The Passage (The Passage, #1) The Passage discussion


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First 8 years, good or bad?

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Gary Welch In the second half of this book the children were left to have a childhood for the first 8 years of their life and not exposed to the darkness of the world. what are your feelings?

My mom and I did not agree on this. I thought it was nice to let them have a childhood.


Gary Welch My mom did not like the fact they did not raise or live with their children. I have a 3 year old so I can see where she is coming from, but still 8 years of a childhood is better then nothing.


Sharon Dwyer As nice as it may seem, the cruelty of throwing the truth at them all at once negated those first eight years. After living in total innocence the reality throws them into total confusion. Wrong in every aspect. When they are let out into the real world they are expected to become adults right away with training and manning the walls. So what good did those eight years do other than have them live in a fantasy world that fell apart in a matter of minutes at eight years old and not having a close parent there with them.
Made no sense to me. Athough I did like that book and the next one.


Lynne I almost gave up on this book at the start. Didn't care for the first 1/3 or so, managed to hang on and did enjoy the next 2/3 much more. Not sure if I'll continue reading the next installment.


Becky Lynne wrote: "I almost gave up on this book at the start. Didn't care for the first 1/3 or so, managed to hang on and did enjoy the next 2/3 much more. Not sure if I'll continue reading the next installment."

I agree with you, Lynn... I kept holding on that the book would get better, and it did, somewhat. Book 2 was similar - hard to get through. But there is something about the story that is so different and interesting that I want to find out what happens next.


Becky I liked that they gave the children the Sancturary. And I liked how the young mothers lived in house for a time. But keep in mind that the Sancturary serves another purpose; with so much to be done in such a small community, the parents have a chance to tend to their responsibilities knowing the children are in a safe place. As they say, it takes a village.


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Rob Falcon I liked the idea of having kids kept from the ugly truth. I have some friends that tell their kids there is no Santa, when there obviously is! The "magic" is only available for so long, why push a harsh reality so quickly.


Salem Patterson Becky wrote: "But keep in mind that the Sancturary serves another purpose; with so much to be done..."

Very good point, Becky! I don't believe I ever thought about it from that aspect.


Gary Welch Sharon wrote: "As nice as it may seem, the cruelty of throwing the truth at them all at once negated those first eight years. After living in total innocence the reality throws them into total confusion. Wrong in..."

There are times in the book the characters talk about times spent at the school, positively. They would not have that if they were just raised into the current world.

But now that I have read the second book, and seen a different approach, Texas, I would still want those 8 years.


Becky Salem wrote: "Becky wrote: "But keep in mind that the Sancturary serves another purpose; with so much to be done..."

Very good point, Becky! I don't believe I ever thought about it from that aspect."


Thanks, Salem! It's basicly a glorified daycare, when you really think about it.


Andrew Ogilvie I think the idea of a sanctuary is good, but they should prep the kids more when they leave.

In reality the World, in the book, is not safe. And danger can easily enter the sanctuary.

But as many have said before its important to have a childhood.


Tracy I like that they tried to give them an innocent childhood. I do think that they sheltered them a little too much though. The children could have been exposed to the reality of the outside world a little more without ruining their opportunity of having a relatively carefree childhood. If they had been slightly exposed then it would not have been such a harsh shock when they turned 8.


Becky Tracy wrote: "I like that they tried to give them an innocent childhood. I do think that they sheltered them a little too much though. The children could have been exposed to the reality of the outside world a..."

Good point! It makes me think that if it is all they know, then it is their 'normal'.


Tracy Becky wrote: It makes me think that if it is all they know, then it is their 'normal'.

Exactly. It is "normal" for them as they have never known anything else. For example I used to have a friend who was deaf. Whenever anyone would try to have pity on her or anything she would always say that it was normal for her as she never knew what it would have been like to be able to hear - she had no way to know what she was "missing". She said if she had lost her hearing when she was older then yes it would have sucked because she would have known what was missing but she never knew any different so it was normal for her.


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