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Non-SFR group Authors/Works > The Cask of Amontillado by Poe

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

I was just doing the neverending quiz when a great question about this story came up and I had to get down my book in order to double check the correct answer but then I clicked the wrong one anyway! Sigh! Ever done that?

I read this great classic IMO to my son when he was about ten and he has never forgotten it. I was thinking about it this morning as I am readin Following the Sun and he writes about carnivale some things I never knew. Apparently it is a very ancient holiday. The Cask of Amontillado


message 2: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1848 comments Carnival/carnivale, in Catholic communities, is the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday: a last fling of celebration and merriment before the penitential time of fasting and spiritual reflection. The name comes from the Latin phrase, "Carne, vale!" ("Flesh, farewell!").

Poe is one of my favorite writers, and this classic story is one of his best, IMO. Contrary to what many people believe, though, he wrote very little in the supernatural genre (and some of that is tongue-in-cheek). His favorite emotional effect is indeed horror; but he preferred to evoke it, as he does here, by natural means: things like murder, madness, premature living burial, mortal danger, the tortures of the Inquisition, and the science-fictional mysteries of the unknown. Even "Ligeia" isn't truly a ghost story, but a tale of psychic survival achieved by a pure triumph of mental force over matter.


message 3: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) That's so frustrating, Alice! Of course I'd never admit to having done it - at least more than a dozen times...

That's a wonderful story. One of my kids complained when reading it that the whole 'walling up' thing had been done so often. I had to laugh. He went on to read some Shakespeare & other works of Poe. He delighted in pointing out where newer stories had copied those plots & devices.


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Rob wrote: "I probably read the story for the first time when I was about ten. I liked it, as I did most Poe, but I never quite understood the story completely...not knowing what a cask was NOR amontillado! ..."

LOL! Thanks for sharing this with me. I think my son liked it for the same reason. I feel sure he did have an idea that Amontillado is a type of alcohol but not positive about it.




message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

Werner wrote: "Carnival/carnivale, in Catholic communities, is the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday: a last fling of celebration and merriment before the penitential time of fasting and spiritual reflection. The nam..."

Thanks! I never realized this. Its only recently that I picked up that carne is a root word for meat. I have never liked the word carnival and really no idea why.
Any type of reference to carnivals gives me the "willies" like in Something Wicked This Way Comes which I thought started out great as soon as it got really involved in the circus or carnival that came to town I could no longer read it! Same for the 5 People You Meet in Heaven which I loathed and there is another one I had to quit reading when it started on about carnivals.

Now I like Harlequin just fine which I think might somehow be associated with carnival? (not sure)

Well, that is sure interesting about Ligeia as I thought she was like a ghost. Poe is my favorite writer of horror and then I guess Stephen King is second.




message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

Jim wrote: "That's so frustrating, Alice! Of course I'd never admit to having done it - at least more than a dozen times...

That's a wonderful story. One of my kids complained when reading it that the whole..."


Well, every so often when I stay up too late on the neverending quiz I do stuff like that and then I know I had better quit and go to bed.

Very sharp of your son to pick up on that. I believe even Stephen King said he was influenced by Poe.




message 7: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) Alice, my son thought Poe was copying walling up someone from another author, not realizing that it is from Poe's story that so many others have sprung. My son had it backwards, which is why I laughed. He had read it too early, didn't know anything about the author.

He knew about Shakespeare & was surprised at how many stories were built on his plots. His mistake with Poe gave him an edge up on the rest of the class in realizing that early & looking for it.


message 8: by Kate (new)

Kate (katespofford) | 5 comments I definitely liked this story and did a paper on it for a college English class... I was not aware of the meaning behind Carnivale, but I did know that Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday) is also the day before Ash Wednesday and I think the two are synonymous.


message 9: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1848 comments Yes, Katie, they are!


message 10: by Laura (new)

Laura (questionableadvice) | 20 comments Even reading the title of The Cask of Amontillado gives me the creeps. We had to read it in grade school - sixth grade, I think - and it freaked me out so badly I slept with the lights on for quite a while. It scared me so badly that even as an adult I've never gone back to re-read it.


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

LOL! Laura I am like you! I was ok with the Cask altho I have claustrophobia and the idea of catacombs is too spooky for me. Anne Rice got me even more on this and I had to quit her. I would never go into catacombs, there is simply nothing that would induce me to.

When I was about 16 I tried to read Dracula and ended up attempting to sleep with a sheet wrapped around my neck as I was no nervous, LOL! I like scary stuff and some of it I can handle and some I simply cannot. Poe can scare a person silly. I have trouble with the Pit and the Pendulum.


ღ Carol jinx~☆~☔ʚϊɞ | 10 comments I love Poe. I am claustrophobic also and it would have taken more than one person to drag me in the
catacombs. What a nightmare to be buried alive like that. The idea has been presented in different movies such as one called Buried Alive and I think an episode of Alfred Hitchcock presents. They always scare me but I can't stop now.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Oh, we are the same on this. The scariest one for me was an Anne Rice one where one of the vampires was put into a vault, that was it for me...no more Anne Rice. Can you imagine ..they cannot die so he was walled up for all eternity unless one of his friends managed to find him and get him out.

I like Poe best of all and probably Stephen King after that. Werner also wrote a very good vampire book. Lifeblood


ღ Carol jinx~☆~☔ʚϊɞ | 10 comments Oh, I should check that out. I like Poe the best too. I also love Stephen King. One of my favorites of his isn't even horror, Dolores Claiborne. I love that book and the movie. What well-deserved justice was accomplished there. I don't know if you've read it or seen it but pretty sure you have.
I just bought a new Poe book and I think it has The Pit and the Pendulum and the Raven and others. It has great illustrations. I liked how Edward Gorey illustrated.


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

I did see that and liked it but barely remember it. Didn't it involve someone falling into a pit?

I just took the Audobon test that came into my email. Its about birds moving further north. It had a little blurb about canaries!
I try to participate in their raptor count and general bird count some years.
A few days ago I saw a red-tailed hawk after a magpie, that was weird. We almost never see red-tailed hawks up here but to see it chasing a magpie sure surprised me. Years ago I bought myself The Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe which I believe has everything in it. I also joined the Poe group here at goodreads. Its super slow tho. The Poe stamp is out there at the post office so be sure to get yourself a few.

In high school we had to memorize 100 lines of poetry so I chose The Raven which has more than 100 lines. Its probably my very favorite poem but I like Frost too. I also have a similar collection of his stories and poems. My book has no illustrations. I can't place Edward Gorey. It seems that Neil Gaimans book M is for Magic had some good illustrations. I also like the cover of Werner's book Lifeblood. The vampire is perfect. You can't make it out here at goodreads but if you see an actual copy its just gorgeous. (better than Edward Cullen but don't let any of the little teenagers on here know I said that!!) LOL!


ღ Carol jinx~☆~☔ʚϊɞ | 10 comments I don't know what IMO means!Duh! Inform me!
EdwardGorey drew line drawings that are very detailed. I fyou every watched "Mystery" the opening part where a woman would walk through foggy streets of London and go to the cemetery. She threw herself over a tombstone and wailed. It's just a lot of pencil lines. My son did it in his art class and received an award for it in the High School Artists Show.
I'm sure you've seen or heard of his books Amphigoreys etc. His books are dark but funny. I had a calendar of his when I was working and it had one page that read ----- died of ennui! Some of the people I worked with said they didn't like my taste in calendars because most of the pages were about death. I just said they didn't have to look at my calendar.


message 17: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1848 comments Thanks for your kind words, Alice! Of course,my vampire character, Ana, is female; so while I agree that Lisa Victoria did a good job on my book cover, I can understand if Edward's female teen fans think he's the more gorgeous of the two --they have a somewhat different perspective. :-)

The edition that has that cover is unfortunately out of print, because the publisher folded last year. I'm actively looking for a traditional publisher to do a reprint; but in the meantime, I've decided to self-publish a reprint through lulu.com, just to have copies available for readers who want to buy one. When it's actually available, I'll post a short notice to this group.


message 18: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) Carol, IMO means 'In My Opinion'. IMHO, adds 'Humble'.

Go to Google & you can find all kinds of good sites on this kind of short hand. I have to - often. SWMBO had me going for a while. Turns out it means 'wife' as in 'She Who Must Be Obeyed'. I told that to mine & she glared at me. No sense of humor.


ღ Carol jinx~☆~☔ʚϊɞ | 10 comments Good! Good! I like those. I love SWMBO I'll have to change it for my husband. He thinks I have too much of a sense of humor. He's the one who paraphrases Oscar Wilde saying You don't have to be a bigamist to have one wife too many!
Have you heard of OSHAT?
Otherwise Supportive Husbands Against Twilight
TSTL Too Stupid To Live


message 20: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 19, 2009 09:10PM) (new)

Oh, I have seen that on PBS! We watch PBS quite often. I like dark!! So I would probably like your calendar. My son got me started with Despair. Its so funny. I will try to send you the one I got today as its a hoot. I even made up a Despair calender and sent it to my Mom when they were on sale.

Thanks Jim for helping on the IMO. I learned that short hand when I was on the Air Force Academy Family Net where most everyone used to use IMO and IMHO as we all had "humble" opinions, LOL! I really set them off once concerning anthrax! I thought there would be an online riot! I wanted to buy the She Who must be Obeyed night gown and coffee cup today on The Pyramid collection but they were too pricy even on sale.
LOL! I also like the one you found Carol.....Otherwise Supportive Husbands Against Twilight! That is so funny. Hubby was super about letting me spend too much on Twilight which sure surprised me. He even drove me to Borders....guess I was driving him crazy talking about when I could get the next book!

TSTL sounds like Heinlein, he has some quote to that effect. (his character Lazurus Long)





message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

Werner wrote: "Thanks for your kind words, Alice! Of course,my vampire character, Ana, is female; so while I agree that Lisa Victoria did a good job on my book cover, I can understand if Edward's female teen fans..."

~~~~~~~~~~

LOL! very true! When I was first reading Twilight I got on some Twilight groups and finally couldn't take it anymore with all the "OH< Edward is sooooooo HOT!"..had to get off, then my sister joined Twilight haters so I got on just to see what it was about and posted "Madame< methinks thou doth protest too much!" as they were all screaming and ranting!!! Why? Then my sister who lambasted me for reading it went to see the movie TWICE! People are sure crazy.

I have to be sure to hang onto this link in case I decide to give it for a gift. I should be able to remember lulu since my aunt is Tommie Lou, right?
~~~~~~~~

The edition that has that cover is unfortunately out of print, because the publisher folded last year. I'm actively looking for a traditional publisher to do a reprint; but in the meantime, I've decided to self-publish a reprint through lulu.com, just to have copies available for readers who want to buy one. When it's actually available, I'll post a short notice to this group.







message 22: by Henrik (new)

Henrik | 43 comments Jim wrote: "... No sense of humor."

ROFLOL! I'll share that one with my wife!:-) I have a suspicion she will react much in tune with your wife, Jim:-P


ღ Carol jinx~☆~☔ʚϊɞ | 10 comments Canary Alice wrote: "Oh, I have seen that on PBS! We watch PBS quite often. I like dark!! So I would probably like your calendar. My son got me started with Despair. Its so funny. I will try to send you the one I..."

Carol wrote: "Good! Good! I like those. I love SWMBO I'll have to change it for my husband. He thinks I have too much of a sense of humor. He's the one who paraphrases Oscar Wilde saying You don't have to be a ..."




ღ Carol jinx~☆~☔ʚϊɞ | 10 comments I knw you had to have seen it. I love PBS. I love mysteries and Sherlock Holmes. I just realized one day that the one who played Sherlock Holmes was Freddy in My Fair Lady. I love English movies. I'm trying to think of the one I saw with Natasha Richardson in it. I think it was something about a widow. I'll look on the IMDB. It's sad that she died skiing.


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

I have never managed to read a whole Sherlock Holmes altho I have tried The Hound of the Baskervilles, that is Sherlock isn't it? The Mysterious Case of the Dog in the Night Time is about an autistic kid who liked Sherlock Holmes and figures out his own mystery. Its super good so keep it in mind.


ღ Carol jinx~☆~☔ʚϊɞ | 10 comments Yes, I read that. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time. It was really good and helped me understand how an autistic mind works.


message 27: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1848 comments Yes, Alice, The Hound of the Baskervilles is part of the Holmes canon. Like most of Poe's stories, Doyle's Holmes corpus eschews the supernatural; but this is the most Gothic of the Holmes novels, with its legend of a supernatural, lethal family curse, and its setting: spooky Baskerville Hall on the lonely, fog- shrouded, quicksand-pocked moor. The Holmes novels and stories have their fair share of such settings, and an assortment of macabre and scary elements: words scrawled in blood, poison darts, murder by poisonous snake, insanity-inducing African herbs, etc. "The Sussex Vampire" is probably the closest approach to the supernatural in the stories featuring Holmes, but Doyle also wrote some genuinely supernatural short fiction --his animated Egyptian mummy tale, "Lot No. 249," for instance.

We've all managed to wander quite a ways off topic; and I've been as bad as anybody! But then, strictly speaking, the Poe story isn't supernatural fiction anyway. :-) If folks want to use this thread for general chit-chat and getting to know each other, I say go for it --some other groups have similar threads, and it's not a bad idea.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Oh, another lethal family curse? How cool! Is it a genetic one? I bought this book a few months back and have to get to it. Today I also got very cheap a nearly new copy of Edgar or Edward Sawtelle's book and another book very popular right now. My favorite one for an ancient family curse that kills out the family seems to be The Fall of the House of Usher. The believe the brother and sister were the very last two of that family, right?
I need to take a cheap paperback on our trip so I can keep reading. I hate to take an expensive hardback or library book as I fear losing it.

So many books I haven't read.....or
"So many books, so litte time."


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

I have started The Hound of the Baskervilles a couple of times but always quit reading it perhaps because I sometimes have nightmares about black dogs. I was once chased by a Newfoundland in Newfoundland! I will keep trying to read it tho. Maybe its the one I should take on our trip since its a very small paperback.

Should these two be separate threads?


message 30: by Larry (new)

Larry (electricfire7319) | 2 comments I'm a freshman, and for our poetry part of English,we read ad discussed a couple of Poe's Poems. I felt like I was in a remidial remidial class(I' m NOT). My teacher read The Cask of Amontillado and dressed up and everything, but we kept stopping to answer questions about it. It's not a hard poem!!!!! She also slaughetered the poem, she put on her stupid english accent(it sucks really really bad)and read it like that. I felt that the poem deserved more than that, I mean seriously it was done by Edgar Allen Poe, it was like she was mocking him!!!(she also did it for the Tell Tale Heart, that was worse!!!)


message 31: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1848 comments Larry, I'm confused --did your English teacher think "The Cask of Amontillado" is a poem? (If she did, she's probably the only person on earth who does. :-)) Poe wrote quite a few poems, such as "The Raven;" but this is not one of them! And I'm not sure why she thought anything by Poe should be read with a British accent --granted, as a kid he went to boarding school in England for awhile, but he was an American who lived most of his life in America, and neither of the stories you mentioned is set in England. (Actually, very few if any of his works are set there.)


message 32: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) Larry, I'll second everything Werner said. If I was paying for your college education, I'd want to know & would be all over the teacher for garbage like that.
-----
Lots of good actors have read, "The Raven" over the years. Read by Christopher Walken is one of my favorites. There's a YouTube of it here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFy7Xi...

Vincent Price does it well, too. A YouTube is here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FID1Ci...

If you look at the related videos, you'll also find "Vincent" a short by Tim Burton with Vincent Price doing the voice. It's great, too.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASHP-v...

John Astin (Gomez in the original Adams Family) reads "The Raven" pretty well, but not a favorite.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACUxJ6...

There's a funny clip from the movie, "The Raven". That had Karloff, Price, Nicholson & Lorre in it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HN-ML...

James Earl Jones also has a reading of it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXU3Rf...



message 33: by John (last edited Apr 15, 2009 06:38AM) (new)

John Karr (karr) | 64 comments Ha, that teacher ridicules Poe to her own detriment. It is an invitation for bad vibes. So easy to criticize someone else's creation ... where's hers?

Good links, Jim. The John Astin one reminded me of when my brother and I went to see his one-man play about Poe at Duke Chapel here in North Kackalaki. He did a great job, particularly in remembering so much material, including the entire Raven poem.

Of course, in his black suit and moustache, he appeared quite a bit like Poe as well.






message 34: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) I hadn't known Astin did a one man play, John. I probably should as he lives in Baltimore. He was a fabulous as Gomez in the "Addam's Family" & I loved him as the Riddler in the 60's "Batman" series with Adam West. He's such a goof, lots of fun & wildly expressive, especially his voice. He was Harry's father on "Night Court" too.


message 35: by Simon (last edited Apr 16, 2009 04:25AM) (new)

Simon (shipscook) | 11 comments changing thge subject slightly Peter Hammill of Van Der Graaf Generator wrote an opera based upon The Fall of the House of Usher, featuring himself as Roderick, Andy Bell of Erasure as Montresor, Lene Lovich as Madeline and Sarah Jane Morris as the Chorus.


Sadly I believe it is out of print so finding a copy is hard, but worth it alone for Hammill's performance of The Haunted Palace

See Hammill's sofasound website for more info

http://www.sofasound.com/nlnov99.htm


message 36: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1848 comments Montresor, of course, is a character in "The Cask of Amontillado," but not "The Fall of the House of Usher." So Hammill's opera evidently blends elements from both stories. Thanks for the tip, and the link, Simon!


message 37: by Simon (new)

Simon (shipscook) | 11 comments yes of course he is, Chris smith who wrote the libretto needed a name for the narrator and chose to use Montresor rather than create something new

there are incidentally two versions the original released on some Bizarre and a more guitar heavy veresion relaesed some years later on hammill's own label, I have the earlier one.


message 38: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) Please do! They're public.


message 39: by [deleted user] (new)

Yes, it finally dawned on me! sigh..sinus infection here so brain is slower than usual. Thanks,
alice


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