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Picture of the Day > December 2012

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message 1: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 869 comments
"WASHINGTON, DC.- Visitors to the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery will be able step into a heated tent in the adjacent Moongate Garden and be transported to a Chinese Buddhist cave, where murals will come alive with musicians, dancers and flying Bodhisattvas. “Pure Land: Inside the Mogao Grottoes at Dunhuang,” on view Dec. 1–Dec. 9, is an immersive 3-D experience of one of the world’s ancient art treasures and a technological application never before seen in the United States...The cave combines laser scanning and ultra-high-resolution photography to create an enhanced virtual tour with music and animation. Details faded beyond recognition in the actual cave appear in their original bright colors..."



More Information: http://artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec...
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message 2: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Sanctum, 1985
Martin Puryear
Wood, wire mesh, and tar
76 × 109 × 87 in. (193 × 276.9 × 221 cm)
Whitney Museum of Art


message 3: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 869 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Sanctum, 1985
Martin Puryear
Wood, wire mesh, and tar
76 × 109 × 87 in. (193 × 276.9 × 221 cm)
Whitney Museum of Art"


You're on a roll.


message 4: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Thanks for starting the December thread. That would've slipped by me...


message 5: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl It's been years since I've been to the Sackler Gallery. I'll have to stop in the next time I'm in D.C.


message 6: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 869 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Thanks for starting the December thread. That would've slipped by me..."

Actually I posted in November and fixed it.

So much for my reputation.... :)


message 7: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 869 comments
A man looks at "The Dream" 1940 (C, in color) by Henri Matisse on display in the exhibition "Matisse: In Search of True Painting" at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. This wall re-creates an exhibit in the Galerie Maeght in Paris from 1945 that included large framed photographs documenting the evolution of the painting. The Met exhibition, which opens to the public December 4, explores Matisse’s painting process by showcasing 49 vibrantly colored canvases that demonstrate the artist’s tendency to use his completed canvases as tools, repeating compositions in order to compare effects, gauge his progress, and, as he put it, “push further and deeper into true painting.” AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/index.asp[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org


message 8: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1262 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Sanctum, 1985
Martin Puryear
Wood, wire mesh, and tar
76 × 109 × 87 in. (193 × 276.9 × 221 cm)
Whitney Museum of Art"


Saw a fantastic exhibit of Puryear's work at the Mus of Contemp Art in LA some years ago.


message 9: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Trolley, New Orleans, 1955
Robert Frank (American, born Switzerland, 1924)
Gelatin silver print


message 10: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

In a Village Near Paris (Street in Paris, Pink Sky), 1909
Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956)
University of Iowa Museum of Art
39 3/4 x 32 in (101 x 81.3 cm)


message 11: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Sharks, Weiner Dogs, 2008
Hope Gangloff
Acrylic on canvas
54 x 81 Inches


message 12: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1262 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Sharks, Weiner Dogs, 2008
Hope Gangloff
Acrylic on canvas
54 x 81 Inches"


Oh, I like this one!


message 13: by Lobstergirl (last edited Dec 20, 2012 07:52PM) (new)

Lobstergirl

Three x Four x Three, 1984
Sol Lewitt (1928-2007)
Painted aluminum
14'1" x 14'1" x 14'1"
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis


message 14: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Minnesota, 1980
Joan Mitchell (1925-1992)
Oil on canvas
(four panels), 102 1/2 x 243 inches


message 15: by Ed (last edited Dec 07, 2012 10:04PM) (new)


message 16: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 869 comments

Know what this is?
(view spoiler)


message 17: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1262 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Minnesota, 1980
Joan Mitchell (1925-1992)
Oil on canvas
(four panels), 102 1/2 x 243 inches"


Love Joan Mitchell's work.


message 18: by Ed (last edited Dec 07, 2012 10:44PM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 869 comments Ruth wrote: "Lobstergirl wrote: "Minnesota, 1980
Joan Mitchell (1925-1992)
Oil on canvas
(four panels), 102 1/2 x 243 inches"

Love Joan Mitchell's work."


Joan Mitchell Lady Painter by Patricia Albers
Highly recommended.


message 19: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

The Entrance of the Masked Dancers, c. 1884
Hilaire Germain Edgar Degas (1834-1917)
Pastel on paper
49 x 64.7 cm
Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA


message 20: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 5304 comments Ed wrote: "

Know what this is?

Portrait of Albert Einstein (1950) by Josef Scharl (1896-1954). Ink on paper. Exhibitor: Sigrid Freundorfer Fine Art.

More Information: http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_..."




Got that one! It's a great sketch, I like it!


message 21: by Dvora (new)

Dvora Looks like Albert Einstein.
Ed wrote: "

Know what this is?

Portrait of Albert Einstein (1950) by Josef Scharl (1896-1954). Ink on paper. Exhibitor: Sigrid Freundorfer Fine Art.

More Information: http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_..."



message 22: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Le Moulin, 1881-82
Vincent van Gogh
Gouache and watercolor over paper laid down on board
h: 14.9 x w: 22 in


message 23: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl [image error]

Windows, 2005
Christopher Gallego
Oil on canvas
48 x 54 in.
Private Collection


message 24: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1262 comments Ooh, nice!


message 25: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Self-Portrait, 1921
Konstantin Somov (Russian, 1869-1939)
pencil on paper


message 26: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Cheburaska, 2008
Oleg Dou (Russian, b.1983)
C-Print photograph


message 27: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Maine Cow, 2007
Alex Katz (American, b.1927)
Painted aluminum on bronze base
h: 49 x w: 72.5 x d: 10.2 in


message 28: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 5304 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Cheburaska, 2008
Oleg Dou (Russian, b.1983)
C-Print photograph"


I don't understand the talent in this one. Can anyone enlighten me?


message 29: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1262 comments What do you mean by "talent?" Technical skill?


message 30: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl I know nothing about photography so I can't enlighten you. I picked it because it was an arresting image. If you do an image search on "Oleg Dou" (who I'd never heard of before I saw that particular image), you'll see that his thing is head-on portraits, manipulated in strange ways.


message 31: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 5304 comments I'm going to sound ignorant and you have every right to believe I am, but how hard is it to put a hat on a baby and take a picture of it? How does it make you feel?


message 32: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1262 comments You ave to admit that is no ordinary hat-on-baby picture. There's something oddly creepy about it. Unsettling.


message 33: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 869 comments Ruth wrote: "You ave to admit that is no ordinary hat-on-baby picture. There's something oddly creepy about it. Unsettling."

Creepiness is definitely an aesthetic category. Else how would Juxtapoz stay in business? ;)


message 34: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 5304 comments Ruth wrote: "You ave to admit that is no ordinary hat-on-baby picture. There's something oddly creepy about it. Unsettling."

You're right, Ruth. It is creepy. The eyes? I don't know. If they were going for that effect, they chose the right baby, that's for sure!


message 35: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 869 comments Heather wrote: "I'm going to sound ignorant and you have every right to believe I am, but how hard is it to put a hat on a baby and take a picture of it? How does it make you feel?"

That's actually a great question, but it's not all that easy to answer.
Instead of answering (personally, for me, it's a case of "it depends") I'll just throw out some more questions for people to think about. In fact that's the great thing about art, it's always open ended.

That's always a really interesting question in aesthetics: how difficult is an art object to do, physically? I think there's three aspects to that. 1. the manual skill or physical effort needed, 2. the insight, design, or concept, and 3. the time, experience and effort involved in preparation. It's an issue of personal taste how you combine the three.

For example, painting and photography differ radically in the combination of the three. A painter may choose slice of life, or banal subject matter, and through execution and skill make it interesting. A good photographer may spend an enormous amount of time planning or setting up a shot, which is the work of the moment to "execute"--although the post production work in Photoshop or the darkroom may involve some work too. And what of all the preparatory or rejected work that represents an artist's investment in developing skill or sensibility?

And what about skill combined with rapid and perfect execution and absolutely minimal expression, like a Japanese Zen painter?


Or when is a high concept work so arresting or intriguing that it can carry weight even though there was little physical work involved?

What about collaboration? Bernini was a highly skilled sculptor, but delegated specific work to specialists (like the fine detail in Apollo and Daphne). Clearly I can't imagine anyone else coming up with the design. He probably could have carved and polished all the leaves himself, but he didn't do so.


message 36: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl If art could speak, perhaps like Walt Whitman it would say:

Do I contradict myself?
Very well, then, I contradict myself;
(I am large—I contain multitudes.)



message 37: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Le bonheur de l’aveuglement, ("The happiness of blindness") c. 1947
Francis Picabia (French, 1879–1953)
Oil on panel
h: 59.8 x w: 37.9 in


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