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Divine Comedy, Dante > Paradiso 32: The Petals of the Rose

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message 1: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Hicks (goodreadscomlaurele) | 2438 comments Hollander:


Summary of Canto: Par XXXII

THE EMPYREAN

1-3 Bernard, still fixed on (1) Mary, assumes the role of teacher and names some inhabitants of Paradise:
4-6 (2) [Eve] (her original sin sealed and healed by Mary)
7-9 (3) Rachel and (4) Beatrice
10-12 (5) Sarah, (6) Rebecca, (7) Judith, and [David]'s great-grandmother, (8) [Ruth]
13-15 moving downward in the "petals" of the rose
16-24 from Ruth on down more Hebrew women marking off the OT side of the rose, those who believed in Christ to come;
25-27 the NT side, where there are vacancies, in Christ come
28-33 and where we see (9) John the Baptist in the first tier;
34-36 (10) Francis, (11) Benedict, (12) Augustine, and others;
37-39 God's providence seen in so equal a division of the Rose;
40-48 all the lower half is children, saved by merit of others
49-51 Bernard sees that Dante is confused about this merit
52-66 Bernard: "Differences here reflect not merit but grace; 67-75 "think of [Jacob and Esau];
all these children are sorted not by their works but by their capacity to see God:
76-78 "from [Adam to Abraham]: faith of parents saved them
79-81 "from Abraham to Christ: circumcision
82-84 "from Christ to now: baptism
85-87 "look on the face [Mary's] that most resembles Christ's";
88-93 this greatest similarity to God yet experienced by Dante
94-99 an angel [Gabriel] opens his wings and sings; the court of Heaven, replying, sings in rapture
100-106 Dante replies: gratitude and a question (about the angel)
107-108 simile: morning star to sun as Bernard to Mary
109-114 Bernard identifies Gabriel (still by periphrasis)
115-117 Bernard continues to identify the blessed:
118-126 (13) [Adam], (14) [Peter]
127-132 (15) [John], (16) [Moses]
133-135 (17) Anne
136-138 (18) Lucy
139 Bernard: "Since the time before your rapture grows short
140-141 (simile) "we must stop, as a tailor prepares his cloth;
142-144 "it is now time to penetrate God's effulgence;
145-150 "for that, prayer to Mary is necessary; you should rehearse my words within you."
151 Bernard's prayer:

Ave Maria:

http://www.worldofdante.org/pop_up_qu...


message 2: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 5062 comments http://www.lockportstreetgallery.com/...

Dali_Paradiso_32

Salvador Dali: Paradiso Canto 32. “The Archangel Gabriel.”


message 3: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 5062 comments (Clearer?) http://www.worldofdante.org/media/ima...

Botticelli_Paradiso_Canto_32_Celestial_Rose

Sandro Botticelli: Paradiso Canto XXXII.1 “The Empyrean: St. Bernard of Clairvaux Explains the Divisions of the Celestial Rose; Dante's Vision of the Virgin Mary.” c.1480 - c.1495. Drawing.

(Last Botticelli illustration.)


message 4: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 5062 comments http://www.worldofdante.org/media/ima...

Flaxman_Paradise_Canto_32.1_St._Bernard

John Flaxman: Paradiso Canto XXX.II. “St. Bernard Contemplates Glory of the Virgin.” 1793. Engraving.

“San Bernardo (b. 1091 – d. 1153): Famous abbot of Clairvaux and advocate of the disastrous Second Crusade. His theological writings are known for his devotion to the Virgin Mary. St. Bernard's most famous work is his series of homilies on the Song of Songs (Song of Solomon) in which he develops the theme of mystical love between God and the soul.”


message 5: by Adelle (new)

Adelle | 3130 comments I've still a little ways to go,

But even now, unfinished, I would like to say thank you to Laurel and
thank you to Lily.


message 6: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 5062 comments Adelle wrote: "I've still a little ways to go,

But even now, unfinished, I would like to say thank you to Laurel and
thank you to Lily."


I hope our conversation can continue for awhile. As you can guess, this journey has become a personal one for me, and now I want to finish a few illustrations and return to the text. My thanks are to you if you have in any ways found the works of these artists a useful add to your reading, even if sometimes to elicit, "what in the world?" or even "so what?"


message 7: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Hicks (goodreadscomlaurele) | 2438 comments Lily wrote: "http://www.worldofdante.org/media/ima...



John Flaxman: Paradiso Canto XXX.II. “St. Bernard Contemplates Glory of the Virgin.” 1793. Engraving.

“San Bernardo (b. 10..."


Bernard wrote some very beautiful hymns. I always wondered how he could write "Jesus the very Thought of Thee" and then send people off on a crusade.

http://www.cyberhymnal.org/bio/b/e/r/...


message 8: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Hicks (goodreadscomlaurele) | 2438 comments Adelle wrote: "I've still a little ways to go,

But even now, unfinished, I would like to say thank you to Laurel and
thank you to Lily."


Thanks for your contributions, Adelle. At least we'll be able to say we have read all three books. Next time through, we'll know them a little better.


message 9: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 5062 comments For Paradiso Canto XXXII image from the Bodleian Library 14th century manuscript try this:

http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwms...

Paradiso_Canto_32_Virgin_in_rose

Paradiso Canto XXXII. “The Virgin in the Centre of the Rose, Surrounded by Saints and Children in the Petals; Angels and Empty Thrones.”


message 10: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 5062 comments http://www.worldofdante.org/media/ima...

Yates_Paradiso_Canto_32.28_Virgin

Giovanni di Paolo: Paradiso Canto XXXII.28. “Virgin and Child in the Celestial Rose.” c.1450. Manuscript illumination. Yates Thompson 36. British Library.


message 11: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 5062 comments http://etcweb.princeton.edu/dante/pdp...

Nattini_Paradiso_Canto_32

Amos Nattini: Paradiso Canto XXXII. "Affetto al suo piacer, quel contemplante 1923. (First line. In Hollander translation, that becomes “Absorbed in his delight, that man of contemplation…”)


message 12: by Jeremy C. Brown (new)

Jeremy C. Brown | 163 comments Laurele wrote: "Bernard wrote some very beautiful hymns. I always wondered how he could write "Jesus the very Thought of Thee" and then send people off on a crusade."

That's an interesting thought, and it's hard for me to understand too. I wonder if they used the old testament stories like Moses and Joshua conquering the land of Canaan as justification for their own acts? Still pretty crazy to think about.


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