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Likeable Business: Why Today's Consumers Demand More and How Leaders Can Deliver
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Book Discussions > Likeable Business - January 2013

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Jacob (paulsen) | 245 comments This is the official discussion of our January 2013 book, "Likeable Business."


message 2: by Ken (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ken | 17 comments Looking forward to getting my hands on this book. I may be comparing it to "Raving Fans" by Blanchard and Bowles if the same content is covered.


message 3: by Layton (new)

Layton | 1 comments Recently downloaded and now listening to the excellent "The Charisma Myth." Highly recommended and super practical, especially if you're in customer-facing situations.


message 4: by Ken (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ken | 17 comments 12books posted a link to a great summary article by Dave Kerpen on "Why it Pays to be Likeable." Have your YouTube search ready, because there are a couple of clips mentioned that majorly impacted the reputation of the companies they were antagonizing.

http://changethis.com/manifesto/show/...


Casey Wheeler (caseywheeler) I am interested hearing from any of those who are reading the book have used social media to either complain about a business/service or compliment a business/service and what the end result was.


Jary Welker (jarywelker) | 17 comments I frequent a self service car wash in my neighborhood. You drive up, choose your wash package, pay an attendant, and stay in the car through the cycle and then go to the vacuum section. It has been open a couple of years to great fanfare, popularity long lines but service has slipped on several of my recent trips. I had "liked' their business Facebook page and commented there just this week, after reading 'likeable business' and not only got a quick response but exchanged some other comments and was told I could pick up a gift card at the office for being such a loyal customer. Clean Freak's quick response to my concerns have kept me as a customer for now. It worked here this time.


Jacob (paulsen) | 245 comments I've rarely had an experience like Jary's. It is not uncommon for me to leave both positive and negative reviews via Google Plus, Yelp, and Facebook. I would describe the most common responses as defensive. A recent purchase at a local bakery led my wife and I to send an email to the company letting them know we felt the quality was below par. It has warranted no response thus far. On the flip side, a complaint about shipping damage on a toy ordered from Disney's website drove them to send us a new one suggesting we donate the original to a local charity :)


message 8: by Jay (last edited Jan 25, 2013 06:43AM) (new)

Jay Oza | 137 comments Casey wrote: "I am interested hearing from any of those who are reading the book have used social media to either complain about a business/service or compliment a business/service and what the end result was."

I gave a bad review of a book called "The Challenger Sale" mainly because the figures in Kindle version were unreadable. The author saw it, apologized and sent me a hard copy free of charge.

I complained about IBM's policy of not reimbursing for local travel expense incurred during interviews and they didn't care. The manager even told me that "we are not that generous."

People like it when you compliment them about blogs, books, etc. They like it that you are commenting even when you disagree in a civil way.


Casey Wheeler (caseywheeler) Jary wrote: "I frequent a self service car wash in my neighborhood. You drive up, choose your wash package, pay an attendant, and stay in the car through the cycle and then go to the vacuum section. It has been..."

Thanks for the feedback Jary. Glad it as positive.


Casey Wheeler (caseywheeler) Jacob wrote: "I've rarely had an experience like Jary's. It is not uncommon for me to leave both positive and negative reviews via Google Plus, Yelp, and Facebook. I would describe the most common responses as d..."

I'm not surprised - Disney has an excellent response reputation.


Casey Wheeler (caseywheeler) Jay wrote: "Casey wrote: "I am interested hearing from any of those who are reading the book have used social media to either complain about a business/service or compliment a business/service and what the end..."

Thanks Jay. IBM just doesn't get it, regardless of what Dave points on on pages 22-23. That is based on feedback from a number of current and former employees.


Casey Wheeler (caseywheeler) I found Dave's reference to trouble brewing in the Google culture interesting. Many other authors still point to the 20% creative time as a strong point in their culture. If it is truly eroding, the next 12-18 months will really tell.


Casey Wheeler (caseywheeler) In the Chapter on responsiveness, Dave uses Bank of America as an example of how not to do it. I have read a number of blog posts and talked to a number of people who have had the same typpe of unresponsive experience. It is no wonder that they are losing customers and market share. Eventually, they may wake up, but with their current attitude, I doubt it.


message 14: by Jay (new)

Jay Oza | 137 comments Casey wrote: "Jay wrote: "Casey wrote: "I am interested hearing from any of those who are reading the book have used social media to either complain about a business/service or compliment a business/service and ..."

I want to be fair to IBM.

My experience was primarily with their sales organization. I occasionally will go on interviews to see if I can still sell myself and learn from the experience. I learned a lot from the IBM experience which I will blog about to help others.


message 15: by Kara (last edited Jan 27, 2013 06:00PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kara (karaayako) To answer Casey's question:

I frequently write reviews on Yelp. Because I live in a fairly small city, the owners or employees of businesses have occasionally recognized me. After leaving positive reviews, owners have come up and thanked me, and once I even got a free manicure. For my more negative reviews, I've had places contact me directly to apologize or let me know how they will be incorporating my feedback going forward.

In the same vein, one of our 12books authors, Erik Qualman, reached out to me after I left a fairly scathing review of his book, Digital Leader: 5 Simple Keys to Success and Influence. I liked the concept quite a bit but really tore it apart for the poor grammar and editing. He commented on the review and has also messaged me here on Goodreads. I really appreciated that and will definitely be reading his future books. He earned himself a fan just by reaching out, being very nice, and listening to my feedback.


message 16: by Jay (new)

Jay Oza | 137 comments Kara wrote: "To answer Casey's question:

I frequently write reviews on Yelp. Because I live in a fairly small city, the owners or employees of businesses have occasionally recognized me. After leaving positive..."


I like your story about Eric Qualman. I like people who stand behind their product. Did he hire you as his copy editor? ;)


message 17: by Kara (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kara (karaayako) Jay wrote: "I like your story about Eric Qualman. I like people who stand behind their product. Did he hire you as his copy editor? ;) "

Haha, I wish!


message 18: by Kara (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kara (karaayako) I've gotten through a few chapters so far, and I'm really enjoying it. I don't think I've enjoyed one of our books this much since The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business.

The introduction mentions JetBlue and how it really focused on being responsive. This was timely for me. In my Master's program, we studied how both WestJet and JetBlue upgraded their systems and how differently the two projects went. JetBlue's transition, although not without minor hiccups, went much more smoothly than WestJet's, and it seems that one of the main reasons is that JetBlue considered its customers to be a stakeholder when it was creating its project plan. It informed its customers and better considered the impact of the upgrade on its customers before proceeding. (It could be argued that this was just better risk management, but there does seem to be a significant focus on the customer here which was lacking in WestJet's poor implementation.)

(For those who want to learn more about this, you can read an article about it here: http://on.wsj.com/WiPtON)


message 19: by Kara (last edited Jan 27, 2013 06:46PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kara (karaayako) Question for Dave:

I liked your chapter on authenticity, and I love the idea of not having a separate business versus personal online personality. However, doesn't there need to be, to some extent, a line between the two? For example, a CEO isn't just representing his or her opinions; as a public figure, those opinions can also impact how consumers view the product, so isn't there an obligation to shareholders? I'm not saying that a CEO necessarily needs to be inauthentic, but surely there are repercussions to genuine authenticity at all times that could impact stock price. (I think we can all look to Gene Morphis as a cautionary tale.)

So if there's a line, where does one draw it? I mean, obviously tweeting earnings is clearly over the line, but there are lots of gray area before we get that far.


Casey Wheeler (caseywheeler) Kara wrote: "I've gotten through a few chapters so far, and I'm really enjoying it. I don't think I've enjoyed one of our books this much since The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business.

T..."


Thanks for sharing.


Casey Wheeler (caseywheeler) Kara wrote: "Question for Dave:

I liked your chapter on authenticity, and I love the idea of not having a separate business versus personal online personality. However, doesn't there need to be, to some extent..."


Glad I wasn't the only one with that thought. You beat me to the punch.


message 22: by Ken (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ken | 17 comments Kara wrote: "JetBlue's transition, although not without minor hiccups, went much more smoothly than WestJet's, and it seems that one of the main reasons is that JetBlue considered its customers to be a stakeholder when it was creating its project plan. "

I recently heard David Barger (president of jetBlue) speak at a Forum that involved the topic of using social media. Barger mentioned that jetBlue uses the hashtag #culturematters to correspond with customers directly. Barger and jetBlue have embraced the use of social media. And, as Kerpen describes in his book, jetBlue grew substantially in a short period of time whereas most aviation companies experienced almost zero growth.


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