod
I dont really see how that proves Kote set up an inn because he wants to be found....

I mean, it is some support for the theory, obviously it's a philosophy and strategy Kvothe learned during his games with Bredon, but still, there is nothing connecting the Waystone to that quote at all.


message 18: by Bill (new)

Bill Amber wrote: "I dont really see how that proves Kote set up an inn because he wants to be found....

I mean, it is some support for the theory, obviously it's a philosophy and strategy Kvothe learned during his ..."


Kvothe claims that he doesn't want to be found. We know this by how he drugs the guy who recognizes him.

He also threatens Chronicler when Chronicler offers to return after his visit to the Earl of Baedn-Bryt. He casually mentions that he might not be there, again, implying he doesn't want to be found.

Of course, all of this is completely negated by the fact that he set himself up as an innkeeper, pretty much the highest profile profession in the land. Because as an innkeeper, he'll be seen by a parade of people traveling the road. Not exactly the actions of someone who pretends he wants to remain hidden.

So, again, why set himself up as an innkeeper? Money? No, he has money. He enjoys it? Possibly, but again, if he truly values his secrecy enough to drug everyone who recognizes him, he's going to end up drugging a lot of people, which in and of itself is going to draw attention to him.

I don't see any other way to reconcile these notions than the fact that Kvothe *appears* to want to remain hidden, but in *fact* wants to be found.


message 19: by Amber, Master Sympathist (last edited Apr 05, 2013 10:38AM) (new)

Amber (ivorydoom) | 1471 comments Mod
Sometimes the best place to hide something is in plain sight.

I hardly consider an Innkeeper the Highest Profile profession in the land. He's a rural area bartender. He hardly even fills his rooms. He gets busted once because he sings a song, thats the only reason he even gets recognized.

He can hardly convince people he is Kvothe otherwise. Chronicler only even believed it and showed up because Skarpi directed him too.


message 20: by Chris, Master Artificer (new)

Chris (chris300) | 387 comments Mod
Yeah, I'm afraid I agree with Amber. It's not like he's an innkeeper in Tarbean or Vint. It's the middle of nowhere, you're point is supposed to answer 'Why Newarre', you kind of answered 'Why an inn keeper'.

That comment by Bredon doesn't strike me as the SOLE reason he's an innkeeper. All things point to him NOT planning a trap. I know you're big on the idea that book 3 will be shock after shock, I guess I personally don't buy that idea. There's loads about Kvothe waiting to die, silence killing him, him feeling desolate, that isn't someone who is planning a trap, in my mind.


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments Your argument is flawed... or incomplete. I think he wants to be found- but found by the right person/thing at the right time. I’m of the opinion that he is using the inn as a trap. Using himself as bait. I Don’t think naming/sympathy works in the inn. That’s why, Bast is there and that is why, Bast won’t let the Chronicler ask about, Kvothe not being able to perform sympathy.


message 22: by Amber, Master Sympathist (last edited Apr 05, 2013 12:28PM) (new)

Amber (ivorydoom) | 1471 comments Mod
Servius - just wondering if you have a second part to your theory, because I find it interesting.

How would the Inn stop people from using Naming and Sympathy?

I'm not against Kote setting a trap or anything, I just don't think that quote is a definitive reveal that is going to happen.

I'd say the thing that supports the trap theory more than anything is Kote's use of true names during his story and the fact the only true name he has called more than once, is Cinder's. A character he is directly set upon to attack by Cthaeh.


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments At one time I did... it has been over a year but I can give a rough outline, or parts of it-

Kvothe, holds his own away from the Inn against the scrael(sp). But is basically incompetent any other time. He doesn’t leave the inn- ever, after venturing out to deal with the scrael.

He has barrels made out of copper that he felt needed justification/a story to the craftsmen that built them for him- even though the craftsmen probably wouldn’t have asked. (small town assumption) Copper is agreed to be useful if one has beef with a namer. I don’t recall how this limited sympathy but there was some evidence that sympathy could be interfered with as well… maybe a Tor blog…

Bast knows why, Kvothe can’t perform sympathy. I’ll admit it seems odd that Bast would expect Kvothe to defeat the body walker or the toughs that rob, Kvothe- But I don’t think Basts poor judgment should disqualify the theory because Bast himself calls his own rational into question. I think Bast is there as a watch dog or as Kvothes attack dog- to defend kvothe from/ attack someone/thing for kvothe when the time/opportunity comes.

I’m sorry this is so muddled- it has been a long time since I read the books or participated in the threads. I just started rereading the series and am refreashing all the ideas in my head.


message 24: by Amber, Master Sympathist (new)

Amber (ivorydoom) | 1471 comments Mod
I thought the barrels were done with Bronze?

For the sake of Bast. I haven't read these in awhile myself, so I could be off on that.

I think I remember reading something about copper not being used for sygaldry or something like that...but again, don't quote me.


Interesting idea though.


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments bronze brass copper some such it has been a long time.


message 26: by Amber, Master Sympathist (new)

Amber (ivorydoom) | 1471 comments Mod
oh man, now that you said brass that seems right too.

*sigh*

Another reread is drawing nigh


message 27: by Bill (new)

Bill Amber wrote: "Sometimes the best place to hide something is in plain sight.

I hardly consider an Innkeeper the Highest Profile profession in the land. He's a rural area bartender. He hardly even fills his rooms. He gets busted once because he sings a song, thats the only reason he even gets recognized.

He can hardly convince people he is Kvothe otherwise. Chronicler only even believed it and showed up because Skarpi directed him too. "


Let's put it this way. We've seen two days of customers at the inn and on one of those days he was recognized. That's a 50% chance of him being recognized by someone per day. But let's say that this was an unusual case. Ok. Let's say he only has a 10% chance of being recognized per day. That's a crazy high percentage for someone who claims they want to remain hidden. The logical conclusion? He doesn't really want to remain hidden.


message 28: by Bill (new)

Bill Servius Heiner wrote: "Your argument is flawed... or incomplete. I think he wants to be found- but found by the right person/thing at the right time. I’m of the opinion that he is using the inn as a trap. Using himself a..."

Um, my entire point was that he's setting up a trap. I don't know how that makes my point flawed.


message 29: by Bill (new)

Bill Chris wrote: "Yeah, I'm afraid I agree with Amber. It's not like he's an innkeeper in Tarbean or Vint. It's the middle of nowhere, you're point is supposed to answer 'Why Newarre', you kind of answered 'Why an i..."

And I would suggest that you do a re-read and see all the foreshadowing that goes on. There is plenty. Either there is a payoff, or all the foreshadowing is a red herring. In the former case, it's satisfying to the careful reader. In the latter case, the reader will feel manipulated. I suggest that PR is going with the former.


message 30: by Bill (new)

Bill Amber wrote: "Sometimes the best place to hide something is in plain sight.

I hardly consider an Innkeeper the Highest Profile profession in the land. He's a rural area bartender. He hardly even fills his roo..."


I would argue that hiding something in plain sight in reality is like 99% of the time the worst place to hide something. Yes, as a phrase, it sounds nice. I can't remember a time when somebody hid something right in front of me that I was unable to find it. I find this line of reasoning to lack merit.


message 31: by Chris, Master Artificer (new)

Chris (chris300) | 387 comments Mod
I like the idea that Naming/Sympathy doesn't work in the Inn.

Excpetion: Chronicler uses the name of Iron to bind Bast...


message 32: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte (lostoceans) | 8 comments Bill wrote: I would argue that hiding something in plain sight in reality is like 99% of the time the worst place to hide something. Yes, as a phrase, it sounds nice..."

in plain sight does not mean it is obvious.

For starters most people who know of Kvothe have only heard the wild rumors and descriptions exaggerating certain points to fit the story. only a tiny percentage of the worlds population have ever seen the man behind the legends. Most probably years ago.

Secondly there must be a few people with similar appearances. its not like Kvothe/Kote is the only person to have red hair or green eyes. Bast also on many occasions mentions the changing colour of his eyes from grey(?) to green (and possibly once on his hair???).

Thirdly how oftern do you expect to find a legend serving you drinks at any common inn? Think about it. How often do you properly pay attention to the people on supermarket checkouts? or serving drinks at the local bar? would you notice if he/she was a celebrity of any kind? No we would never consider such a thing.

Kvothe is a very convincing actor. We know this from his past and from Bast mentioning how very innkeeper-y he acts and because Kote tries to tell that boy (cant remember his name) who he is but is unsuccessful in revealing himself.

Nawarre > Na warre > No where. This would imply it's not particularly on the map. That's assuming we've missed all the small town/village bit's in the book.

Even with Chronicler encouraging Kvothe stories, his customers never once point out his red hair or any such likeness.

Without Bast's hints Chronicler never would have passed through Nawarre and would probably never would have found Kvothe.


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments Chris wrote: "I like the idea that Naming/Sympathy doesn't work in the Inn.

Excpetion: Chronicler uses the name of Iron to bind Bast..."


That was naming- and not very effective if you recall. I know it isn't perfect, but...


message 34: by Manda (new)

Manda | 115 comments When Chronicler mentions Denna, a bottle of strawberry wine bursts on the shelves. I think Kvothe's power is still there but he doesn't seem wholly in control of it.

@Amber and Servius- I'm pretty sure the barrels were brass. He says he doesn't want to use iron cause it would rust in the damp basement but he is probably just being considerate of Bast. Is brass known to have any special properties? I can't remember now...


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments Hmm... I forgot about the strawberry wine. It was brass or copper- for me the notion started in elodins cell. It was used to some affect to lock up namers. So I assumed there are properties or a way to utilize it to hamper or impede namers sympathist .


message 36: by Manda (new)

Manda | 115 comments Yeah, I believe they put copper wire in the walls of Elodin's cell. Google tells me that brass is about 67% copper so it might have some of the same properties.


message 37: by thistlepong, Master Namer (new)

thistlepong | 340 comments Mod
If alloys had the same effect, it should have both made more sense and been cheaper to use them in Elodin's cell. So I kind of doubt the barrels have anything to do with naming. On the other hand if he's expecting Stercus brass makes perfect sense.


message 38: by Manda (new)

Manda | 115 comments Wait, what? You lost me with that last bit, Thistlepong.


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments shit happens ;)


message 40: by Manda (new)

Manda | 115 comments Haha, ok thanks.


message 41: by thistlepong, Master Namer (new)

thistlepong | 340 comments Mod
Well, I'm missing a comma, but referencing "Stercus in the thrall of iron," assuming that's the Chandrian who rusts pumps and wagon wheels and whatnot.

It's also latin for feces, as noted.


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments Oh, my. I believe you are correct.now I have something else to pick at... Cheers, Marek.


message 43: by Manda (new)

Manda | 115 comments Ah. Thank you, Thistle.


message 44: by Amber, Master Sympathist (new)

Amber (ivorydoom) | 1471 comments Mod
Let's put it this way. We've seen two days of customers at the inn and on one of those days he was recognized. That's a 50% chance of him being recognized by someone per day. But let's say that this was an unusual case. Ok. Let's say he only has a 10% chance of being recognized per day. That's a crazy high percentage for someone who claims they want to remain hidden. The logical conclusion? He doesn't really want to remain hidden.


The logical conclusion? LOL.

This is not a proper way to calculate percentages, you have completely ignored many of the variables required to make that percentage, thus making it speculative at best and the 10% a complete and utter guess.

With that reasoning I could say, Cinder get's shot with arrows 50% of the time he meets someone that recognizes him. But to be fair, we'll just call it 10%. Is that good with you?

We've witnessed two days of Kote's life at the Waystone, but you have to take into account the countless amount of day's he's been there without incident.
Not to mention the amount of traveller's who have passed through the Inn without noticing, vs the amount who have passed through and recognized him.
Not to mention the actions he's taking when recognized.

This is ultimately a story, so of course, if Kote is ever going to be recognized as Kvothe, it should happen within it. Putting a percentage like 50% on a plot driving scene is just taking it out of context.
Especially when everything else in the story points to him being able to hide his identity extremely well. So well that people refuse to even believe him.


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments so... you disagree, Amber? ;)


message 46: by Amber, Master Sympathist (last edited Apr 08, 2013 10:12AM) (new)

Amber (ivorydoom) | 1471 comments Mod
With that statement yes.

With the possiblity of a trap, not completely.

LOL.


message 47: by thistlepong, Master Namer (new)

thistlepong | 340 comments Mod
I kinda wanna throw some support Bill's way, here. The OP would have benefited from the inclusion of, "I think it's a trap," but that's where we're at anyway. It should be a trap. I agree.

I dunno how much of the OP directly supports that, though.
1. Baedn/Bredon is murky speculation motivated by what might be a false cognate. The larger concern, based on the best guess for Newarre's location, about setting up shop in Vintas holds.
2. Chronicler is meeting up with Skarpi in Treya. They split up so Devan could explore Bast's rumor. There's supposedly an additional chapter in the ARC describing this. They're traveling; Skarpi doesn't live there. Still, come day three, Skarpi's gonna be wondering where he is. And it just so happens he just flat out told Aaron he was Kvothe and Aaron's heading toward...
3. (and later posts) The arrival of the travelers following tge mounting of Folly is noted as odd within the text. It's not normal. An inn is an interesting compromise. It's defensible in case you're setting a trap and if you're concerned not just with yourself but something you're keeping in a trunk that weighs several hundred pounds. It's also great for keeping abreast of current events and stories. The name is st least clever, like Kote.


Servius  Heiner  | 178 comments Even though my personal theory fell to pieces- I still like the notion; that there is deliberate intent, with the selection of the inn. To what purpose, I do not fully know. Is there definitive tells in the story? There is so much information floating around. Much like a plate of spaghetti each thread leads to the other side, but it is a masterfully twisted path. I find it fulfilling to speculate- as it is most likely another year or two before I’ll know, I plan on speculating away the time.


message 49: by thistlepong, Master Namer (new)

thistlepong | 340 comments Mod
So, there's circumstantial stuff in the text. There's the coincidental timing between Devan, Skarpi, and Aaron. There's the confession to Aaron right before he leaves coupled with the explicit reminder about the bounty. There's the (corrosion resistant) barrel hoops and the brass locks on the doors. There's the setup of calling the true names of the Seven once already. There's the expectation of death.

Structurally there's a certain expectation of a few frame chapters at the end, a third (time pays for all) attack, and possibly even a large group coupled with handling the sword.

In a more esoteric sense, setting the frame in autumn gives it some literary alchemical heft and suggests the completion of the great work, closing the circle.


message 50: by Bill (last edited Apr 10, 2013 08:03PM) (new)

Bill thistlepong wrote: "3. (and later posts) The arrival of the travelers following tge mounting of Folly is noted as odd within the text. It's not normal. An inn is an interesting compromise. It's defensible in case you're setting a trap and if you're concerned not just with yourself but something you're keeping in a trunk that weighs several hundred pounds. It's also great for keeping abreast of current events and stories. The name is st least clever, like Kote. "

I realize that travelers in Newarre are rare. However, the inn is still the most likely place travelers will pass through. Given that there is likely only one inn in Newarre, and it's almost assured that anyone passing through will see Kvothe. Thus making it a uniquely horrible choice for someone who genuinely wants to remain hidden.

*And for those arguing with this position: Almost any other business would set Kvothe up with more privacy than an innkeeper. It honestly amazes me that people take issue with this.

Edit: He is also independently wealthy, so has no need for the almost non-existent income the Waystone provides. He could simply have built a house and lived the life of a recluse. He also could have disguised himself and his extremely famous red hair. Had he wanted news, he could have sent Bast to an inn to lounge about gathering information. But he does none of these things *because he wants to be found.*


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