Book Loving Kiwis discussion

Trouble In Mind: Stories From A Neuropsychologist's Casebook
This topic is about Trouble In Mind
36 views
Archives > Trouble in Mind

Comments Showing 1-12 of 12 (12 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Angie (last edited Jan 08, 2013 01:11AM) (new)

Angie (seren-lucy) | 1147 comments Trouble In Mind: Stories From A Neuropsychologist's Casebook by BLK group member Jenni Ogden is our author member read for January.

Leave a message below if you intend to read this book during January.

Participating:
Kathleen
Vikki
Mariana
Ella's Gran
Deb


Kathleen Dixon (kiwikathleen) | 1476 comments A new year and I'm back on track! I have this reserved at the library and it's "in transit" as we speak!


message 3: by Vikki (new) - added it

Vikki | 1 comments I have reserved this also.


Mariana | 33 comments I'm in. I've just requested this book from the library.


message 5: by Angie (new)

Angie (seren-lucy) | 1147 comments Awesome. I'll try and track down Jenni so that she can join in on this discussion and answer any questions.
Great to see some new names joining our 'older' group members.


message 6: by Lesley (new)

Lesley | 1570 comments I read bits of these case stories when I was cataloguing the book for work - because I need to and also I had an interest in the stories on Aphasia at the time. My friend's mother had just had a minor stroke at the age of 94 and it was quite helpful reading those stories to gain an understanding of what was happening and the treatment. I have just been reading them again tonight comparing her progress.

What I liked is the factual, clear explanations of what had happened, the degrees of damage that could occur and how the therapies worked and all written in plain, easy to understand language.


message 7: by Angie (new)

Angie (seren-lucy) | 1147 comments The reply I received from Jenni. Yay, she's going to join in with the discussion.

Hi Angie,
Yes, absolutely! I am delighted my book was pulled out of the hat and hope readers find it interesting. Given it is beach-read time, if a reader doesn't feel like reading the more "technical" stuff about the brain (Introductory Chapter 1), I suggest going straight to the case study chapters, and indeed these can be read in any order. The cases are patients similar to those in Oliver Sacks' "The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat."
I notice Amazon now has a Kindle edition of "Trouble In Mind" for US$17.59.

Thanks so much for adding this ti your NZ reads.
I look forward to participating in the discussion thread.
Cheers,
Jenni


message 8: by Deb (new) - added it

Deb (soulhaven) | 25 comments I'm tempted to give this one a go. A little tentative to commit just yet, though. Crazy time around here at the mo'. I'll pop in here when I can, though. & grab a copy soon, if I can.


Kathleen Dixon (kiwikathleen) | 1476 comments I just finished this book and read almost every word - just skimmed a little of the technical stuff - Jenni writes very readably! I read Fractured Minds: A Case-Study Approach to Clinical Neuropsychology last year and was sufficiently fascinated by it to be interested in reading this as well, and I wasn't disappointed.

I found it heartening too, in a way, because my husband recently had a stroke - but it could have been much worse. This book has shown me some clear examples, and has also added to my insight, so when they tell me my husband has some cognitive impairment I have a little bit of understanding about what that means. It felt good to be able to say to the Occupational Therapist (when they brought him home for an assessment last week) that I was reading this book (and the OT said Yes, she knew of Jenni Ogden!).


Jenni Ogden (jenniogden) | 7 comments Thanks Ella's Gran and Katherine, It is always so good to hear that my writings have been either enjoyed or helpful and preferably both! Especially humbling to read your comment that you read almost every word, Kathleen! I would love to know if you think it is more reader friendly (for the general reader, rather than neuropsychologists) than Fractured Minds?
Cheers, Jenni


Kathleen Dixon (kiwikathleen) | 1476 comments Jenni wrote: "I would love to know if you think it is more reader friendly (for the general reader, rather than neuropsychologists) than Fractured Minds?"

Without putting the two books side by side it's a bit hard to answer that, but I think probably it is. I thought I was going to skim through the people who had also been written about in Fractured Minds, but I didn't skim. So I think that must have been because of the 'friendlier" style.


Jenni Ogden (jenniogden) | 7 comments Kathleen wrote: "Jenni wrote: "I would love to know if you think it is more reader friendly (for the general reader, rather than neuropsychologists) than Fractured Minds?"

Without putting the two books side by sid..."


Thanks Kathleen, that is good to know.


back to top