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Monthly Read Nominations > January Book?

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message 1: by Gavin (new)

Gavin | 108 comments Mod
Time to start nominations for January!! We are a little late getting this up and running so there is only a few days for nominations!.

I hope more of you will choose to nominate a book. PLEASE get involved and take part guys.

Has to be:

- A book we haven't read before, but can be a previously nominated.
- A stand-alone or first in the series.
- You can nominate a maximum of two books.
- Has to be fiction.
- Biographies and autobiographies that border towards fiction are acceptable.

Please post you nominations by December 31st!!

Happy nominations.


message 2: by Gavin (new)

Gavin | 108 comments Mod
I'm going to nominate a couple of books that are due to hit the big screen anytime now.

Beautiful Creatures Beautiful Creatures (Caster Chronicles, #1) by Kami Garcia by Kami Garcia

PLOT:

There were no surprises in Gatlin County.
We were pretty much the epicenter of the middle of nowhere.
At least, that's what I thought.
Turns out, I couldn't have been more wrong.
There was a curse.
There was a girl.
And in the end, there was a grave.

Lena Duchannes is unlike anyone the small Southern town of Gatlin has ever seen, and she's struggling to conceal her power and a curse that has haunted her family for generations. But even within the overgrown gardens, murky swamps and crumbling graveyards of the forgotten South, a secret cannot stay hidden forever.

Ethan Wate, who has been counting the months until he can escape from Gatlin, is haunted by dreams of a beautiful girl he has never met. When Lena moves into the town's oldest and most infamous plantation, Ethan is inexplicably drawn to her and determined to uncover the connection between them.

In a town with no surprises, one secret could change everything.


Killing Floor Killing Floor (Jack Reacher, #1) by Lee Child by Lee Child

PLOT:

Welcome to Margrave, Georgia—but don't get too attached to the townsfolk, who are either in on a giant conspiracy, or hurtling toward violent deaths, or both.

There's not much of a welcome for Jack Reacher, a casualty of the Army's peace dividend who's drifted into town idly looking for traces of a long dead black jazzman. Not only do the local cops arrest him for murder, but the chief of police turns eyewitness to place him on the scene, even though Reacher was getting on a bus in Tampa at the time. Two surprises follow: The murdered man wasn't the only victim, and he was Reacher's brother whom he hadn't seen in seven years. So Reacher, who so far hasn't had anything personal against the crooks who set him up for a weekend in the state pen at Warburton, clicks into overdrive.

Banking on the help of the only two people in Margrave he can trust—a Harvard-educated chief of detectives who hasn't been on the job long enough to be on the take, and a smart, scrappy officer who's taken him to her bed— he sets out methodically in his brother's footsteps, trying to figure out why his cellmate in Warburton, a panicky banker whose cell-phone number turned up in Joe's shoe, confessed to a murder he obviously didn't commit; trying to figure out why all the out-of-towners on Joe's list of recent contacts were as dead as he was; and trying to stop the local carnage or at least direct it in more positive ways. Though the testosterone flows as freely as printer's ink, Reacher is an unobtrusively sharp detective in his quieter moments—not that there are many of them to judge by.

Despite the crude, tough-naïf narration, debut novelist Child serves up a big, rangy plot, menace as palpable as a ticking bomb, and enough battered corpses to make an undertaker grin.

Winner of the 1998 Barry Award for Best First Novel, awarded by Deadly Pleasures magazine.

Even though the hero in Killing Floor is meant to be something like 6'4. Tiny Tom Cruise has decided to cast himself in the role. If nothing else the differences between the book and the movie should be interesting!!!.


message 3: by Heather B (new)

Heather B (heatherbenson) The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton

The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton

From the #1 internationally bestselling author of The House at Riverton, a novel that takes the reader on an unforgettable journey through generations and across continents as two women try to uncover their family’s secret past

A tiny girl is abandoned on a ship headed for Australia in 1913. She arrives completely alone with nothing but a small suitcase containing a few clothes and a single book—a beautiful volume of fairy tales. She is taken in by the dockmaster and his wife and raised as their own. On her twenty-fi rst birthday, they tell her the truth, and with her sense of self shattered and very little to go on, "Nell" sets out to trace her real identity. Her quest leads her to Blackhurst Manor on the Cornish coast and the secrets of the doomed Mountrachet family. But it is not until her granddaughter, Cassandra, takes up the search after Nell’s death that all the pieces of the puzzle are assembled. A spellbinding tale of mystery and self-discovery, The Forgotten Garden will take hold of your imagination and never let go.


Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

"It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife."

So begins Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen's witty comedy of manners--one of the most popular novels of all time--that features splendidly civilized sparring between the proud Mr. Darcy and the prejudiced Elizabeth Bennet as they play out their spirited courtship in a series of eighteenth-century drawing-room intrigues. Renowned literary critic and historian George Saintsbury in 1894 declared it the "most perfect, the most characteristic, the most eminently quintessential of its author's works," and Eudora Welty in the twntieth century described it as "irresistible and as nearly flawless as any fiction could be."

Introduction by Anna Quindlen.
Commentary by Margaret Oliphant, George Saintsbury, Mark Twain, A.C. Bradley, Walter A. Raleigh, and Virginia Woolf.

Anna Quindlen is the winner of the 1992 Pulitzer Prize for commentary and the author of three bestselling novels, most recently Black and Blue, a children's book, Happily Ever After, and an inspirational book, A Short Guide to a Happy Life.



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