Challenge: 50 Books discussion

117 views
Finish Line 2013! Yay! > Mackenzie's 50+ for 2013

Comments Showing 1-50 of 65 (65 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Whoot! Another year, another 50 books or more to read. Also hoping to finish a couple of series that I have started and to be more assertive in NOT accepting book loans from people that I have to rework my reading list for.


message 2: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The first: Assassin's Apprentice (Farseer Trilogy, #1) by Robin Hobb

Finished this book this morning, and as fiction goes, I thought it was fantastic. The beginning is a bit slow because the protagonist is a withdrawn child that the reader has trouble connecting with. Yet, as the story goes and the boy opens up, you get attached to him, and I realized it was clever, not bad, writing. The rest is just an exciting, sometimes frustrating adventure. I am really looking forward to the next one!


message 3: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The second: Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
An enjoyable read about evolution, Nature, and humanity's place therein.


message 4: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Slow going! The third: The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

Because we loves it, precious!


message 5: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The fourth: Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

An interesting read. Supposedly "wildly funny", but I didn't get the humor. Maybe darkly funny. The writing is good though.


╟ ♫ Tima ♪ ╣ ♥ (tsunanisaurus) I've never heard Lolita described as "wildly funny", either. How bizarre! I'm due to re-read this soon, it's probably been close to 8 years since my last read. It's one that can only be once a decade, for me. Haha ;)


message 7: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (last edited Jan 24, 2013 03:14AM) (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The fifth: Mistral's Kiss (Meredith Gentry, #5) by Laurell K. Hamilton

Fifth of the year and fifth in a series, what a coinkydink! This book was done for something quick and fluffy and it didn't disappoint. I am really not sure where I will turn when I finish these for my fantasy smut fill since I feel that, given its niche, it's rather top shelf.


message 8: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The sixth: Darksong Rising (Spellsong Cycle, #3) by L.E. Modesitt Jr.

A world where song is the most powerful force to be reckoned with should appeal to any who claim a great affinity for music, or feel it is true here. In Modesitt's Spellsong Cycle, this is true, where one must be careful of the words they sing. In the third installment, the story continues to follow Anna's(a music teacher from Earth pulled to the medieval Erde where she is suddenly one of the most gifted, or cursed) trials as she tries to bring misogynistic, stubborn rulers to see her views on equality and justice. Between the thirty three provinces and the four countries surrounding the landlocked Defalk, this is a thankless, tiresome task. Her initial intentions start her on a path that lead her to commit more destruction than she ever wished or knew she could.

The inner monologue lines get a bit worn because she seems to run over the same concerns continuously. That does lend the reader a taste of the frustration that Anna must be experiencing. However, about midway through, it does lose a bit of it's pull and ends up being more annoying than heart rending. There is also the element of romantic interest, with the lover, for various reasons, kept at bay. Spoiler alert: The final chapter does include one of the more touching, less nauseating surrenderings to such feelings that I have yet encountered. So a good story idea and overall plot, repetitive on the bulk, but a redeeming and happy(though not truly concluded) ending.


message 9: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The seventh: Night Battle Poems (Penguin Poets) by William Logan

Eh. It was modern poetry. It didn't really blow my skirt up.


message 10: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The eighth: A Lick of Frost (Meredith Gentry, #6) by Laurell K. Hamilton

I have found that on nights when I do not have to work, it is cold and snowy on my mountain, and I do not wish to sleep so I do not utterly ruin my schedule, it is nice to have something to keep me engaged that does not induce drowsiness(despite the pot of coffee I am wont to drink). Since I have gone through all my Family Guy volumes more times than any self-respecting person should rightly admit to, it is nice to have easy fiction like what Miss Hamilton supplies. I woke up later in the night than usual and still managed to finish this piece by sunrise.

The sixth book in the series finds Miss Gentry meeting with her uncle, King Taranis, via mirror in a lawyers office about a false rape accusation brought against some of Merry's guards and lovers. Taranis reveals himself to be quite well in the grip of madness, though still one of the more powerful in the diminished sidhe courts. Following his attack, Meredith and her guards return to a L.A. mansion on loan from a fey friend to try report as well as to recover physically and emotionally. The reader is also given an insight into the creation of Frost, plus more.

Even at under 300 pages, there is comparatively little smut, and more focus on moving the story forward. Some more plot-oriented perusers will be glad for a few finally answered questions, while some will find themselves saying, "Now that just doesn't seem terribly plausible, even here." Still, for what the book is, I liked it, so it gets 3 stars.


message 11: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The ninth: Spell Of The Winter Wizard by Linda Lowery

This is a good book if one needs a fix for something cute and(for those who grew up with Choose-Your-Adventure books) nostalgic. Of course, it was written for children, so do not expect much beyond it tickling your fancy, instead of being plunged into an engrossing story.


message 12: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The tenth: Lisey's Story by Stephen King

If you have read just one Stephen King novel, then you are well acquainted with the format of his stories. There is the main character(s) who battles at least one internal and external force with plenty(or sometimes excessive amounts) of character background. The protagonist will suffer some damage and undergo some transformation, but will(most likely) ultimately triumph. Such was the pattern in "Lisey's Story".
The story opens with Lisa Landon(call me Lisey), a middle-aged widow, going through her two-years-late husband's effects in his writing studio with the "help" of her nutty older sister. She almost immediately flashes back to the long ago day when a Deep Space Cowboy shot her husband in cold blood on blistering hot asphalt. This exhumation is accompanied by the initial peeks at her internal struggle: wrestling with keeping a memory buried or remembering something she might not be able to forget again, punching the purple.
Lisey is trying to organize the defunct Landon's leftovers because she has been receiving pressure from various university English department types(who she has begun to call "incunks") about donating the potential treasure trove of unpublished typing. Shortly after enters the external conflict: a professor's accidental lackey, another Cowboy who threatens to "hurt [her] places [she] didn't let the boys touch at the junior high dances" if she does not deliver all the goods promptly. From there the story travels through time like Henry DeTamble, revealing Scott's life with Lisey, his childhood, and the knowledge of Boo'ya Moon, a world more beautiful and dangerous than Oz, and much closer.
While it may not be his best work, King's depiction of Scott and Lisey's relationship is still very touching. It shows the kind of love we should all be so fortunate to find in someone who gives us ice or hollers us back home. This element is what give the story that final push up to four stars.


╟ ♫ Tima ♪ ╣ ♥ (tsunanisaurus) ^-- I hadn't even heard of this book yet! Thanks for your review, I might try and find it to check it out!


message 14: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Tiffani wrote: "^-- I hadn't even heard of this book yet! Thanks for your review, I might try and find it to check it out!"

I hadn't either! It's one of his newer ones. A family friend gave me a pile of King books on a visit and there this was!


message 15: by Alison (new)

Alison G. (agriff22) | 540 comments I havent heard of it either guys! Ill have to put it on my neverending list!


message 16: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The eleventh: Wouldn't Take Nothing for My Journey Now by Maya Angelou

I went to the to library to get Maguire's last book in his Oz series, and came across this little number while browsing with my delusions of bettering myself. This is the first book by Maya Angelou I have read. I was surprised and pleased by how blunt the advice and stories in this work were. There is something for everyone to read or relate to, and I'd say about half of it anyone and everyone would be better for hearing or reading until it stays with them.


message 17: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twelfth: Snow White, Blood Red by Ellen Datlow

There seems to have been a rather large resurgence of fairy tales in media over the last couple of years. Stories are given make overs and new twists and spins for audiences of film and television. Yet, two decades ago, those same stories were being recollected and revamped by some of the biggest names in the fantasy genre's literary community. "Snow White, Blood Red" is one of those three collections.

A couple of the stories come from little known stories, or are of the authors own invention. A few are close to the originals in a more modern setting or from another characters point of view.

Not one of the stories was what I would call badly written, though it did seem a few of the writers purposely used the word "cock" to make the stories more "Adult". Aside from that, it was all rather well done.


message 18: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (last edited Mar 02, 2013 05:39PM) (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The thirteenth: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

Nothing perturbs me more than not quite getting the title of a book. This was the case with Maya Angelou's childhood autobiography. That is the only complaint I have of her chronicle about growing up a female Negro in 1930's Arkansas.

She opens with the story of her trek from California as a toddler with only her brother(and a porter for the first part of the journey). In Stamps, she lives with a religious pillar of grandmother, a crippled uncle, and an image of an ideal, though absent, mother and father. Most of the memories can evoke sorrow(even the telling of the time she laughed so hard in church that she lost bladder control), though that may not have been the intent.

Barred by race, gender, religion, and society, the story mirrors the times of one who might feel caged, but midst all the struggles, manages to find some happiness and love. Maybe I do get the title, after all.


╟ ♫ Tima ♪ ╣ ♥ (tsunanisaurus) The title is a poem of Maya Angelou's.

"The trapped bird represents an African American man or woman, while the free bird represents a white man or woman.The poem describes how she was the bird that was trapped and tied up and unable to reach freedom. The bird will continue to persevere and not give up. It sings about the hope of things to come, not necessarily of happiness."

Don't know if that helps clear up the title issue a little bit!


message 20: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Tima wrote: "The title is a poem of Maya Angelou's.

"The trapped bird represents an African American man or woman, while the free bird represents a white man or woman.The poem describes how she was the bird t..."


Yeah it does, thanks!


message 21: by Alison (new)

Alison G. (agriff22) | 540 comments Tima wrote: "The title is a poem of Maya Angelou's.

"The trapped bird represents an African American man or woman, while the free bird represents a white man or woman.The poem describes how she was the bird t..."


Ive read it too Tiffani and I didn't get the bird thing. It makes sense now! I have it at home so I'll have to read it again when I get back home. :)


message 22: by Rose (new)

Rose (obsessedreader9) | 215 comments Actually, Maya Angelou took the line "I know why the caged bird sings" from a poem of PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR, a black poet who deserves more credit and recognition than he has received.

Rose


╟ ♫ Tima ♪ ╣ ♥ (tsunanisaurus) Obsessedreader wrote: "Actually, Maya Angelou took the line "I know why the caged bird sings" from a poem of PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR, a black poet who deserves more credit and recognition than he has received.

..."


That is where she got the title line, yes. But from it she wrote a poem all her own and the meaning of that poem stands the same. :)


message 24: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Hmmm... I will have to look up this Mr. Dunbar. Thank y'all for your extracurricular research!


message 25: by Rose (new)

Rose (obsessedreader9) | 215 comments Frankly, I think the caged bird line is the most brilliant part of Maya Angelou's poem, and she didn't even create it. PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR is the genius.

Rose


message 26: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (last edited Apr 02, 2013 08:18AM) (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The fourteenth: Out of Oz (Wicked Years, #4) by Gregory Maguire

Maguire's final chapter in his take on the works of L Frank Baum can leave a reader a bit underwhelmed. The beginning section in which the reader follows Lady Glinda and her attempts at reading/hiding the Grimmerie is well done. The author truly immerses you in Glinda's mind and maintains the suspense around the former interim ruler's country estate. Even though Lady Glinda still comes across as shallow, she tries to do what she thinks is best and you cannot help but root for her.
After the story shifts away from Glinda, there are no sympathy-inspiring characters for quite a while. The main pull is curiosity over what will happen with the spell book. Rain's perspective is presented, but as a withdrawn child who cannot relate to the adults she has been entrusted to. The child keeps mostly to herself, while the others seem only to bicker and complain. Maguire takes us on their trek South into the Quadling lands well enough, but the events of the journey are not particularly engaging. Rain does not really seem to come into(or maybe out of?) herself until her teens, when the audience must also contend with Dorothy, who is now an annoying, teenage country bumpkin.
For the most part, Maguire does manage to do what I think he intended, and to do it well. It is simply a more subtle, subdued story, and thus underwhelming. With the exception of the character of Shell(who ends up mirroring his namesake, a dry, empty shell), a short discourse which dances around gender identity and its role in sexuality(which has no bearing on the direction of the story), and a few poor word or phrase choices, Maguire does weave a new and interesting take on a modern classic. However, it is not a must read.


message 27: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (last edited Apr 02, 2013 08:28AM) (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The fifteenth: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Millennium, #1) by Stieg Larsson
The biggest deterrent I had to beginning this book was hear-say. People who recommended it would say, "You HAVE to read this book. You'll love it. The first 100 pages or so are hard to get into, though."

LIES!

I did really like the book(not love), and it really is not hard to get into. The talk had lead me to expect some dry, textbook summary of Swedish economics, but it is just back story. So, I suppose of you have trouble getting into that, then...

But the main characters are likable, or at least sympathetic. The story keeps you trailing along after each intriguing revelation. The only possible complaint I had was the use of technological details about computers and even that is because of hear-say. The descriptors are unnecessary for readers like myself, who are relatively unschooled in the lingo. Supposedly, the details are incorrect(or dated, which makes sense because it's a book!) to those who are in the know.

"The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" is interesting and a fine selection for passing the time. It should definitely be given a try.


message 28: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The sixteenth: Swallowing Darkness (Meredith Gentry, #7) by Laurell K. Hamilton

I find myself running into the same problem I encountered when reading the first volumes of the Meredith Gentry series years ago: repetition. The protagonist is constantly hurled from one danger or sexual encounter to the next, with seemingly no time in between, and always with death for her immortals looming around the corner. It gets tiresome. The rebirths of the situations might have been more forgivable if the the prose had more variety. That's the worst of it.

In this seventh sally into the faerie mounds of Illinois, we find our heroine pregnant in a human hospital. She has been brought to this magic-dampening sanctuary after being abducted and raped by her uncle Taranis, the King of Light and Illusion. Merry's brief attempt at convalescence is interrupted by a surprise physical and psychological attack. From there she flies with the king of the slaugh to vengeance, then refuge in his kingdom. This is approximately where the repetitions really set in.

Every time any kind of trouble flairs up, Merry prays(which is not a terrible thing for the Goddess's chosen to do), but each time She is guiding her, it is made know by "the scent of roses" or "the scent of herbs and flowers". Where are the descriptions of the herbs? Or the flowers? Why always roses? Should not the signs of Goddess be as varied as She? But who am I to question Deity... There are also frequent reminders of little details such as relations or events that previously took place. This would not be so bad, if there had been time between reminders to forget the information. As is, you almost feel like the story is targeted at someone with a short term memory loss problem.

Not the worst thing ever written, but far from award-winning, this is a novel only to be read if you really want to know what happens next. It even ends in a very wrap-this-up manner. Which has left this reader wondering if he will bother to pick up the next volume, when this one already conveniently has "happily ever after" in the final paragraph.


message 29: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The seventeenth: Selected Poems by Paul Laurence Dunbar

As with many collections of poetry, some I liked, some I did not. After reading his works, I think there is no denying that Dunbar was a profound man.


message 30: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The eighteenth: Cinder (Lunar Chronicles, #1) by Marissa Meyer

This is an interesting take on the classic fairy tale, set in the future after Earth has been through two more World Wars and the moon has been colonized AND a new branch of humanoid has seemingly had time to evolve. It is Cinderella with science fiction instead of fantasy.

As young adult works go, I would say it is one of the more enjoyable reads. The main character is not completely helpless or reprehensible. The story is predictable, but the writing style is acceptable. Since the first book had a classic template to follow, I am unsure of whether or not to look forward to reading the sequel, but I guess I can really only find out one way.


message 31: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The nineteenth: The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett

Review to come.


message 32: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twentieth: Nightmares and Dreamscapes, Vols. 1-3 by Stephen King

Like many collections of short stories, this one had a few that were really good, most were good, a couple okay, and one or two sections just dragged, even with audio trudging through for me. Overall, I figured it was still worth 4 stars, especially because of some of the readers.


message 33: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Brown | 111 comments Mackenzie wrote: "The sixteenth: Swallowing Darkness (Meredith Gentry, #7) by Laurell K. Hamilton

I find myself running into the same problem I encountered when reading the first volumes of the Meredith Gentry series years ago: repetition...."


I feel the same way about LKH's other series (Anita Blake)! I read a bunch of them last year, tossed 'em aside as they became repetitive, and am currently trying to get through the remaining (if she will ever stop writing them!). I just can't let a series go... I must choose shorter ones in the future.

On another note, I love Stephen King and will have to read Lisey's Story. It does sound interesting.


message 34: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Rebecca wrote: "Mackenzie wrote: "The sixteenth: Swallowing Darkness (Meredith Gentry, #7) by Laurell K. Hamilton

I find myself running into the same problem I encountered when reading the first volumes of the Meredith Gentry series year..."


I'm glad you told me that so I will not waste time with the Anita Blake series. There should be a rule about series: read them posthumously so the author cannot write more! XD

Lisey's Story is totally worth it. It was a little rough at the start, but then it gets you hooked.


message 35: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty-first: The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran


message 36: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty-second: Cell by Stephen King
When I give people suggested works by Stephen King, let's just say this one will not be making it onto that list.


message 37: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty-third: Please God Let it Be Herpes A Heartfelt Quest For Love and Companionship by Carlos Kotkin

This book was not as funny as one would expect when diving into a comedy. I could count the number and types of amusement. Two smirks, two silent chuckles, and two laughs... Out of almost 300 pages. Really it was more sad. The writing is okay, but the format kind of repetitive. "Here's a girl I tried to date, it didn't work. Here's a girl I tried to date, it didn't work." I might recommend it to straight males who are really into action films.


message 38: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty-fourth: Four Centuries of Great Love Poems (Borders Classics) by Paul Dunbar

Most of these were alright, some were pretty good, and a few I really liked.


message 39: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty fifth: Lamb The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore

I've finished Christopher Moore's "Lamb". It was not a laugh-out-loud funny novel for me, but there were plenty of snickers and overall it was imaginative and enjoyable. Also, as sort of an unsought bonus, it makes the persona of Jesus a little easier to relate to. Not that the book is any kind of holy writ or spiritual primer. It is fiction, pure and simple, but by giving the Christ a background story and dimensions beyond superhumanly compassionate, the idea of Jesus can become a little more easily graspable for some who may be struggling with His image.


message 40: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty-sixth: Royal Assassin (Farseer Trilogy, #2) by Robin Hobb

Hobb's "Royal Assassin" is the continuation of the Farseer Trilogy. The story opens with FitzChivalry's slow convalescence from the attack by his uncle, the unscrupulous Prince Regal, and slow is the word to describe the pace of this novel. It is an apt device because it mirrors the long periods of waiting Fitz must endure, but it also makes parts of the book hard to endure. Frustrating in the all the loose ends, this is a successful bridgework in a trilogy that leaves the reader eager to begin the final part of the story.


╟ ♫ Tima ♪ ╣ ♥ (tsunanisaurus) Glad you finished Lamb :)


message 42: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Tima wrote: "Glad you finished Lamb :)"

I'm glad I took your suggestion. I do not know what I was expecting, but I liked it a lot more than I would have guessed.


message 43: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty-seventh: The Shadow Sorceress (Spellsong Cycle, #4) by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
The only reason this book did not get only one star was the ending. The rest of the novel too closely follows the descriptive and narrative paradigms of the first three installments to make this new adventure any kind of new. Even the "new" protagonist is a carbon copy of the old. The introduction of something mildly interesting made me feel it was not a total loss, but I would not suggest this to anyone and I dread opening the final book.


message 44: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty-eighth: Isaac Asimovs Magic World Of Fantasy by Isaac Asimov

A fun collection of short stories. As with all such volumes, some were hits, some missed. Still a good read for those who enjoy the sci-fi and fantasy genres.


╟ ♫ Tima ♪ ╣ ♥ (tsunanisaurus) Mackenzie wrote: "Tima wrote: "Glad you finished Lamb :)"

I'm glad I took your suggestion. I do not know what I was expecting, but I liked it a lot more than I would have guessed."


I wish I actually got notifications on a regular basis, haha! I'm very glad you got more than you bargained for - and not in a negative way! I think you'd like some of his lighter stuff, as well.


message 46: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Tima wrote: "Mackenzie wrote: "Tima wrote: "Glad you finished Lamb :)"

I'm glad I took your suggestion. I do not know what I was expecting, but I liked it a lot more than I would have guessed."

I wish I actua..."


I'll have to pick up another one or two. I'll probably be starting Palaniuk's "Damned" to get a weird bit of balance.


╟ ♫ Tima ♪ ╣ ♥ (tsunanisaurus) Mackenzie wrote: "I'll have to pick up another one or two. I'll probably be starting Palaniuk's "Damned" to get a weird bit of balance. "

You know, I was not a fan of that book when I read it. I picked it up at his signing when it was released and just remember feeling very let down afterward. I'll be curious to hear what you end up thinking of it.


message 48: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
Tima wrote: "Mackenzie wrote: "I'll have to pick up another one or two. I'll probably be starting Palaniuk's "Damned" to get a weird bit of balance. "

You know, I was not a fan of that book when I read it. I p..."


That's good to know going in. I was not really sure what to expect. The only book I have read by him is "Haunted" and that one was... crazy.


message 49: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The twenty-ninth: Bared to You (Crossfire, #1) by Sylvia Day

The first Crossfire novel has not really enticed me to read the rest of the series. It is about a whirlwind romance begun by two people with major hang ups concerning sex and relationships. It's also full of those sex scenes designed to make it a masturbatory aid. The characters' personalities, their relationship-crippling issues, and the time frame for all these events did not add up to a very sexy or appealing story for me, though.


message 50: by Mackenzie, Group Read Curator (new)

Mackenzie | 295 comments Mod
The thirtieth: Kokoro

Eh. I like Haruki Murakami better.


« previous 1
back to top