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Book Talk > Pet Peeves

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message 1: by JP (new)

JP Reads (jpfantasyreads) | 787 comments Mod
What sort of things bother you the most when you're reading a book? (besides grammatical errors as those tend to bother everyone)

... Do you hate chapters that are too long or too short? Do you dislike first person or third person POVs? Do you get annoyed if a character is too sarcastic or uses humor at inappropriate times? Do you prefer sex scenes that are graphic or hate when there's too much detail? ...

I would love to hear about your pet peves when it comes to books =)


message 2: by Sara (new)

Sara | 75 comments Excessively long description of food, clothes, or a location. Examples for clothes would be Robert Jordan and food for George RR Martin. Love both men's writing but I skim through those parts so I can get to the dialogue or action.


message 3: by Brianna (new)

Brianna | 64 comments I'm odd and don't really like third-person point of view. I'm trying to read more books with it, though.


message 4: by Sara (new)

Sara | 75 comments The disappointing reads thread reminded me of my number one pet peeve - time travel. It always leads to the "what came first - the chicken or the egg" question. How can a character alter an action in the past when it had to happen in order for the character go into the past? Hate it, hate it, hate it.


message 5: by Megan (new)

Megan | 21 comments Info dumping. A skilled author knows how to be concise, and can weave important details into the plot over time. What reader wants the entire answer to the mystery dropped in their lap at the very end anyways? I find it much more satisfying to put the pieces together gradually and come up with my own theories while reading anyways. I also tend to roll my eyes at monloguing villains.


message 6: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) My biggest pet peeve used to be first person POV. I could never identify with the main character when reading because the "I" persona was "speaking" in my head with my voice. However, audiobooks have solved this problem for me because the story is being told to me and I have the narrator's voice in my head rather than my own.


message 7: by Brianna (new)

Brianna | 64 comments Interesting, because that's how I am with third-person point of view. I can never identify with it. Sure, I've read some books with it that I've loved, but I definitely have a preference for first-person.


message 8: by Nicholas (new)

Nicholas Forristal (nicholasforristal) | 4 comments Sara wrote: "The disappointing reads thread reminded me of my number one pet peeve - time travel. It always leads to the "what came first - the chicken or the egg" question. How can a character alter an actio..."

it depends what theory you agree to (or the author for that matter). For example - the many worlds theory is the concept of alternate timelines. so, it really wouldn't matter if you went back and killed yourself b/c it's not your timeline you are messing with.

to clean that idea up further, I've been also stating you would not only have to be able to time travel, but you would also have to be able to anchor yourself to your own reality, otherwise you are getting tossed around from one time line to another (sort of like in Slaughterhouse 5, but much worse).

Based on that idea, if you did go back and time and say...killed yourself, it really wouldn't matter b/c obviously for something like to happen (and not be a paradox) you would have to come from an alternate timeline. so, assuming you were anchored to begin with, you went back to your time then nothing would change for you.

I hope that at least clears up ONE idea of time travel. I can't you with the others b/c most of the time the authors do a terrible job of explaining it.


message 9: by Nicholas (new)

Nicholas Forristal (nicholasforristal) | 4 comments My pet peeve is dialogue in the middle of a long description. If it's more than a couple sentences, then the dialogue should be separated.

I've never been bothered much by poor grammar. If it's REALLY bad, sure, of course, but if it's a comma here or a misplaced this or that I really don't care. I think it's because I came from a technical writing background and then got into fiction. The grammatical rules change in odd places between those two, so as long as I can follow the sentence, it hardly matters to me.


message 10: by Sara (new)

Sara | 75 comments Nicholas,

That helps a bit. I've resigned myself to the fact that time travel will always make my head hurt.


message 11: by Leigh Neely (new)

Leigh Neely Jacki wrote: "What sort of things bother you the most when you're reading a book? (besides grammatical errors as those tend to bother everyone)

... Do you hate chapters that are too long or too short? Do you di..."


Bad writing is the only thing that trips me up. You have to hold my interest and keep the plot entertaining. Otherwise, I'm going to put it down and move on. My TBR pile is too big to waste time.


message 12: by Ozsaur (new)

Ozsaur Jacki wrote: "What sort of things bother you the most when you're reading a book? (besides grammatical errors as those tend to bother everyone)

... Do you hate chapters that are too long or too short? Do you di..."


Endless descriptions of the characters, especially how hot they are, or their gorgeous hair, their sexy bodies. So annoying. Please, writers, just get on with the story.


message 13: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) Sara wrote: "The disappointing reads thread reminded me of my number one pet peeve - time travel. It always leads to the "what came first - the chicken or the egg" question. How can a character alter an actio..."

Time travel has never been a favorite of mine either because of the inherent paradoxes and resolutions that required convoluted and unrealistic explanation. That said, I do like Karen Marie Moning's Highlanders series as the time travel plays a very small role and the explanations make sense and are satisfying.


message 14: by Reggie (last edited Mar 14, 2013 02:21PM) (new)

Reggie (OriginalPuck) | 19 comments Let's see here:

When it comes to romance: I am so sick of heterosexual love triangles, I just can't anymore. If I get even a hint that the book is going to go there, I won't read it (or will put it aside for later). I also get bored of constant descriptions of how hot/perfect/attractive/soul mate-y a character is, and will actively skim them if they happen too frequently.

Plot-wise, I'm also sick of the heroine constantly either being raped, having been raped in her past, or having to deal with the threat of it. It's one of the reasons I've put a few series on hold. I understand that rape happens, and that it's a serious issue, I just wish it wasn't one of the default go-tos for authors that want to add some angst.

A writing pet peeve is head hopping. I don't mind having different POVs, but I don't like switching them every few paragraphs, particularly when it gets to the point where who's thinking what is downright confusing.

One of my other pet peeves is when an author is obviously setting the book up for sequels in a way that feels inauthentic. To be a bit more specific, I hate when authors include characters that are barely more than a name or spend endless time on side characters that have no bearing on the plot or subplots. You know the author is throwing them in so that later books can focus on them, but the thing is, I'm not reading their story yet, so let me focus on the story I AM trying to read. This happens to me most in PNR, but I've seen it on occasion in UF, too.

I mean, ahem. I'm not a picky reader, I don't know what you're talking about. ;)


message 15: by Katherine (new)

Katherine (masquerader888) | 14 comments I dislike being put in the villain's head. Most of the time it feels to me like bathing in raw sewage and is a real deal-breaker if done too often or for extended periods of time.
The only author I have read that manged to pull this off and not make me feel a bit mind-raped was Ilona Andrews in the Edge series. Whether this was because of the fabric of the villain, a mix of loyal and crazy that wasn't just a pit of evil that I find so distasteful to be made to experience first hand, or just a better fit of author for me is still up-in-the-air. However, when reading other authors who include a villain POV I rarely manage to wade through the chapters of ick to finish the book; I simply do not want that much dark and evil to find a home in my head.


message 16: by Reggie (new)

Reggie (OriginalPuck) | 19 comments Katherine wrote: " However, when reading other authors who include a villain POV I rarely manage to wade through the chapters of ick to finish the book; I simply do not want that much dark and evil to find a home in my head. "

This happens a lot to me when it comes to mysteries, as well as UF and PNR. I don't like the icky feeling of reading all of that evil, either. It just makes me feel kinda gross, and severely uncomfortable. Good to know that the Edge series makes it work, though. I'll have to check it out.


message 17: by Katherine (new)

Katherine (masquerader888) | 14 comments Morgan wrote: This happens a lot to me when it comes to mysteries, as well as UF and PNR. I don't like the icky feeling of reading all of that evil, either. It just makes me feel kinda gross, and severely uncomfortable. Good to know that the Edge series makes it work, though. I'll have to check it out.

Glad to know I'm not the only one who has a problem with vicarious evil. :)


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