The History Book Club discussion

205 views
ARCHIVE > G'S 50 BOOKS READ IN 2013

Comments Showing 1-50 of 124 (124 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3

message 1: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Here is your new thread for 2013.

Our Format:

JANUARY

1. My Early Life, 1874-1904 by Winston S. Churchill Winston S. Churchill Winston S. Churchill
Finish date: March 2008
Genre: (whatever genre the book happens to be)
Rating: A
Review: You can add text from a review you have written but no links to any review elsewhere even goodreads. And that is about it. Just make sure to number consecutively and just add the months.

Note: I will delete required format post once you get started.


message 2: by G (last edited Jan 18, 2013 07:12AM) (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments JANUARY

1. Caesar (Masters of Rome, #5) by Colleen McCullough by Colleen McCullough Colleen McCullough
Finish date: January 12, 2013
Genre: Historical Fiction
Rating: A-, B+

Review: Caesar by Colleen McCullough covers Julius Caesars military and political battles from Britain and Gaul back to Italy (after crossing the Rubicon, a shallow river, now lost) through his battles with Pompey and the Roman Civil War.

After the first book I read in this series (which was unfortunately not the actual first book of the series), I wondered if I could follow the battles, which make up the entire book.

I still have trouble with the names, but otherwise the book did flow, and while this was more dramatic than Caesar’s Women, it did not engage me continually. However, there were times, such as with the Britannic King Vercingertorix and at the siege of Alesia when you feel Caesars military brilliance and then you feel his fatigue at Pharsalus.

Because you know she has done her research, you have faith in McCullough’s characterizations of these iconic ancients. They become accessible. You cry with Fulvia and cringe at the death of certain people.

I am reading a biography of Thomas Jefferson and at one point, Alexander Hamilton (a mastermind of the American financial system) mockingly replies to Jefferson’s statement as to the greatest men in history: “The greatest man who ever lived was Julius Caesar.”

The man intrigued us 200 years before this book was written and McCullough perpetuates the fascination.


message 3: by G (last edited Jan 18, 2013 07:11AM) (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments JANUARY

2. The Murders of Richard III by Elizabeth Peters by Elizabeth Peters Elizabeth Peters

Finish date: January 13, 2013
Genre: Cozy Mystery
Rating: B+

Review: Fun! An excellent cozy is a reading gift. It takes us away and back again and we return all in one piece. This is a 4 star (or 7 star on a 10 pt scale) cozy mystery for me. There was no food, antiques, crafts or books - just a plain fun whodunit. I am not an especial fan of the Peabody series, but I picked this up at a book sale in the fall. This is my second book from the second half of the 20th century in the past few weeks and both reference Agatha Christie, literally and figuratively. In this case it was 10 Little Indians. As I said, fun.


message 4: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Great, G, don't forget to add the word "Review:" before your actual review. See message 1.


message 5: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments JANUARY

3. An Unsuitable Job for a Woman by P.D. James by P.D. James P.D. James

Finish date: January 19, 2013
Genre: Mystery
Rating: B+

Review: Keeping in mind I rate based on genre, and can't compare a Mystery to a History, this is a 4 star B+ in this genre. P.D. James creates images and scenes. This is my second read of this book (first was decades ago) and the language of the book is still the most important part. James' characters are flawed as they all are, but this book was too tidy. Unique for the time it was written, in terms of topics, but there is a heaviness to the person of Cordelia which I hadn't remembered. She seems so burdened by something and not just the suicide of her partner in the Detective Agency. Using the 'suicide' of the son of the person who hires her as a link for her to resolve her feelings about Bernie Pryde seemed a contrivance and James use of language becomes a character of itself. I am giving it 4 stars because it is better than her most recent book, Death Comes to Pemberly, but not 5 as I would do with many of the other Dalgliesh novels.

Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James by P.D. James P.D. James


message 6: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Bryan wrote: "Great, G, don't forget to add the word "Review:" before your actual review. See message 1."

Ok! Thanks.


message 7: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig perfect, G, thanks.


message 8: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new)

Vicki Cline | 3507 comments Mod
G wrote: " JANUARY

2. The Murders of Richard III by Elizabeth Peters by Elizabeth Peters Elizabeth Peters

Finish date: January 13, 2013
Genre: Cozy Mystery
Rating: B+

Review: Fun! An excell..."


G, have you read any of the Amelia Peabody series by this author? I just love them. An independent woman meets a forceful man, they fall in love and explore Egyptian archaeological digs. Very entertaining.


message 9: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Vicki, I listened to one and didn't like it. I can't even remember the book, but I was displeased with the reader, so I think I'll give the first book (eBook) a go. Since this one was so good, I can't help but think it was the audio which caused the problem for me. Thanks.


message 10: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig G, just add the month for the first entry in that month if you want. You don't need to put it in every entry. Happy reading :-)


message 11: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 4. Crocodile on the Sandbank (Amelia Peabody #1) by Elizabeth Peters by Elizabeth Peters Elizabeth Peters

Finish Date: January 25, 2013
Genre: Cozy Mystery
Rating: B+

Review:
I found this to be very enjoyable book; even though I knew what was going on almost as soon as each of the characters and their stories were introduced, I was entertained because of the unique voice of Amelia Peabody, the protagonist. I loved the setting and even the obvious story line.

I had heard one of Ms. Peters Peabody books several years ago and was not thrilled. Because of serendipity (a book sale) and Goodreads, I read a non Peabody book and was surprised at how easily the words flowed. I read this book at the encouragement of the “cozy mysteries group on Goodreads” and the recommendation of a fellow Goodreads reader. I am grateful. Overall, a very nice read, and I plan on reading the next one in the series.


message 12: by G (last edited Jan 25, 2013 08:17AM) (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 5 Thomas Jefferson The Art of Power by Jon Meacham by Jon Meacham Jon Meacham

Finish date: January 25, 2013
Genre: History, Biography
Rating: B+

Review:

I would like to thank the Goodreads History Book Club and Random House for this book, which I received as a free Goodreads giveaway.

I am almost as conflicted about this book as I am about the subject. As to Jefferson, I go from abhorring his inability to act on abolition, even when it is not necessary for any direct political purpose on his part, as with the Missouri Compromise, to choking up with pride during Jefferson’s toast to LaFayette.

Meacham shows Jefferson not as a reflection of his time, but because, to the best of his ability, Jefferson thought strategically, to the future. To our time. Some thing, some vision our current politicians are seemingly incapable of doing.

As to the book, I am at once annoyed by it, but also amazed by the authors abilities to draw parallels to todays politics. I am grateful it was not another salacious polemic in the Jefferson-Hemmings canon except where necessary to make a point. What bothered me the most was that the author would drop in tidbits of information, factoids, which have no link to any topic in the immediate vicinity of the statement. And at crucial times, the author would not advance his thesis of power and control when it seemed to have been a perfect opportunity to do so.

I was going to give it a 'B' because of the conflict between content and structure but then Mr. Meacham gave us the epilogue. Here are the points which could have been scattered throughout the book, but which he gathers together in this summation.

As Meacham said, “His (Jefferson's) genius lay in his versatility”; but as the author also points out during the book, this versatility came through control of and power over his world.

An annoying book, but ultimately a satisfying one.


message 13: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 6 A Stranger in Mayfair (Charles Lenox Mysteries, #4) by Charles Finch by Charles Finch Charles Finch

Finish date: January 28, 2013
Genre: Cozy Mystery
Rating: C

Review: Unfortunately, I was bored during most of this book. The earlier books in the Lenox series were better. The most interesting parts were his introduction to Parliament.


message 14: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments February

7. Traitor to His Class The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt by H.W. Brands by H.W. Brands H.W. Brands
Finish date: February 6, 2013.
Genre: Historical Biography
Rating: A-

Review: I had technical problems with this book: I started it on a first generation Kindle which died and eventually bought a hard copy, so it took much longer to read that it should have.

The author gives us, through primary sources, a treasure trove of information on the management style of the subject, and how it was used to great success both domestically and internationally. In addition to FDR's successes, Brands discusses Roosevelt’s failures, including Pearl Harbor, but primarily he proves the central thesis of the book, which was that Roosevelt believed in democracy. He believed in the people of the United States and as a result gave them courage and reassurance during the depression and during the war. He made people believe the government cared for them. As Brands said “They put their faith in Roosevelt because he put his faith in them.”

If you are at all interested in the era, the presidency, and FDR in particular, I highly recommend this book.


message 15: by G (last edited Feb 11, 2013 07:51AM) (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 8. Persuasion by Jane Austen by Jane Austen Jane Austen
Finish date: February 11, 2013
Genre: Fiction
Rating: A-

Review: Persuasion, in my opinion is a better-formed book than Pride and Prejudice. Perhaps because it was her last book, Austen’s sarcasm is more finely tuned than earlier books, and while Anne’s family is portrayed as caricatures, the other characters have personality and come alive on the page. And that letter is truly wonderful! It was nice to read it again.


message 16: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Thanks G, you can find a bookcover for this book.


message 17: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Bryan wrote: "Thanks G, you can find a bookcover for this book."

Bryan, there wasn't one for the Kindle edition, which is how I read it. Is it okay to put any old cover up there?


message 18: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Absolutely, G.


message 19: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments I changed it. Thanks, Bryan.


message 20: by Ann D (last edited Feb 12, 2013 06:20AM) (new)

Ann D G,
I loved PERSUASION. Have you seen the 1995 movie with Amanda Root and Ciarian Hinds? I thought it was great.

I enjoyed many of the Amanda Peabody mysteries when I was younger. The combination of mystery and a sense of humor was fun.

Persuasion by Jane Austen by Jane Austen Jane Austen


message 21: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Ann, I have not. I saw the BBC series, which I thought was terrific. Now I'll search for the movie you suggest. With regard to Peabody, I want to be her when I grow up :-)


message 22: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Bryan wrote: "Absolutely, G."
Bryan, another question - are audio books eligible for inclusion here? Thanks - G


message 23: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Yes, indeed, G, they are.


message 24: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 9. With Wings Like Eagles The Untold Story of the Battle of Britain by Michael Korda by Michael Korda

Finish Date: February 16, 2013
Genre: History, WWII
Rating: A-

Review: I wish I had read this before I went to Duxford, Hendon and IWM Lambeth. My father was a tool and die designer for aircraft instrumentation during WWII and my brother was an engineer who worked on the Lunar Excursion Module, so as a girl I thought it was normal to discuss things like radar, balancing the weight of a plane with the power of the engine, carburetor issues during rapid climbs, etc.

This book reminded me that even in the midst of a crisis, ego and politics could eat up creativity, foresight and strategic thinking. I was also introduced to the other side of Baldwin and Chamberlain “the appeasers” who bought Britain time. For those who are familiar with the terminology of aviation of the day, this is a wonderful book. It can be daunting if you are not. But the air fighter vision of Lord Dowding is the one thing you can safely come away with. And as always, I am not a fan of repetition, even when it serves a purpose as it does in this book, so it loses a quality point.

Two quick notes: there is an episode of the BBC show Foyles War (Eagle Day Episode) which covers the early problems with radar as discussed in this book, so kudos to the writers of the show for including it. And I was lucky enough to sit in the cockpit of P51 Mustang on a tarmac. You cannot begin to imagine the courage of those WWII pilots, regardless of country, until you realize both how big and how small those planes were.


message 25: by Ann D (new)

Ann D You have a very interesting family background in aeronautics, G.

I have heard that the death rate of the pilots in the Battle of Britain was horrendous.


message 26: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) G....I loved that book and gave it five stars. The Battle of Britain is one of the most written about episodes of the war, when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany and the Luftwaffe. And in the end, quality trumped quantity.
Here is another book that might interest you about the American flyers who, under threat of losing their US citizenship, joined the RAF and fought in the Battle of Britain before the US joined the war. Quite fascinating.

The Few The American "Knights of the Air" Who Risked Everything to Fight in the Battle of Britain by Alex Kershaw byAlex Kershaw


message 27: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Jill wrote: "G....I loved that book and gave it five stars. The Battle of Britain is one of the most written about episodes of the war, when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany and the Luftwaffe. And in th..."

Jill,

I was looking for something on the B of Britain and came across your review which encouraged me to read it (thanks!). I've added The Few to my TBR list. I am still having difficulty adjusting to reading books in which I write notes (on post-it's) with my Kindle, so it might be a while before I get to it.

The Few The American "Knights of the Air" Who Risked Everything to Fight in the Battle of Britain by Alex Kershaw by Alex Kershaw


message 28: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Ann wrote: "You have a very interesting family background in aeronautics, G.

I have heard that the death rate of the pilots in the Battle of Britain was horrendous."


Ann, I didn't realize how special it was until they were both gone. I am very lucky to come from a family of readers!


message 29: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 10. The Curse of the Pharaohs (Amelia Peabody, #2) by Elizabeth Peters by Elizabeth Peters Elizabeth Peters

Finish Date: February 17, 2013
Genre: cozy, cozy-like mysteries
Rating: B+

Review: I really like Amelia and Emerson. They are a wonderful duo and Ms . Peters captures the banter of an affectionate couple quite well. Obvious ending, as with most cozy's, but the summary of how her deductions were made was delicious. Some unfortunate modern day cultural implications, but the author cannot be blamed for what she didn't know in the 1970's. Overall it was entertaining, even though it dragged in spots. Looking forward to seeing what she does with Ramses.


message 30: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 11. The Last Detective (Peter Diamond, #1) by Peter Lovesey by Peter Lovesey Peter Lovesey

Finish date: February 18, 2013
Genre: Mystery
Rating: B+

The narrator was fabulous. Very easily drew me in. An almost quirky, not quite old fashioned story, but maybe. The narrative was complex but the story line moved right along. I wasn't sure "exactly" how it would play out until the end. Always a good sign in a mystery. A couple of characters were dropped in here and there just for the heck of it and the ultimate ending bordered on pedestrian, but I enjoyed listening to it and on occasion had to stop cleaning (ok, not really a stretch) to pay closer attention. Recommended for those who like almost traditional mysteries which take place a few decades ago and have plot points specific to the time.


message 31: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) I love the Diamond stories, G. I think I have read them all and they are pretty consistent in quality.


message 32: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 42665 comments Mod
G you are off to a stupendous start.


message 33: by Ann D (new)

Ann D G,
Just about anything motivates me to stop cleaning. :)


message 34: by G (last edited Feb 26, 2013 06:06AM) (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 12. The Hare With Amber Eyes A Family's Century of Art and Loss by Edmund de Waal by Edmund de Waal Edmund de Waal

Finish Date: February 23, 2013.
Genre: Non-Fiction
Rating: B

What do stars mean? What do letter grades mean? It is all so personal. At the beginning of this book, I gave it an A because it thrilled me to be given a little mental video of this time in Paris, the circle of artists in the French Third Republic, and their patrons. The time of the Impressionists and the writers, like Proust, who inhabited this special ether. It made me remember how much I love art. This book was recommended to me because of my love of visual art, but I had no idea as to the content, and had to look up Netsuke. To the next section, I give a C because I don’t want to know these terrible things happened. The next section I give a B because I know what happened is true but it hurts so much it made me cry. And at the end, I give the entire book a B because it is the author’s journey, not mine. It is a journey along the cobbled road of his ancestor’s path. They were people who were extravagantly wealthy art patrons until they failed financially and ultimately became the detritus of European anti-Semitism. The core of the book is the Netsuke, which were bought, moved, hidden, resurfaced and brought to their place of origin in Japan and then came to rest (for now) in the authors home. The book is the author’s scavenger hunt, a long torturous journey through his past, in which I am a voyeur. It is a tour de force, but not to my liking. What I got from this book, is the sadness, the sense of loss and yet the endurance, the thread, the continuity of true organic art.


message 35: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Bentley wrote: "G you are off to a stupendous start."

Thanks! I really do enjoy reading, in case it's not obvious (smile)


message 36: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Ann wrote: "G,
Just about anything motivates me to stop cleaning. :)"


Now if someone could write the history of cleaning.....


message 37: by Tomerobber (new)

Tomerobber | 334 comments G wrote: "11. The Hare With Amber Eyes A Family's Century of Art and Loss by Edmund de Waal by Edmund de Waal Edmund de Waal

Finish Date: February 23, 2013.
Genre: Non-Fiction
Rating: B

Wh..."

I have this on hold at my local library . . . I love Netsuke . . . I have one I purchased years ago . . . Glad to know this was a good read . . .


message 38: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments I misnumbered!! Can't count to save myself.


message 39: by G (last edited Feb 26, 2013 06:18AM) (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 13. The Sound of Broken Glass (Duncan Kincaid & Gemma James, #15) by Deborah Crombie by Deborah Crombie Deborah Crombie

Finish Date: February 25, 2013
Genre: Mystery
Rating: A-

Review:
I am fond of the James and Kincaid series. It is well written and character development is detailed and well done. Ms. Crombie's last in the series so far was not my favorite, so I read this with some trepidation. The plot line and characters unfolded like a slow motion card game. Each card was turned to reveal a new bit of information. At one point my stomach was 'in knots' waiting to see how things played out. And I stayed up to finish the book. This genre is not to everyones taste, and I was disappointed with the era specific references (who will know what the Marauders Map is in 20 years?), and the relationship ending which was too neat. The murders were wrapped up, but she still managed a cliff hanger of sorts at the end. You have to know the series to understand the importance of the ending. A very satisfying read for me.


message 40: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments March

14. Darwin's Ghosts The Secret History of Evolution by Rebecca Stott by Rebecca Stott Rebecca Stott

Finish Date: March 4, 2013
Genre: Non-Fiction
Rating: C

Review:
I can’t say I thought this was a worthwhile read. I was 1/3 through before I learned something I didn’t already know. I didn’t really get the point of the book. Was it that people were involved in empirical thought before Darwin? Knew that already. Was it to tell us people thought of the evolution concept before Darwin? Knew that already. That Darwin expanded the ideas of others? We knew that. Was it an attempt to put together Darwins intellectual forebears? If so, it was not well realized. In fact, she was struggling to make her point throughout the book. It was forced and did not flow easily. I did get the importance of learned discussions on controversial topics. I did get that we are obliged to remember that there are still people in this world who do not have the freedom to read whatever they want and that there are places where women are not even allowed to learn to read. I was reminded of how oppressive governments and religions can be to free thought. And finally, I realized I should have paid more attention to Diderot in Humanities 101.


message 41: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 42665 comments Mod
Good start G.


message 42: by G (last edited Mar 08, 2013 03:10PM) (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 15. The Wee Free Men (Discworld, #30) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett

Finish date: March 7, 2013
Genre: YA
Rating: B

Review:
This is the story of a girl, with an annoying younger brother, and her fight against her fears and nightmares and her journey through an alternate reality.

As an adult, I see all the pick-ups from earlier YA novels – Alice in Wonderland, Wizard of Oz, the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, and surprisingly, Harry Potter. Sometimes, it's really annoying. But the child in me sees only the fear and the opportunities for self-reliance and safety. It is derivative, but occasionally creative. Maybe this style is the current preference and I am just behind the times, but Rowling was more subtle, more skilled when she referenced prior works (Fluffy as Cerberus for example), as opposed to the direct lifting of the ‘eat me’ statement from Alice which Pratchett does. And dream worlds, well both Alice and Dorothy do a better job. As for erstwhile assistants, perhaps Pratchett is better in this area because I think Dorothy’s assistants were more transparent, more overtly symbolic in their roles. The Nac Mac Feegle are less black and white and have more complexity.

Ultimately it works as a YA book because you have to fight through your dreams and face reality, 'nae' matter what your age.


Alice in Wonderland (Alice, #1) by Lewis Carroll by Lewis Carroll Lewis Carroll
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum by L. Frank Baum L. Frank Baum
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1) by C.S. Lewis by C.S. Lewis C.S. Lewis
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Harry Potter, #2) by J.K. Rowling by J.K. Rowling J.K. Rowling


message 43: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig G, please add author links to message 42.


message 44: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Bryan wrote: "G, please add author links to message 42."

Sorry! Fixed.


message 45: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 16. A Man Lay Dead (Roderick Alleyn #1) by Ngaio Marsh by Ngaio Marsh Ngaio Marsh

Finish Date: March 9, 2013
Genre: Mystery
Rating: B+

Review:

Chief Inspector Alleyn is an insouciant kind of guy and because of this the reader occasionally has trouble taking things seriously. But as with all Marsh books, it is well plotted, well charactered and nicely resolved. Good quick read.


message 46: by G (last edited Mar 14, 2013 12:16PM) (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments 17. Woodrow Wilson (The American Presidents, #28) by H.W. Brands by H.W. Brands H.W. Brands

Finish Date: March 14, 2013
Genre: Biography
Rating: B+

Review:

I read this little book in the American Presidents series to see if I wanted to read more about Wilson in the upcoming group read. Reading a book written by Prof. H.W. Brands certainly gives the reader an insight into the subject, but I came away a little repulsed by Wilson who seems to have been a fundamentalist ideologue. This was a good book for what it is. A short summary and overview. You have to approach it that way or you will be disappointed.

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. wrote the afterward and he says: biography offers an easy education in American history, rendering the past more human, more vivid, more intimate, more accessible, more connected to ourselves.

I think that is so true. He also said “Biographies of American presidents constitute a chronicle of wisdom and folly, nobility and pettiness, courage and cunning, forthrightness and deceit, quarrel and consensus. The turmoil perennially swirling around the White House illuminates the heart of the American democracy.”

Based on this book, and the afterward, I’ll have to read the Wilson bio designated as the group read, but I’ll be coming to it with a bias, unfortunately.


message 47: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Thanks, G. If you have not read Cooper's prologue, yet, this should help you out. He seems to paint a different picture than Brands does.

Woodrow Wilson A Biography by John Milton Cooper Jr. John Milton Cooper Jr.

H.W. Brands H.W. Brands


message 48: by G (new)

G Hodges (glh1) | 901 comments Bryan wrote: "Thanks, G. If you have not read Cooper's prologue, yet, this should help you out. He seems to paint a different picture than Brands does.

Woodrow Wilson A Biography by John Milton Cooper Jr.John Milt..."


It wasn't really Brands, who actually showed how much Wilson was adored in Europe, but my reaction to some of Wilson's self-righteous, my way or the highway, comments. When I get the Cooper book, I'll check out the prologue immediately. Thanks


message 49: by Tomerobber (new)

Tomerobber | 334 comments Bryan wrote: "Thanks, G. If you have not read Cooper's prologue, yet, this should help you out. He seems to paint a different picture than Brands does.

Woodrow Wilson A Biography by John Milton Cooper Jr.John Milt..."


There is supposed to be a new bio of Wilson by A. Scott Berg coming out in Sept. 2013.

I couldn't get the database search to find the cover . . but here's the link to his author page
A. Scott Berg


message 50: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Here you go, Tomerobber:

Wilson by A. Scott Berg A. Scott Berg


« previous 1 3
back to top