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Moby Dick Discussion > Chapter 89: Fast-Fish and Loose-Fish

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message 1: by Hayes (last edited Dec 30, 2012 10:13AM) (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Chapter 89: Fast-Fish and Loose-Fish
http://www.mobydickbigread.com/chapte...
Read by Jane Sharp
Artist: Jessica Voorsanger

Blog: http://ahistoryofnewyork.com/2012/12/...


message 2: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) A thought occurred to me...

My father used to use the expression "to play fast and loose", which I always took to mean (and I think he did too) to be wild. But seeing it from the perspective of this chapter, I think it really means something like to "eat your cake and have it too", or to play something both ways, or something similar.

Very interesting.


message 3: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) Oh, well done. That feels right. It's one of those phrases I've heard and never thought about the derivation of - and this fits perfectly. I've usually heard of it ending "play fast and loose with the rules" - it works.


message 4: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) That was the expression, to play fast and loose with the rules! Brava. It does work, doesn't it?


message 5: by Vikk (new)

Vikk Simmons (downthewriterspath) | 173 comments Mod
Hayes wrote: "A thought occurred to me...

My father used to use the expression "to play fast and loose", which I always took to mean (and I think he did too) to be wild. But seeing it from the perspective of th..."


Interesting. At some point I think I've understood the term from Melville's perspective. Perhaps from my grandparents.


message 6: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) I thought I had already listened to this chapter, but I'm just getting to it now... And I may be stretching it, but I wonder: particularly with the analogy of the wife cut loose by the husband, is this some part of the origin of "loose woman"?

I think I am stretching.

But it's kind of fun.


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