Complaint Department discussion

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message 5901: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Hate glasses.

As a lifelong (forced to) hard contact lens wearer, why because I'm growing older should I have to resort to reading glasses on top of the contacts!


message 5902: by Eric (last edited Sep 17, 2014 02:04PM) (new)

Eric Westfall (eawestfall) | 369 comments Perhaps our moderators should start a Heavenly Complaint Department? That might draw the attention of Her, Him, It, Whoever, Whatever On High. We could all look upwards (or for any who don't quite believe, perhaps sideways) as we click Send on our complaints.

Unfortunately, your complaint...about which I deeply sympathize...but having been a lifelong glasses wearer (scratched cornea from contact lens, never again), is just about a function of age. >a teasing duh!< And since they haven't managed bifocal/trifocal contacts yet, not much any of us can do.

I actually have two sets of glasses. I'm basically near-sighted, but with the onset of age and the necessity for working on a computer to earn a living and/or to write, some years ago I figured out that if I sat up properly in my chair, and stretched my arm out, palm up and out, my palm would just touch the screen.

So I asked the ophthalmologist (sp?), in addition to my bifocal glasses for ordinary wear, to give me a "middle distance" prescription for the computer. I buy the cheapest plastic lenses and cheapest frames, and keep the current version by the computer.

Works for me.

Anyway...here's a >cyber-hug< for your sorrows.

Eric


message 5903: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments Thank you Eric. :-)


message 5904: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Eric wrote: "having been a lifelong glasses wearer (scratched cornea from contact lens, never again) ..."

I have to complain that I've had no alternative to hard contacts (gas permeable) because they are the remedial correction for keracotonus.

In recent years the labs developed a soft lens finally, but they were not for me, oddly more uncomfortable and sightless than the hard ones…


message 5905: by Preston, Moderator (new)

Preston | 18461 comments Eric wrote: "Perhaps our moderators should start a Heavenly Complaint Department? That might draw the attention of Her, Him, It, Whoever, Whatever On High. We could all look upwards (or for any who don't quite ..."

Sounds like a job for someone more inspired than we are so I think you would be perfect to lead that group :-)


message 5906: by Preston, Moderator (new)

Preston | 18461 comments


I am filing a complaint that I didn't have to stay up late to see that Scotland voted to stay in the UK. The vote was over with before my bedtime.

Of course the Complaint Department avoids politics since it can cause ill will thus I assure everyone that I was 100 percent impartial on this issue. Roger can tell you just how impartial I was because I kept bombarding him with long diatribes on just how impartial I was in great detail with historical references. He will tell you I was passionate about my unbiased, equitable neutrality.



Congratulations United Kingdom!



message 5907: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments Our local PBS station carries BBC news but today it was all politics, with panels of experts and a man squatting about in what looked like a PowerPoint presentation on steroids.


message 5908: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Preston wrote: "Roger can tell you just how impartial I was because I kept bombarding him with long diatribes on just how impartial I was in great detail with historical references. He will tell you I was passionate about my unbiased, equitable neutrality. ..."

Your excessive unbiasedness has been entirely admirable, Preston, particularly in the face of Liverpudlian provocation that, as an American, you know nothing about anything :-))

It's nice to feel that so many Americans have expressed, if not outright sympathy for having to hold such a referendum, at least bewilderment. Now it looks as though the future of the United Kingdom might more resemble that of the US, or perhaps more accurately a cantonal system like the Swiss enjoy. (I'll have to ask Oliver about that).


message 5909: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments Roger wrote: "Preston wrote: "Roger can tell you just how impartial I was because I kept bombarding him with long diatribes on just how impartial I was in great detail with historical references. He will tell yo..."

Considering the press I've seen explaining the referendum, like Michael Strahan, American bewilderment is perfectly logical.


message 5910: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments Admittedly, on the emotional level, I am somewhat disappointed, but the more logical, down-to-earth side of me thinks this is for the best and wishes the whole of the UK the best. Does this mean there'll be more freedoms between all the countries?

And I agree with Averin. The reporting and attempts to explain just what it all meant or how it works was a bit convoluted.

Also, because it's Talk Like Pirate Day "Arrgh, me mateys, yer've done well."


message 5911: by Eric (new)

Eric Westfall (eawestfall) | 369 comments Okay, so I'm not even going to pretend to complain that The Rake, the Rogue and the Roue is now available at:

http://www.mmromancegroup.com/the-rak...

Feel free to assess four, five or six stars at your most immediate convenience. >g<

Eric


message 5912: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments Lori wrote: "Admittedly, on the emotional level, I am somewhat disappointed, but the more logical, down-to-earth side of me thinks this is for the best and wishes the whole of the UK the best. Does this mean th..."

I'll complain on behalf of those (like me) not near a Krispy Kreme, where in honor of Talk Like a Pirate Day, avasting yer mateys will get you a free doughnut http://www.krispykreme.com/pirate.


message 5913: by Preston, Moderator (new)

Preston | 18461 comments Lori wrote: "Does this mean there'll be more freedoms between all the countries?"

The short answer to your question is yes but much has to be negotiated for that to happen.

Scotland and Ireland have their own individual parliaments and Wales has a National Assembly. These lawmaking bodies can make laws on devolved matters. The UK Parliament (sometimes referred to as Westminster) can make laws on devolved matters but generally they don't. For an better explantation of how this works the Scottish Parliament's website has a good overview at: http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/vis...

During the campaigns to determine Scottish independence, UK Prime Minister David Cameron promised more devolved powers to Scotland's Parliament. In a speech Friday morning after the vote results were in Cameron promised “...powers over tax, spending and welfare...” would be agreed by November and legislation published by January. Those powers will come through more devolution from the central British government in Westminster to the Scottish Parliament.

It is generally thought that more centralized power in Britain's Parliament being turned over to the Scottish Parliament will eventually lead to demands for Ireland's Parliament and Wales' National Assembly to also have more devolved powers.

Some in England are asking the question why should Scotland's representatives in the House of Commons (MPs) be voting on matters pertaining only to England. People asking this question are suggesting that Scottish MPs should not be able to vote on matters that are "England only".

This is a bit of an oversimplification but probably more than you ever wanted to know.

If I am wrong on any of this I'm sure Roger or someone else in the UK will correct me.

I haven't figured out how the US federal government and States' Rights works yet so what do I know?


message 5914: by Roger (last edited Sep 20, 2014 12:16AM) (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments That's pretty spot on, Preston! Other than in the sentence "Some in England are asking the question why should Scotland's representatives in the House of Commons (MPs) be voting on matters pertaining only to England." I would now say it is a majority of people living in England (including those hundreds of thousands of Scots).

The problem comes for the Labour Party, as indeed it would had the Scots voted for independence, because Labour holds 41 parliamentary seats in Scotland. Come independence, Labour would have been wiped out in Westminster, along with the Conservatives' current coalition partners, the Liberal Democrats, who have 11 seats in Scotland. In the case of independence, those 52 members of parliament (MPs) would cease to exist, leaving prime minister David Cameron's Conservative Party with an unbeatable majority.

Now a similar thing will happen when it comes to the House of Commons voting on matter relating to England — the Scottish Labour and Lib. Dem MPs won't be able to vote; the Conservatives will always carry the vote. This is why the leader of the Labour Party, Ed Milliband, is trying to put a spanner in the works. He faces an unenviable task: delay the promises made to Scotland because the majority of opinion is that what's fair for Scotland must also be fair for England, and the Scots will have been "lied to" by the Unionist parties that made those promises Preston mentions. All he can do is try to argue that "Let's get Scotland sorted first and then see how people feel.

Fortunately (my opinion!), Ed is not a popular leader of his party, who assassinated his brother David (politically) when they went head to head to become Labour leader following the retirement of former prime minister Gordon Brown. Moderate David wanted Labour to continue along similar lines to the party/government of Blair and Brown; Ed enlisted the support of the most rabid unions to snatch the vote. Now he faces the possibility of an almost total wipeout.

And I'm sure that's much more than anyone wanted to know — apart from one item of possible interest raised as we waited for David Cameron to come out and address the nation from the front door of the seat of British administrative government, Britain's White House or Kremlin. What other developed nation has for its most important governmental building a relatively small Georgian house, in a small, nondescript street and it isn't even Number One Downing Street, but No. 10?


message 5915: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments Thank you both Preston and Roger. You clarified muddied things quite nicely. :-)


message 5916: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments There's a bit in Country Mouse where the Brit tells the Yank that Parliament is located next to the river because MPs know bloodthirsty citizens are always willing to burn the place down and the MPs want to be able to escape.


message 5917: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments LOL


message 5918: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments Grrr, I can't find the computer Complaint page. A pox on the knucklehead who hung up my Safari with "Windows Detected Security Error, Due to Suspicious Activity Found On Your Computer. Contact Windows Certified Live Technicians" on my Mac. Lost over an hour figuring out how to clear while having an important phone call from one of my sons' schools.


message 5919: by Hilary (new)

Hilary Evans (HilEvans83) | 121 comments I'm annoyed that after two weeks of looking forward to my husband being at a port where he can call and text, instead of just sending emails that take 24-48 hours to get sent, eight hours before he was supposed to get there I get an email saying he has duty the first day and probably won't get to talk until the next day??? Really??? He couldn't have mentioned that sooner....ugh...


message 5920: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments When did mod Boyd get a promotion to Hunky Hunk? Why wasn't there advance notice?


message 5922: by Boyd, Hunk of hunky burning passion (new)

Boyd (BoydWalker) | 2304 comments Averin wrote: "When did mod Boyd get a promotion to Hunky Hunk? Why wasn't there advance notice?"

Oh that's always been one of my many titles like my other favorite Official Gay Eye Candy :-)


message 5923: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Life is unfair, my former friend and a student with me at Hornsey College of Art, Lynsey de Paul died yesterday at 64. She may not have been a dedicated graphical artist but she did have a great singing voice, a ways with lyrics, and many hits. RIP Lynsey.


Ije the Devourer of Books | 8168 comments Sorry to hear that Roger xxx


message 5925: by Rick (new)

Rick | 9633 comments My condolences on the loss of your friend.


message 5926: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments My condolences, Roger. I know you've written about her before.


message 5927: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments I am sorry to hear that Roger. Hugs.


message 5928: by Preston, Moderator (new)

Preston | 18461 comments People living outside of the UK may not know Roger's friend and classmate in art school Lynsey de Paul was a chart topping singer in the 1970s and an award winning songwriter. In more recent times she appeared on television including the Stephen Fry series Kingdom. Although never married, at various times de Paul was romantically linked with Ringo Starr, Roy Wood, James Coburn, Sean Connery and Dudley Moore among others. She was a very close friend of Spike Mulligan and was known for her sense of humor.

See Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynsey_...

See BBC Obituary at: http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment...





message 5929: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Thank you for your thoughts. There is a Hornsey College of Art Facebook page, though most who pay attention to it are from well after my student time there (it became consumed by the vast and unsavory Middlesex University). Nevertheless, enough who were on the foundation course that year or the one after, remember Lynsey well and the thread ran to several posts. I felt it lost traction and direction after the student rebellion was squashed, so I left and took to movies instead.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsey_...


message 5930: by Preston, Moderator (new)

Preston | 18461 comments I felt it lost traction and direction after the student rebellion was squashed, so I left and took to movies instead...."

A good decision considering a gorgeous young Swiss student was also going to the same film school as you. He is a member of the Complaint Department as Zack but I'm fairly certain your Civil Union papers have his name as Oliver Frey. And the rest is history ♡


message 5931: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments ♡♡


message 5932: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments It's not fair that I have to fly to Milan for the coming weekend, all expenses paid to appear as a guest at Video Games Week–Milan.


message 5933: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments Roger wrote: "It's not fair that I have to fly to Milan for the coming weekend, all expenses paid to appear as a guest at Video Games Week–Milan."

You could always refuse to go. ;)


message 5934: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments Lori wrote: "Roger wrote: "It's not fair that I have to fly to Milan for the coming weekend, all expenses paid to appear as a guest at Video Games Week–Milan."

You could always refuse to go. ;)"


Yeah, isn't there flood damage you still need to clean up?


message 5935: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Hahaha… flood damage all done! No, it's a tough job flying to Milan for the weekend, but there it is. I suppose someone's got to do it.


message 5936: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments How grungy does it have to get to prove that the skies over Birmingham International Airport are grey and windy after a balmy sunny Milano?


message 5937: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments Punishment? ;}


message 5938: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Gee, thanks Lori! :-)


message 5940: by Lori S. (new)


message 5941: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Some might say "about time," but not everyone is given to riding on a charger into the fray; so if I were being moderately generous I might say "better late than never"; but I really think this is very brave of the man.


message 5942: by Eric (last edited Oct 31, 2014 06:27AM) (new)

Eric Westfall (eawestfall) | 369 comments Roger,

If your comments are about the Apple CEO coming out publicly, I agree about his bravery.

Frankly, I am more than fed up with those in the gay community who for all practical purposes insist that men and women who are prominent in any field...arts, scientific, business, whatever...somehow have a "duty" to come out, and a "duty" to be a role model.

BS

There is a significant difference between being privately "out" and publicly so. So what if you don't hide your queerosity? So what if your co-workers and friends and loved ones know? So what if it's an "open secret" in your industry? Utterly irrelevant.

Privately out, in my mind, occurs naturally from simply being who you are, from not changing pronouns when making a casual comment about who you're dating (as an old-fashioned example). Or other things that just occur in the normal ebb and flow of your life.

Publicly out is obviously a conscious choice. It's a decision that recognizes the truth that if you are a prominent person, making that fact known may well help others in a variety of ways...from starting to break down barriers (first openly gay football player, first openly gay basketball player), to helping someone young and perplexed/frightened to be less perplexed and less frightened, encouraged to believe, on a somewhat "personal" level that it is indeed possible for queers to achieve the highest levels of their aspirations.

But whether you, the public figure, make the announcement for ego purposes, or for altruistic purposes, should be considered solely a personal and private decision, and the arsewipes...to borrow a phrase...who believe/scream/rant otherwise, should be very politely told, in the most upper-class British tones possible (because put-downs are always best when spoken so) to "off". Preceded, of course, by the ever-popular f-word.

Or if you are particularly good with words, some alternative expression of your own devising.

Thus-sayeth-the-Eric (who is late starting to earn a living today and must begin that endeavor lest he have no money to buy books).


message 5943: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments Lovely Eric.


message 5944: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments Eric wrote: "Roger,

If your comments are about the Apple CEO coming out publicly, I agree about his bravery.

Frankly, I am more than fed up with those in the gay community who for all practical purposes insis..."


Hear, hear.


message 5945: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments Eric wrote: "Roger,

If your comments are about the Apple CEO coming out publicly, I agree about his bravery.

Frankly, I am more than fed up with those in the gay community who for all practical purposes insis..."


In complete agreement, and I did mean about his public statement; after all many in the gay global community who know anything about Apple knew that Tim was and is gay.

If you turn the argument slightly on its head, what about philanthropists who prefer to donate anonymously because they simply don't see it as being a matter for public scrutiny — and probably correctly fear that if they did shout out about their generosity they'd only be categorized as "show-offs."


message 5946: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments I hate harpoons that don't work properly and leave the little European space craft that landed on a comet 330 million miles away in limbo.


message 5947: by Lori S. (last edited Nov 13, 2014 07:23AM) (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments I love hate that the lander actually made it to the comet and has been transmitting cool pictures back to Earth. Oddly enough, the pictures look like they could have come from a mountain top ...


message 5948: by Roger (new)

Roger Kean | 15554 comments A-hah!, that's what they said of the Moon landings… all done in a studio with reeeeaally bad CGI :-)


message 5949: by Averin (new)

Averin | 1947 comments This morning's news has shots of bulldozers removing tons of snow in Buffalo (why is it always Buffalo?), while the local weather forecast gives us only a forty percent chance of rain tomorrow. But today's high will be almost 70ºF, we are in for a few days of 80s and the surf is up. Of course, we have water rationing so that cute surfer boy, riding the waves with his knobby feet etc., probably smells more than usual for lack (more than usual) of a shower.


message 5950: by Lori S. (new)

Lori S. (fuzzipueo) | 2457 comments All of your water went to the northeast.
Cold and clear here in Nuevo Mexico, all that snow avoiding us as usual.


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