Fans of Arthur C. Clarke discussion

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Say hello to Clarke.

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message 1: by Qin (new)

Qin Xie (xieqin) | 9 comments I'll spare half to one hour to read it.
I found that 8 predictions of Clarke have come true.


message 2: by Jaice (new)

Jaice Cooperrider (plasborgma) | 74 comments Mod
What predictions? Are they predictions from Childhood's End? Let me know when you are finished with it.


message 3: by Qin (new)

Qin Xie (xieqin) | 9 comments No.from all of his books.I'll look in depth and try to translate that tomorrow.


message 4: by Qin (new)

Qin Xie (xieqin) | 9 comments 8 predictions(I found that it's more due to readers' desire to make his predictions come true)
1.elevator:2010
2.Y2K virus(didn't come true)
3.Spaceguard Survey(Meet with Maya.The book name may be wrong.carried out by NASA in 1992)
4.Communication Satellite (carried out by Symcom-3 in 1964)
5.Nuclear-powered satellite(tried by US and Russia in Project Orion and Universe 954)
6.Spot Weld of the earth's plates to avoid earthquakes(failed in terrorism)
7.Copy of human's brain.(in book 3001:last Odyssey.The project "MyLifeBits" is concerned with recording one's way of recording one's life in digital form)
8.cryonics(in the book The songs of distant earth.now used to store dead body,organs,eggs and germs.)
8.


message 5: by Jaice (new)

Jaice Cooperrider (plasborgma) | 74 comments Mod
I have never heard of some of them.


message 6: by Brady (new)

Brady (turambar047) | 2 comments I've read about half these in Clarke's books, and I've heard of most of them in real life. I know for a fact that the popularity of the Space Elevator idea originated with Clarke, and there are annual competitions working to further this concept. Same thing with the copy of the brain. I'm not sure as sure about cryonics, or cryogenics, but I can guarantee you that he brought it to the forefront of the sci-fi and scientific community.

Clarke was a true trailblazer.


message 7: by Qin (new)

Qin Xie (xieqin) | 9 comments cryonics,I read this in real-life before.It can make some women on the go to have baby later.I thought it's very interesting.


message 8: by Brady (new)

Brady (turambar047) | 2 comments The possibilities are endless. The classic sci-fi scenario, which is being worked on in real life, is freezing the bodies of dead or near-death humans with the intent to resurrect them in the future using advanced technology. The novel A World Out of Time by Larry Niven is a fantastic novel building on this idea.


message 9: by Qin (new)

Qin Xie (xieqin) | 9 comments Oh...Mr Mao's body is waiting in Beijing...They can also use that to let women pregnant later.


message 10: by Jaice (new)

Jaice Cooperrider (plasborgma) | 74 comments Mod
The one I haven't heard about is the Spaceguard Survey, so I will have to look into it. Clarke did not invent the idea for the space elevator (some Russian guy did), but he did popularize it in his book "The Fountains of Paradise" (an excellent novel). I suspect we will have a space elevator by 2050, but there are some major engineering issues to work out right now. Cryonics in a primitive sense is definitely happening now, as there is a company in Phoenix, Arizona, called Alcor, that puts bodies (or just their heads) in cryonic preservation, but it is only done (immediately) after death, not before, in order to avoid legal issues. There is, of course, also the freezing of human zygotes (sperm and eggs) for future reproductive purposes, as Qin put forth so elegantly. ;-) And copying the human brain is one of my overall research goals that I am working on in grad school right now. I call it "mental cloning." There have been some major developments in suspended animation over the past several years, which I can discuss further if anyone is interested.


message 11: by Qin (new)

Qin Xie (xieqin) | 9 comments An scientist have to say he haven't heard some when he haven't heard of one. /(ㄒoㄒ)/~~


message 12: by Jaice (new)

Jaice Cooperrider (plasborgma) | 74 comments Mod
There are others in the list that I haven't heard Clarke predict himself, not that I have not heard of them in reality. Your sarcasm was not lost on me, Qin. :-)


message 13: by Jaice (new)

Jaice Cooperrider (plasborgma) | 74 comments Mod
I have also never heard of spot welding tectonic plates to prevent earthquakes, so there! :-P


message 14: by Qin (new)

Qin Xie (xieqin) | 9 comments You are modest.:)The spot welding tectonic plates to prevent earthquakes is in the book,wrote with Mike McQuay.Don't let me translate that book name...


message 15: by Jaice (new)

Jaice Cooperrider (plasborgma) | 74 comments Mod
That makes sense. I have that book, but haven't read it yet. The Richter scale measures the intensity of earthquakes (China does not use it), so Richter 10 is an unbelievably bad earthquake, worse than any modern (if any) humans have experienced.


message 16: by Qin (new)

Qin Xie (xieqin) | 9 comments Jason wrote: "That makes sense. I have that book, but haven't read it yet. The Richter scale measures the intensity of earthquakes (China does not use it), so Richter 10 is an unbelievably bad earthquake, worse ..."

Oh.Thank you!So they use spot welding..glue is more fimiliar to me .^-^



message 17: by Larry (new)

Larry (hal9000i) | 71 comments Qin wrote: "6.Spot Weld of the earth's plates to avoid earthquakes(failed in terrorism)"

Ah, Richter 10, which I recently read. not a bad read but its hardly Clarke-he just wrote out an 850 word film plan. I think most of the words and ideas in that book are McQuay's


message 18: by Jaice (new)

Jaice Cooperrider (plasborgma) | 74 comments Mod
Larry wrote: "Ah, Richter 10, which I recently read. not a bad read but its hardly Clarke-he just wrote out an 850 word film plan. I think most of the words and ideas in that book are McQuay's"

Good to know, Larry. It was already low on my to-read list, but it is now even lower.


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