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Marguerite Young
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message 1: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments May Marguerite Young be no longer BURIED. Presently, The Brain Pain group is reading her meganovel Miss MacIntosh, My Darling.


message 2: by Jim (new)

Jim Yes, mAY Ms. Marguerite Young be unBURIED and soon.

I'm reading the two-volume Dalkey Archive edition (600 pages each)

Miss MacIntosh, My Darling 1
Miss MacIntosh, My Darling 2

It's dense, imaginative, evocative, and many other 'tives. It isn't a book that the average reader would consider a pleasure read, hence its BURIED condition, but it is a major pleasure to read for lovers of language and myth and deep psychology.


message 3: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Even more BURIED than Miss MacIntosh is Marguerite Young's creative/imaginative biography/encomium of Eugene Debs, an important American socialist organizer and politician whom HISTORY has also BURIED. Cf, Kurt Vonnegut, also, for the importance of Debs. Young's book is Harp Song for a Radical: The Life and Times of Eugene Victor Debs. The wikipedia on Debs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugene_Debs


message 4: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments I got a review up for Young's Harp Song:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... And I now have a copy of her Miss MacIntosh to which it may be some time until I come. It is a massive-looking kind of novel, but I suspect that Harp Song will work as a good lead-in into what Miss MacIntosh is.


message 5: by Rand (new)

Rand (iterate) | 99 comments After perusing Young's wiki I noticed that Goodreads has omitted her first two books.
So I added them. Could not figure out how to upload cover images; there are some nice shots on this here website (which has both volumes of poetry for sale & is run by a former ABAA president && is illustrated with fun cartoons!)
.


message 6: by Rand (new)

Rand (iterate) | 99 comments also: this earthlink site has a very nice memorial to Young, with links to different folks reading selected chapters of Miss Macintosh, My Darling and a brief synopsis of that book.

AND a lovely song-homage for that book.

&& tomorrow (August 26th) is Young's birthday.

for the sake of preservation, here's the Young bibliography found on that earthlink site:

Burke, Kenneth. 1945. "The Work of Regeneration." The Kenyon Review 7.4:696-700.

Byatt, A. S. 1978. "Women Writers in America." Harpers & Queen Int'l. July 1978:71.
____________. 1966. "The Obsession with Amorphous Mankind: Marguerite Young's Strange Bestseller." Encounter 27:63-69.

Cohen, Lisa. 1994. "The Long Goodbye: Rediscovering Marguerite Young." Village Voice Literary Supplement. October 1994:9-11.

Dudar, Helen. 1985. "Marguerite Young: A Literary Vocation." The Wall Street Journal. 25 March 1985:20.

Duncan, Erika. 1984. "Marguerite Young." In Unless Soul Clap Its Hands, 3-16. NY: Schocken Books. Reprint of "The Literary Life and How It's Lived: A Reminiscence with Marguerite Young." Book Forum (1977) 3:426-35.

Durand, Régis. 1975. "La fabrique de la fiction: lecture du roman de Marguerite Young, Miss MacIntosh, My Darling." Caliban 12:45-60. Series: Annales Universitae de Toulouse.

Edelstein, J. M. 1965. Review of Miss MaIntosh My Darling. The New Republic October 1965:28. See response by Ned O'Gorman in "The Dark Angel."

Eichenlaub, Constance. 1998. "Aporias of Reception." Chapter 4 of "The Practice of Inner Sense: Redirection in an Age of Negative Aesthetics." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, Seattle.

Fuchs, Miriam, editor. 1994. Marguerite Young, Our Darling: Tributes and Essays. Normal, IL: Dalkey Archive Press.
___________, and Friedman, E. G.,eds. 1989(1). Breaking the Sequence: Women's Experimental Fiction. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
___________. 1989(2). "Marguerite Young's Miss MacIntosh My Darling: Liquescence as Form." In Breaking the Sequence, 188-98.
___________, and Friedman, E. G. 1989(3). "A Conversation with Marguerite Young." Rev. of Contemporary Fiction 9:147-54.
___________. 1989(4) . "Marguerite Young's Utopias: 'The Most Beautiful Music [They] Had Never Heard'." Rev. of Contemporary Fiction 9:166-76.

Gardner, John. 1967. "An Invective Against Mere Fiction." The Southern Review III.2:444-67.

Goyen, William. 1965. "A Fable of Illusion and Reality." NY Times Book Review 12 Sept. 1965:5.

Hauser, Marianne. 1967. "The Crucial Flower." Sewanne Review 75:731-40.

Ingalls, Jeremy. 1945(1). "Bishop Berkeley and the Whales." Review of Moderate Fable in Poetry: A Magazine of Verse LXV.4:215-18.
_______________. 1945(2). Review of Angel in the Forest in Accent: A Quarterly of New Literature V.4:246-48.

Lebowitz, Martin. 1945. "Work of Art." Review of Angel in the Forest. The Nation 160, 12 May 1945:547.

Lerman, Leo. 1965. Short article with excerpts from Miss MacIntosh, My Darling and the essay "Inviting the Muses." Mademoiselle, Sept. 1965:192ff.

McEvilly, W. 1969. "The Philosopher without Answers: A Look at Metaphysics and Marguerite Young." Studies in the Twentieth Century 3:73-81.

Neville, Susan. 1995. "Where the Landscape Moved Like Waves: An Interview with Marguerite Young." Arts Indiana 17.3:20-23.

Newquist, Roy. 1967. "Marguerite Young." In Conversations, 496-505. NY: Rand McNally & Co..

Nin, Anais. 1982. The Diary of Anais Nin, Volume 7. Gunther Stuhlmann, ed. NY: Harvest/Harcourt Brace & Co. See "Index" for references to Marguerite Young passim.
__________. 1976. The Diary of Anais Nin, Volume 6. Gunther Stuhlmann, ed. NY: Harvest/Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Publishers. See "Index" for references to Marguerite Young passim.
__________. 1974. The Diary of Anais Nin, Volume 5. Gunther Stuhlmann, ed. NY: Harvest/Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Publishers. See reference in the Spring of 1955, p. 237, to Nin's first meeting with M. Young through their mutual acquaintance, Lawrence Maxwell.
"The Issue of Marguerite Young." Under the Sign of Pisces: Anaïs Nin and Her Circle. Fall, 1974, Vol. 5.4. Includes updates on projects, reviews, and four short essays: Erika Duncan, "The Shadows in Miss Macintosh My Darling." Honey Rovit, "The Private and the Public Marguerite Young." Charles Ruas, "Miss MacIntosh, My Darling: The Reading Experience." Leslie B. Tanner, "The Teachings of Marguerite Young."

O'Gorman, Ned. 1966. "The Dark Angel." Review of Angel in the Forest in The New Republic 12 March 1966:25-27.

Ruas, Charles. 1999. Editor, Marguerite Young, Harp Song for a Radical: The Life and Times of Eugene Victor Debs. NY: Alfred A. Knopf.
_____________. 1996. Essay about his friendship with Anais Nin and Marguerite Young. In Recollections of Anais Nin, ed. Benjamin Franklin V, 132-137. Athens: Ohio University Press.
_____________. 1994. "Marguerite Young and the Epic Imagination." In Marguerite Our Darling: Tributes and Essays, ed. Miriam Fuchs, 80-84. Normal, IL: Dalkey Archive Press.
_____________. 1985. "Marguerite Young." In Conversations with American Writers, 91-127. NY: Alfred A. Knopf. Interview explores her life, personality, her vision of the United States, and her ongoing work on the biography of Eugene Victor Debs.
_____________. 1977. Interview with Marguerite Young in The Paris Review, 71:58-75.

Shaviro, Steve. 1990. "Lost Chords and Interrupted Births: Marguerite Young's Exorbitant Vision." Critique 31:213-22.
___________. 1989. "Exorbitance and Death: Marguerite Young's Vision." Rev. of Contemporary Fiction 9:191-197. Reprinted 1994 in Marguerite Our Darling, ed. M. Fuchs.

Staley, R. Eric. 1993. "No Landscape But The Soul's: A Critical Study of the Work of Marguerite Young." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Missouri-Columbia.

Swallow, Alan, ed. 1944. American Writing 1943 . Boston: Bruce Humphries, Inc. Publishers. Includes "Winter Scene" and honor roll mention of 11 of Young's 1942 poems published in the Southern Review, Poetry, Accent, Kenyon Review, American Prefaces.
_______________. 1943. American Writing 1942. Boston: Bruce Humphries, Inc. Publishers. Young's poem, "Summer Day," published in the Kenyon Review, Summer, 1941 is included in Honor Roll.

Thompson, Heidi. 1996. "Young/Labyrinth," in "Uroboros: Visions of the Androgyne (Virginia Woolf, Djuna Barnes, Marguerite Young, Alice Walker, Kathy Acker)." 237-91. Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Washington, Seattle.

Young, Marguerite. 1999(1). Harp Song for a Radical: The Life and Times of Eugene Victor Debs. New York: Alfred A. Knopf Publisher.
_______________. 1999(2). "Black Widow." Excerpt from Harp Song for a Radical. In Conjunctions 33.
_______________. 1994(1). Inviting the Muses: Stories, Essays, Reviews. Normal, IL: Dalkey Archive Press.
_______________. 1994(2). Angel in the Forest: A Fairy Tale of Two Utopias, 2nd edition. Normal IL: Dalkey Archive Press. First published in 1945 by Reynal and Hitchock.
_______________. 1993. Miss MacIntosh, My Darling. Normal, IL: Dalkey Archive Press. First published in 1965 by Scribner's.
_______________. 1989. "From Prelude in the Golden Key: The Life and Times of Eugene Victor Debs." Rev. of Contemporary Fiction 9:155-63.
_______________. 1979. Miss MacIntosh, My Darling. NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Harvest Series.
_______________. 1966(1). Miss MacIntosh, My Darling. London: Peter Owen.
_______________. 1966(2). Angel in the Forest: A Fairy Tale of Two Utopias. London: Peter Owen.
_______________. 1966(3). Angel in the Forest: A Fairy Tale of Two Utopias. New York: Scribners.
_______________. 1965. Miss MacIntosh, My Darling. New York: Scribners.
_______________. 1954. "No Old Maid's Romance." In Western Review 4, Vol. 18. 291-314.
_______________. 1950(1). "The Doll People." In Mademoiselle.
_______________. 1950(2). "Horse Utopia." In Flair.
_______________. 1948(1). "Mr. Bonebreaker." In Bazaar February Issue.
_______________. 1948(2). "The Arctic Explorer at the Stock Exchange." In Tiger's Eye 6:1-13.
_______________. 1947(1). Poem in Tiger's Eye 1:40-41.
_______________. 1947(2). "Illusion is the Key: About our Elegantly Mental Young Writers and their Dealings with Illusion." Vogue 15 January 1947:84-85, 134.
_______________. 1945(1). Angel in the Forest: A Fairy Tale of Two Utopias. NY: Reynal and Hitchcock.
_______________. 1945(2). "Of Deed, Love, Death." Kenyon Review, Vol. VII, Winter:69-70.
_______________. 1944(1). Moderate Fable. Cornwall, NY: Reynal & Hitchcock.
_______________. 1944(2). "Old James." In Kenyon Review VI (Winter):73-90. Reprinted in the 1944 O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories, eds. H. Brickell and M. Fuller. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1944. pp. 234-50.
_______________. 1944(3). "Winter Scene." In American Writing 1943, ed. A. Swallow, 137. Poem also in Moderate Fable.
_______________. 1943(1). Short Story "Dead Women." In American Prefaces 8.3:243-48, eds. Paul Engle and Jean Garrigne. University of Iowa.
_______________. 1943(2). "Noah's Ark" In American Prefaces 8.4:308, eds. Paul Engle and Jean Garrigne. University of Iowa.
______________. 1942(1). Six poems in Southern Review, Spring:852-55. All six poems later included in Moderate Fable.
______________. 1942(2). "A Crystal Principle" and "Moderate Fable" in Kenyon Review IV (Autumn):358-60. Both poems included in Moderate Fable.
_______________. 1940. "Ventriloquist: The Coffee Hour." Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, 56:132-34. Poem is included in Moderate Fable.
_______________. 1937(1). Prismatic Ground. NY: The Macmillan Co.. Reviewed by Jessica Nelson North, Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, 51:109-11.
_______________. 1937(2). Six poems in Poetry: A Magazine of Verse. 49:315-19. All six poems are included in Prismatic Ground.
_______________. 1930. "Ballad-Loving," "Lot's Wife," "A Girl's Song," "Recurring." Poetry: A Magazine of Verse. 36:260-62. All four poems are later included in Prismatic Ground.

Biographical information for Marguerite Young can be found in the following references.

Available on cassette tape from The American Audio Prose Library (www.americanaudioprose.com): May 1983 interview in New York City by Kay Bonetti, and readings by Marguerite Young from Miss MaIntosh My Darling.

World Authors, 1950-1970. Ed. J. Wakeman, 1584-86. NY: The W. H. Wilson Co., 1975.

Contemporary Authors, permanent series Vol. I. Ed. C. D. Kinsman, 694-95. Detroit: Gale Research, 1975.

Contemporary Authors, Vol. 150. Ed. K. Edgar, 483. Detroit: Gale Research, 1996.

American Women Writers, Vol. 4. Ed. Tina Mainiero, 488-89. NY: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co., 1982. Entry written by Lorene Pouncey.

Contemporary Novelists (1972, 1975 1982). Eds. J. Vinson, et. al. NY: Macmillan. Entries written by William Goyen.

Contemporary Literary Criticism, Vol. 82. 394-421. Detroit: Gale Research, Inc., 1994.

Writer's Directory. St. James Press, 1994.


message 7: by Eric (new)

Eric | 57 comments hey, who's in for jumping this thing come twenty-fourteen? Just got mine and well why not?


message 8: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Eric wrote: "hey, who's in for jumping this thing come twenty-fourteen? Just got mine and well why not?"

It will be happening. And I'm working on it. One of those two.


message 9: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Nathan "N.R." wrote: "It will be happening. And I'm working on it. One of those two. "

Okay, so the former of the two (and the second of the two) ; or if nothing happens, there will exist a giant internet cavity for inwhich it to not happen.

Miss MacIntosh/Marguerite Young reading group will be on its way later this week/month. Get yourselves your copies loaded ; it's always xmas for bookish=folk.


message 10: by Larou (last edited Dec 05, 2013 05:54AM) (new)

Larou | 21 comments Nice. I started reading it for Brain Pain and am still at it - kind of, the reading progress has.... slowed down somewhat. To what is actually a glacial pace. Still, I'm refusing to give up on it yet (and am even enjoying it, kind of, every time I can get myself to dip into it again) so will probably join as well. If only to snicker sarcastically while I watch everyone's hopes of ever finishing this being novel being smashed to pieces on the cliffs of its utter weirdness and complete lack of narrative or any other kind of noticeable progress... *cue evil cackle*


message 11: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Larou wrote: "Nice. I started reading it for Brain Pain and am still at it - kind of, the reading progress has.... slowed down somewhat. To what is actually a glacial pace. "

Yep. This is my understanding. I can guarantee one thing : we will have no reading schedule. [Jim said he may join us as well] But meanwhile, I've been reading all these itty-bitty quicky books lately and I'm about burning up to read something that is not a page-turner.


message 12: by Jim (new)

Jim Larou wrote: "Nice. I started reading it for Brain Pain and am still at it - kind of, the reading progress has.... slowed down somewhat. To what is actually a glacial pace. Still, I'm refusing to give up on it y..."

It was tough, wasn't it? Beautiful prose, but so dense it was like trying to swim through chunky peanut butter. Will try again with the new group.


message 13: by Larou (new)

Larou | 21 comments Jim wrote: " Beautiful prose, but so dense it was like trying to swim through chunky peanut butter."

Indeed, a density that you usually find in prose poems - which tend to be only be a couple of pages long, or at the most of novella length. I think that's why everyone reading along in the Brain Pain group was so enthusiastic at first, but found it hard going the longer it lasted. I'm seriously very curious how things will work out here.


message 14: by MJ (last edited Dec 05, 2013 11:39AM) (new)

MJ Nicholls (mjnicholls) | 209 comments Miss McIntosh probably outdoes The Making of Americans on the brain pain front. I read fifteen pages, and found the prose to have a prose-poem quality at times . . . I also found a lot of sloppy unlyrical repetitive top-of-the-head stuff and that seemed to engulf the good bits. (And no humour whatsoever).


message 15: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments This Miss MacIntosh, My Darling reading group is now active :: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...


message 16: by Thomas (new)

Thomas | 54 comments hello, i'm reading this long ass book, it's very cool as of page 400 or so. upthread someone said it didn't have any humour, and I guess it's not a 'funny book' really, but some of the stuff with Mr Spitzer contemplating his pathetic failed life is pretty funny.


message 17: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Thomas wrote: "Mr Spitzer"

Indeed. I found Mr Spitzer a bit of a cut up. Poor guy.


message 18: by Vrixton (new)

Vrixton Phillips (sirredcrosse) | 3 comments In other Young news, I recently obtained a shiny new copy of Angel in the Forest: A Fairy Tale of Two Utopias and had the strange dilemma of not knowing whether to shelve it in my room with the fiction or in my office (which houses nonfiction, drama & poetry)
I suppose I'll find out when I read it. I'd still like to get her biofantasia of Debs along with a proper, normal biography.


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