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Chit Chat & All That > Cultural differences

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message 1: by Trisha (new)

Trisha | 492 comments Has anyone noticed distinct differences in writing depending on where the author is from? For example, I have read a few novels by Swedish authors and found them to be much more violent and graphic. I also read three novels by different Albanian authors and each one mentioned the bullet that is given to the husband on his wedding night, giving him permission to kill his wife should she dishonor him. I found that to be shocking, but all three of the novels mentioned it and, in the past, that was a regularly practiced tradition. Have you guys noticed and distinct writing styles that reflect the authors' countries?


message 2: by Emily (new)

Emily (The Litertarian) (emmaleighbug) I read one by a Norwegian author, Out Stealing Horses, that had a very bleak tone, though I haven't read any other Per Petterson novels to get a feel if it's his tone as an author, or just that particular story.

I also read a book, Let the Northern Lights Erase Your Name, that was written by a girl in California, but it's about a girl who travels to Finland to find out more about her family/past, and that was a pretty bleak one too. Out Stealing Horses


message 3: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments A wedding night bullet? That's a scary tradition ... if you're a woman! :-o


message 4: by Tytti (new)

Tytti | 1092 comments Emma wrote: "I also read a book, Let the Northern Lights Erase Your Name, that was written by a girl in California, but it's about a girl who travels to Finland to find out more about her family/past, and that was a pretty bleak one too."

Hah, that is one of those books which makes me wonder if the setting has been chosen just because it sounds exotic to Americans.


message 5: by Liz_ (new)

Liz_ Trisha wrote: "I have read a few novels by Swedish authors and found them to be much more violent and graphic"

Were they all in the same genre? Because if you're reading, say, crime novels, you'd sort of expect violence.

I haven't noticed any obvious cultural differences in writing style. The bullet thing is a cultural tradition, which is a completely different issue.


message 6: by Luna (last edited Apr 24, 2014 09:52AM) (new)

  Luna  (lunaluss) Trisha wrote: "Has anyone noticed distinct differences in writing depending on where the author is from? For example, I have read a few novels by Swedish authors and found them to be much more violent and graphi..."

IMO, the environment of the author indeed plays an important role in the shape that a novel takes. This of course if the author chooses to relate accurately where they come from, how people live there, the kind of traditions they have etc.

There are some customs that may be regarded as violent even inhuman for people who belong to different cultures. As a case, I take 'Sati' which was a practice that took place in India, and Sati means incinerating a widow when her husband dies. To me, this is indeed shoking, but back then Indians regarded it as a legimate practice since their culture made it so. An Indian author may relate this tradition differently than a foreign author. And each would give enough reasons to defend their different positions.


message 7: by Daisy (new)

Daisy (bellisperennis) LunaBelle wrote: "The environment of the author indeed plays an important role in the shape that a novel takes.

Lately I have been reading books by authors from war-torn regions, or who have experienced war. It is most decidedly, and obviously, a different style. Along with many characters of style it is emotionally powerful, heartbreaking and evinces a cathartic and traumatic voice and experience.


message 8: by Sara (new)

Sara Weather (saraweather) Probably, the most I notice it in is in Japanese authors who have a certain way they view things. I think it is interesting because I can see these views in Japanese dramas too.


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