Five Minute Bible Story Series discussion

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Bible stories > How do we separate Bible stories from fairy tales?

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message 1: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 18 comments Mod
A lot of kids grow up around Bible stories. Noah's ark. The burning bush. Santa Claus? Cinderella? Some grow up knowing they're all just fairy tales. Others decide some stories are true exactly the way they learned them, and will fight for the right to have three wise men whatever the Bible says. And others...?


message 2: by Jean (new)

Jean (jeanatwritersmill) | 4 comments I would say it's a fine line between fairy tales, folk myths, Bible stories. The Bible was written in ancient times, the stories having survived probably generations of verbal storytelling before they were ever written down. Once written down, who's to say what "lessons" the scribes wanted to ascribe to these tales. I think the bible stories can be appreciated as a certain type of Middle Eastern folk mythology, even though some of it can be historically grounded. All the better!


message 3: by Lee (new)

Lee Harmon (DubiousDisciple) | 5 comments The word "myth" has developed a bit of a derogatory label, as in "that's only a myth." But our myths are true or false on a much higher level than purely historical accuracy. The Enlightenment has ruined us. ;)


message 4: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 18 comments Mod
It's interesting how even a lot of modern history reads so differently when told from a different point of view. And the writers in the Bible clearly had a point of view--all writers do.


message 5: by Janalyn (new)

Janalyn Voigt (janalynvoigt) Sheila wrote: "It's interesting how even a lot of modern history reads so differently when told from a different point of view. And the writers in the Bible clearly had a point of view--all writers do."

First person, personal, I would say.


message 6: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 18 comments Mod
Janalyn wrote: "First person, personal, I would say. "

Or first person omniscient? But I really like the fact that we have four Gospels, each with a slightly different flavor--kind of emphasizes that there were real people taking notice (and making notes).


message 7: by Jean (last edited Jan 12, 2013 02:34PM) (new)

Jean (jeanatwritersmill) | 4 comments I doubt that any of it was written first person at all from personal experience. What I've always heard is that the Old Testament tales were oral traditions before they were ever written down. As for the Gospels, hundreds of years went by before they appeared under the names of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, who were long gone by the time the stories were formalized as the Gospels. For some reason, their names stuck to the stories that were attributed to them. Taking notes? Would they have carried pencils? Sharp rocks to carve on handy stone tablets? God-pods? (I had to say it.)


message 8: by Lee (new)

Lee Harmon (DubiousDisciple) | 5 comments Aw, Jean, don't be a party pooper. "First person omniscient" has such a nice ring to it.

Not quite "hundred of years" btw. ;)


message 9: by Jean (new)

Jean (jeanatwritersmill) | 4 comments I agree; Sheila has a way with words. "First person omniscient" is clever; she should copyright that!


message 10: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 18 comments Mod
Love the God-pods Jean :)


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