The Next Best Book Club discussion

352 views
Personal Reading Goals > Jeane her reading ....

Comments Showing 1-50 of 97 (97 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Last year i had a goal to try to read 50 books but managed to finish with 63. Main difference with this year is that I didn't work last year. Now with a full time job I am going to be ambitious and hope for 65......

But my main goal is actually to read mainly books that were already on my tbr mountains, read books about or set in Ireland(as I came living here) and to participate in the season challenges on here.

Books I hope to read this year:

The Mists of Avalon (first book I put on my first list about five years ago and still didn't read it)
something by Dorris Lessing
an unread John Steinbeck book
The House of the Spirits
Mountains Beyond Mountains The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Man Who Would Cure the World
The Secret Life of Bees
The Audacity of Hope Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream
Brisingr

For the spring challenge I am thinking about reading the following books:
Angela's Ashes
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea
something by or about Yeats
The Red and the Green
The Copper Beech
The Book Thief
something by marian keyes
something by or abour Jane Goodall
Nights of Rain and Stars


message 2: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments So far I read since 1/1/09:

1. Sinn Fein A Hundred Turbulent Years (very interesting)
2.Suffer the Little Children A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery(good like all of her mysteries)
3.What Are You Like? A Novel (weird)
4. Crazy as Chocolate (okay, weird but liked it in the end)
5. Uninvited (okay, interesting to read a chinese style book)
6. Girl with a Pearl Earring(loved the book, very strong story)
7.Moby Dick(after 3-4 tries I managed after four years to finish it thanks to the winter challenge)
8. A Long Way Down9didn't like it. too 21century pushy london way talking style and weird story)
9. I'm Not Scared(good, surprising book.the beginning doesn't show much of what the story will become, which is surprising and very good)
10.Angels A Novel(thought this would be a light, empty story but it was great and lots of fun reading it)
11. April in Paris A Novel(nice, surprising and good story)
12. A Question of Blood(knew the stories only from tv but loved the first book to read about rebus as much as the tv series.not my last one)
13. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell(so happy that I read this huge book. The beginning was weird and didn't let you know much of how the story would go. Lots happened in the end and i just completly enjoyed reading this book)


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

Jeane: you will be able to read over 65 with how many books you read so far this time.




message 4: by Ann from S.C. (new)

Ann from S.C. | 1395 comments Great start so far!!!


message 5: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Emilee wrote: "Jeane: you will be able to read over 65 with how many books you read so far this time.

"


that is another reason I am hoping to go for 65. I know there are moments that ebcause of different reasons you read less but 13 in two months would mean78 in 12 months.....And I read some big ones this year, like jonathan strange with 1006 pages.....
I am curious to see at the end of this year what I read....so untraditional of what I normal read.


message 6: by Atishay (new)

Atishay | 1451 comments Jeane, you forgot to add 'The Brave' in your this year's to read list. ;)


message 7: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Atishay wrote: "Jeane, you forgot to add 'The Brave' in your this year's to read list. ;)"

Atishay, that isn't a goal...a goal is something you will try....The Brave isn't something I will try it is just plainly something I will do!:-)


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Jeane: your right in January I didn't read as much but just made it up in February.


message 9: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments I don't know where to put this and as I have three books to read by her and want to read all of them, it is kind of a goal thing. I found it in the february newsletter of Goodreads, so it will be somewhere around here too but jsut wanted to share this.

10 Questions with Maeve Binchy
February, 2009

Maeve Binchy
Irish writer Maeve Binchy stumbled upon her career by accident. As a young teacher traveling in Israel, she wrote a stirring letter home to her parents. Her father typed it up and sent it to The Irish Independent, which published the dispatch and launched what would become a career spanning several decades. Still going strong at 68, despite a brush with heart failure in 2002, Binchy has penned countless bestselling novels about small-town Ireland. Perhaps best known for Circle of Friends and Tara Road (a former Oprah's Book Club selection), Binchy talked with Goodreads about her new book, Heart and Soul, and why you should never invite more than four Irish people to a dinner party.

Goodreads: Heart and Soul is set in a heart clinic. Why did you choose this setting and how does it influence the story?

Maeve Binchy: I set Heart and Soul in a heart clinic because I attend one myself as a patient. I have always found it a place of hope and optimism, where they teach you how to manage your heart disease and not to be afraid of it. When I was young, if anyone had a heart attack, we thought it was goodbye. But not nowadays. It semed like a good place to set a story, a place where people were slowly getting courage to live their lives to the full. And I wanted to make it cheerful and postive and funny, which is what we all need.

GR: Your books capture the culture of Ireland. Although Ireland has not escaped the recent economic downturn, how has Ireland's rapid growth—finally joining the ranks of the world's wealthiest countries following centuries of poverty—influenced your storytelling?

MB: Ireland has changed a great deal in my lifetime. People became much more wealthy after we joined the European Union. The influence of the Catholic Church changed; once we feared the clergy and were in awe of them, and now it is much more communal. Once no foreigners came to work here, because there wasn't enough work for ourselves, but now it's multicultural, and you can hear twenty languages being spoken all around you. It has been a great help to the country and given us all more confidence.

When I started writing I used to concentrate on the '50s and '60s, but I needed to try to become more modern and catch up on today's Ireland. So I started to watch the young Irish people and talk to them as if they were a different tribe, which in many ways they are! I discovered that they are not so different from my generation. They have more freedom, more responsibility, and more courage than we had, but they also have areas of uncertainty and unrequited love as we all did.

GR: Your novels often explore the concept of love. Can you name a few of your favorite literary love stories?

MB: I think most people read a love story long before they ever know what true love is like. So we remember the great passions that we read about when we were young. I loved the story of Antony and Cleopatra, and how Antony allowed himself to dally with the Queen of Egypt when he should have been back in Rome watching his back. I liked the frenetic troubled romances in F. Scott Fitzgerald, and the changing patterns of Scarlett O'Hara's love life in Gone with the Wind.

GR: The newest book centers on Clara, the doctor in charge of the clinic, but the book also follows quite an ensemble of characters with intertwining stories. How does your work within the discipline of short story writing contribute to your work within the novel genre?

MB: I like to concentrate on the bit part players, the supporting cast as well as the main characters. So it's often interesting to pause and follow somebody home to a different life while still connecting them to the main story. Then when that person appears again it's like meeting an old friend. Because I do write short stories, I suppose I find it easy to slip into someone's life for a short time and then leave.

GR: New characters are joined by a few from past books, including Nora from Evening Class, Maud and Simon from Scarlet Feather, and Quentins itself (if I can call a restaurant a character). How did you decide which characters to bring back to life?

MB: I decided to bring back characters whose lives were not finished and tidied up. I was even wondering myself would Vonnie ever find her long-lost son? Would Signora be happy when she married Aidan? How would the twins Maud and Simon turn out when they stopped being twelve-year-olds? I so enjoyed meeting them all again, and I think the readers like it too.

GR: Irish culture is known for its storytelling, both in the oral and written tradition. Do you also enjoy telling stories out loud? Are you the life of the dinner party?

MB: The Irish do love telling stories, and we are suspicious of people who don't have long, complicated conversations. There used to be a rule in etiquette books that you should invite four talkers and four listeners to a dinner party. That doesn't work in Ireland, because nobody knows four listeners. I do talk a lot at dinner parties. I hope not too much, but then I love other people to talk as well. I am edgy and anxious when people just nod and smile instead of having views on every subject under the sun.

GR: What are you working on next?

MB: I am working at the moment on writing a three-page outline for another novel. I must make it interesting enough for the publishers to like it and give me the go-ahead. It should be in the same style as the books I have already written, but not visit the same topics and repeat myself.

GR: Describe a typical day spent writing. Do you have any unusual writing habits?

MB: A typical day is breakfast (grapefruit and Irish soda bread and tea,) then upstairs to a big, bright workroom. We have one long desk: my husband (Gordon Snell) is at one end, and I am at the other. He writes his children's books, and I do my stories. We both try to be at our desks by 8:30 AM, and we work until 1:00 PM. This includes answering mail and filing. We have a secretary one day a week. Then when work is over, we have lunch and play a game of chess. We play seven days a week and have been doing so for over thirty years, and we are still hopeless at it, but love it to bits.

GR: With two writers in one household, do you and your husband give each other feedback or work separately?

MB: We always read each other our work in the afternoon. The rules are that we must be honest. No false praise. We allow the other ten minutes sulking time if we don't like what we heard, but then we have to accept or reject the criticism. No one is allowed to brood over it!

GR: What are you reading now? What are some of your favorite books and authors?

MB: I have just begun Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates, which seems terrific. My favourite authors are Ann Tyler, Harlan Coben, Lee Child, and David Baldacci.





message 10: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) You're doing great Jeane!! Glad you liked JS&MN, I loved that book absolutely. Even bought it!

You're gonna love Book Thief - have you read I Am the Messenger by Zusak? That is a terrific one.


message 11: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Laura wrote: "You're doing great Jeane!! Glad you liked JS&MN, I loved that book absolutely. Even bought it!

You're gonna love Book Thief - have you read I Am the Messenger by Zusak? That is a terrific one."



No I haven't Laura. I wasn't sure about The book thief but decided I want to read it. Finally took Angela's ashes from the library too.



message 12: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) I wasn't sure about it either - bit of a stretch for me, the WWII stuff - but I decided to do it, and glad I did. Bring Kleenex tho. But his writing style is tremendous. Messenger is so different, but great as well.

(I guess Zusak is my Nicholas Evans!)

:)


message 13: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Laura wrote: "I wasn't sure about it either - bit of a stretch for me, the WWII stuff - but I decided to do it, and glad I did. Bring Kleenex tho. But his writing style is tremendous. Messenger is so differen..."

normally I don't need kleenex. had need of them only when reading a Goodall book.
Yoour nicholas evans? Sure? :-)
I think I will use it for the spring challenge, if they have it at the library. Don't feel like buying it.


message 14: by Kandice (new)

Kandice Jeane-Do you meane Jane Goodall? Me too! Have you seen or read the book Koko's Kitten Francine Patterson? I cry every time I read it!!


message 15: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) I just read "Death Be Not Proud", and ohmigod I was sobbing all over the pages! It was bad. My face was so puffy and red I probably looked nightmarish!


message 16: by Kandice (new)

Kandice Sideburn boy wont care. I love when a book makes me cry buckets. It doesn't happen often, but when it does, its cathartic!


message 17: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) Nah, he doesn't care... He was sleeping like a baby and missed the whole thing. Good thing, because my face woulda probably been plastered all over YouTube if he'd have seen it. LOL


message 18: by Kandice (new)

Kandice Ha ha! It might have looked like that guy crying about "Leave Brittney Spears alone!" I bet you feel nice and cleaned out now;)


message 19: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) Haha! That guy is so funny!

Anyway... I don't know if I feel all cleaned out... I feel more like my heart was just ripped out of my chest, stomped on and then put back in upside down.

I think I WOULD feel cleaned out and refreshed if the book had a more uplifting ending. I mean, it was just so... depressing. I can see how it was supposed to be uplifting and hopeful, with a whole "have dignity in death" subtext, but I just couldn't help thinking about how I would react to being in that situation. The answer is: Badly. Very badly.

And so, I was sobbing like a newborn with onions stuffed up my nose. Not pretty.


message 20: by Kandice (new)

Kandice That's the second excellent visual I have gotten on here today, that wont be leaving my mind's eye for a while. Thankx Becky!!! ;)


message 21: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) LOL which one? My stomped on heart or onion baby?


message 22: by Kandice (new)

Kandice The baby! Gross! I'm imagining those brown shallot things, and they are just hanging there is snot and tears. Lovely image...


message 23: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) You're welcome! ;)


message 24: by Liz (new)

Liz I like your goals...I loved The Secret Life of Bees! I have the Mists of Avalon at home and need to get to it at some point.


message 25: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Kandice wrote: "Jeane-Do you meane Jane Goodall? Me too! Have you seen or read the book [b:Koko's Kitten|34687|Koko's Kitten (Reading Rainbow Book)|Francine Patterson|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1168......"

yes I mean Jane goodall. I only read one by now, the one on my shelve and it made me cry very much. It touched me emotionally very hard.


message 26: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Liz, I have the mist of avalon already five years on my wist list and still didn't read it.


message 27: by April (new)

April (booksandwine) | 954 comments Jeane wrote: "Liz, I have the mist of avalon already five years on my wist list and still didn't read it."

Mists of Avalon is excellent! If you love the Arthurian saga, you will enjoy this book, especially as woman, since it is told from a female point of view. This book was my first in-depth exposure to Arthurian mythology and I was hooked after.


message 28: by Liz (new)

Liz It's on my shelf, taking up space. I do like the Arthurain saga--I actually got a book which I believe is from Morgan Le Fay's point of view called Wise Woman's Telling. Also, April, if you haven't read T.H. White's The Once and Future King you really should!


message 29: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments I also like the arthurian saga,,,,I just never seem to get the book...


message 30: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 1. Sinn Fein A Hundred Turbulent Years (very interesting)
2.Suffer the Little Children A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery(good like all of her mysteries)
3.What Are You Like? A Novel (weird)
4. Crazy as Chocolate (okay, weird but liked it in the end)
5. Uninvited (okay, interesting to read a chinese style book)
6. Girl with a Pearl Earring(loved the book, very strong story)
7.Moby Dick(after 3-4 tries I managed after four years to finish it thanks to the winter challenge)
8. A Long Way Down9didn't like it. too 21century pushy london way talking style and weird story)
9. I'm Not Scared(good, surprising book.the beginning doesn't show much of what the story will become, which is surprising and very good)
10.Angels A Novel(thought this would be a light, empty story but it was great and lots of fun reading it)
11. April in Paris A Novel(nice, surprising and good story)
12. A Question of Blood(knew the stories only from tv but loved the first book to read about rebus as much as the tv series.not my last one)
13. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell(so happy that I read this huge book. The beginning was weird and didn't let you know much of how the story would go. Lots happened in the end and i just completly enjoyed reading this book)
14. Outlander
Liked the book, not crazy about it but enjoyed it. One certain thing which I thought would happen in the first book didn;t which made me wait till the end but I liked it.

15.The Red and the Green
My first Iris Murdoch book and enjoyed it so much. I got so much information about what happened around the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin and especially how people thought about it all then, how things were.... I even looked up street names that werementioned and got an idea where in dublin they were all living.

16. Two For The Dough
I always enjoy her books but there is also always the feeling that something I didn't enjoy. Maybe it is the combination of crime and humor that doesn't always work. I aodre crime stories and only start to get into some humor stories. But they are good. And sometimes before the big thing happens I sometimes feel like she is overdoing....but still fun and good to read. Thought this one was better than the first one.


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

Jeane you are reading some amazing books.


message 32: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Thanks. Which ones do you find interesting?


message 33: by Kandice (new)

Kandice I have The Mists of Avalon on my nightstand as next in line to read!


message 34: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments Kandice wrote: "I have The Mists of Avalon on my nightstand as next in line to read!"

it should be next in line as I have it as first book written on my wish list five years ago!!!!


message 35: by April (new)

April (booksandwine) | 954 comments Liz wrote: "It's on my shelf, taking up space. I do like the Arthurain saga--I actually got a book which I believe is from Morgan Le Fay's point of view called Wise Woman's Telling. Also, April, if you haven'..."


I LOVE the Once and Future King!! It's definately in my top 10 books.



message 36: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 17. Grave Sight

I thought I hadn't read well the back cover when taking the book and thought it wasn't a good start when it said that the main character founds dead people. Or it was going to be boring or very scary. I was so wrong. It was such a good book and never clear what was going to happen and who was who.

Harper is called to a little town for her job. She is hired by the mother of a dead boy because he is accused of killing his girlfriend and then commiting suicide. His mother doesn't want her son to be blamed for the dead of the girl so she hired Harper to find the girl, which she is sure is dead. It should have been a simple job but it all goes wrong for Harper....


message 37: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 18. Angela's Ashes - Frank McCourt

I waited for years to read this book thinking it would make me feel depressive....but it wasn't like that at all!


message 38: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 19. The book of lost books- stuart Kelly

It was great. History, books all in one.... and now I want to read all the lost, destroyed, unfinished, unstart books but I plan to read at least one book by each mentioned author. The book was really interesting.


message 39: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 20.Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

I enjoyed this one. I saw the movies already so not everything was a surprise but I had a good time reading it. It went also very fast.


message 40: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 21.The Welsh Girl

still busy with two other books but read aslo this lovely book for the spring challenge. very good.


message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

Did you like the Welsh Girl.


message 42: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments yes, it was nice. I liek reading stories that are set in the places I have been. I am still reading two other books and then my secret one!!:-)


message 43: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 22. A Traveller's Companion to Dublin

such an interesting book. You read about the history of Dublin through parts of diaries, letters, .... it was great!


message 44: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 23. The Red Book

This is a very beautiful book. It has small stories about three people and theri lvies come together in the end of the book but still through three stories.
I really liked the characters of the people, especially Francoise.


message 45: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 24. Plan B 2.0. - Lester R. Brown

Such an interesting book of which I wished there wouldn't be the reason to write it.
The updated version is 3.0. and should be, according to me, be read by everyone and especially politicians and owners of companies, builders of cars and so on. But actually by any single person of every age. Very very interesting and well written.


message 46: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 25. Watermelon - Marian Keyes

This book was soooo good and funny.
It is told by a different sister of this Irish family. The author wrote a book from the view of every sister in te family which is great.
This one starts all around the time when Claire is in hospital to get her first child and he husband tells her he is leaving her.
I read this book in like one day and was hyper because of it.


message 47: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments 26. The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective


Started interesting and a fast read but after a while it was just all the same.


message 48: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) You're coming along great, Jeane, blowing through the books like a reading tornado!


message 49: by Kandice (new)

Kandice Good job Jeane. You could do a re-read of the Loop with us:)It would still count.


message 50: by Jeane (new)

Jeane | 4891 comments I would love that Kandice! But don't want to read it out of any other copy than my beloved one at home and I am not really short of books even here! I seem to have a wardrobe in belgium, italy and wherever we live at the moment but the same is happening with books.


« previous 1
back to top