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Rory Book Discussions > The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

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message 1: by Lee-Anne (new)

Lee-Anne I am thrilled to see that the upcoming book for December is Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises. I haven't read this book for many years, but recall my teeneaged self enjoying it. I look forward to the upcoming discussion!


message 2: by Chelsea (new)

Chelsea (coutlaw) I've read For Whom the Bell Tolls, but never The Sun Also Rises. The last time I read Hemingway was in college, and I'm looking forward to getting acquainted again with Ernest on my (and his) own terms!


message 3: by Lee-Anne (new)

Lee-Anne I'm looking forward to hearing what you think of it, Chelsea!


Hannah (PSIloveThatBook) (hannahcassie) Oh wow, really looking forward to get my hands on this one!


message 5: by Cristy (new)

Cristy Rey (cristyrey) This is his best...maybe second best...check out "A Moveable Feast" afterward. It's a memoir of his time while WRITING Sun Also Rises. So amazing. As a pair, they're just wonderful.


message 6: by Neens (new)

Neens Bea (neens_bea) | 9 comments I'm really looking forward to reading this - my only previous experience of Hemingway is The Snows of Kilimanjaro: Short Story, which I had to read for my English degree 12 years ago.


message 7: by Michelle, the leader of literature (new)

Michelle (mnishi) | 34 comments Mod
I tried reading this a few years ago and didn't get very far. It seemed to me, all the book was about was drinking at this bar, then this bar, then this other bar, having boring conversations (kind of like On the Road). I'm going to give it another shot, but my expectations are not very high.


message 8: by Chelsea (new)

Chelsea (coutlaw) I would TOTALLY go on a bar crawl with Hemingway, so maybe Sun Also Rises is going to be even more awesome than I'm anticipating. :)


message 9: by Marie-pier (last edited Nov 29, 2012 05:19AM) (new)

Marie-pier | 51 comments Anybody can tell me how similar this book might be to 'The Old Men and The Sea'?

It is my first month joining this club, and I am so sad I missed Autobiography of a face :(

Either way, I'll give a chance to yet another Alcoholic Suicidal American writer a chance to impress me.
---Editing my post after reading more about Hemingway-
I actually might be enjoying this book, reading about the lost generation and how a young cohort of regular people survived the first world war, but most important how they absorbed the trauma of this first of a king conflict.


message 10: by Christoph (new)

Christoph | 6 comments I´ve read "A Moveable Feast" a while ago and was quite disappointed by it. Now I´m on page 20 of "The Sun Also Rises" and I fear I won´t like this one either.


message 11: by Cuppiesaur (new)

Cuppiesaur Christoph wrote: "I´ve read "A Moveable Feast" a while ago and was quite disappointed by it. Now I´m on page 20 of "The Sun Also Rises" and I fear I won´t like this one either."

Christoph, I'm on page 60 of "The sun Also Rises" and I'm not enjoying much. I don't think the plot have a purpose at all. It will might have some soft romance but I don't think will be a very well understanding and profund story about how end up those who survive the first war (which was what I expected from this book).


message 12: by Marie-pier (new)

Marie-pier | 51 comments Ana wrote: "Christoph wrote: "I´ve read "A Moveable Feast" a while ago and was quite disappointed by it. Now I´m on page 20 of "The Sun Also Rises" and I fear I won´t like this one either."

Christoph, I'm on ..."


I second that


message 13: by Cuppiesaur (new)

Cuppiesaur Michelle wrote: "I tried reading this a few years ago and didn't get very far. It seemed to me, all the book was about was drinking at this bar, then this bar, then this other bar, having boring conversations (kin..."

Michelle, that is exactly what this book is about!
They drink in this bar, then go to another just to drink some more, then cross the city to eat at some place and go home to drink some more. The other day, same thing. -___-


message 14: by Cuppiesaur (new)

Cuppiesaur My thoughts about this book so far
I'm currently on chapter 10.

The book is actually very fluid, very dynamic. Even if it is the same thing over and over, things are always happening (even if they aren't meaningful).

Hemingway's style is suppose to be meaningless. He is against all the sentimentalism and psychological aspects of the literature.
So yeah, his plot has no propose at all!
He is in favor of letting his characters being themselves - therefore, being independent of their creator.
So again,yeah,his characters don't do anything at all all plot!

I don't like the way Hemingway make the development of his book, but his writing is ok. So far, it is not a bad reading, it's just not close to be a good one either.


message 15: by Emilie (new)

Emilie (Ecatherine) | 1 comments Chelsea wrote: "I would TOTALLY go on a bar crawl with Hemingway, so maybe Sun Also Rises is going to be even more awesome than I'm anticipating. :)" Hahahahaha love this :)


message 16: by Marie-pier (new)

Marie-pier | 51 comments Not the most interesting book, however you stubmle across some passage like this one:

'We went down the stairs to the cafe on the ground
floor. I had discovered that was the best way to get rid of friends. Once you had a drink all you had to say was: "Well, I've got to get back and get off some cables," and it was done. It is very important to discover graceful exits like that in the newspaper business, where it is such an important part of the ethics that you should never seem to be working.'

That makes me wanna read more


message 17: by Marie-pier (new)

Marie-pier | 51 comments Ana wrote: "Christoph wrote: "I´ve read "A Moveable Feast" a while ago and was quite disappointed by it. Now I´m on page 20 of "The Sun Also Rises" and I fear I won´t like this one either."

Christoph, I'm on ..."


You just put into word exactly what I'm thinking (now being at chapter X)


message 18: by Nadja (new)

Nadja Hertel Hi, I'm new to this group, and I joined it because The Sun Also Rises will be one of the books in my oral exam in February (I'm an ESL major in Germany). I just started reading it, and it's a little slow, but if it's anything like The Old Man and the Sea (which is unfortunately the only Hemingway novel I read so far), it will develop and the end's going to be mind-blowing. He'll tie up all lose ends, and the "random" details will make sense.

By the way, whoever wrote the comment about how The Sun Also Rises is sort of like going on a bar crawl with Hemingway, I feel exactly the same way!! I heard that it's a pretty accurate description of Paris in the 1920s, and that some of the places still exist, but I'm not sure. Did you watch the Woody Allen movie "Midnight in Paris"? It's a little cheesy, but I would die to go back in time like Jil, have drinks with Hemingway and Fitzgerald, and listen to Cole Porter play piano. You might want to check it out.


message 19: by Nadja (new)

Nadja Hertel Oh, and if anyone is interested, here are excerpts of Dorothy Parker's book review of The Sun Also Rises and his early short stories (published in the New Yorker in 1927):
http://davidabramsbooks.blogspot.de/2...


message 20: by Marie-pier (new)

Marie-pier | 51 comments Nadja wrote: "Hi, I'm new to this group, and I joined it because The Sun Also Rises will be one of the books in my oral exam in February (I'm an ESL major in Germany). I just started reading it, and it's a littl..."

I will be watching this movie TONIGHT,I never really took the time to watch Woody Allen's movie (except for Annie Hall and Victoria Christina Barcelona).

At the beginning of the month, I could say that I was not a Hemingway fan, but now that I'm almost done with this book, I can see why people consider him to be an important litterature figure.


**me reading Hemingway**

Bored.....Bored......HOLY SHIT LET ME HIGHLIGHT THIS...
Bored.

A lot of nothing and then BAM! a paragrah that I just want to commit to memory so that I can recitate it at a cocktail party.


message 21: by Melissa (new)

Melissa | 6 comments Nice! Our book group read The Paris Wife not that long ago and I've been wanting to read some Hemingway ever since. I am intrigued.I don't know if I really like it yet, but some of it is so very vivid.


message 22: by Rebecca, the princess of prose (new)

Rebecca Curtis | 70 comments Mod
I am finally done with classes for the semester so I have time to tackle this book! I am so excited to start reading! When will we have the book lists for 2013?


message 23: by Marie-pier (new)

Marie-pier | 51 comments What do you guys think about Cohn?


message 24: by Alison (new)

Alison | 17 comments I just joined good reads, saw this group, and joined because A)I love the Gilmore Girls, and B)I love reading great books. I love that you guys read half classics, half moderns. Book clubs sometimes seem to ignore the classics, and they should not be ignored! I can't wait to read more classics this year. Crime and Punishment has been on my list. Can't wait to see the list for 2013!


message 25: by Nadja (new)

Nadja Hertel Marie-Pier: I haven't finished the book yet, but so far I think that Cohn is the oddest character in the entire book. I feel so sorry for him because his "friends" take out their own insecurities on him, but at the same time he's so needy, socially awkward, and intellectually slow at times that it's almost inevitable for him to become their target. There were several passages when I wished he would just find himself new friends (especially after Michael's outburst in chapter 14).

What do you think about Brett?


message 26: by Ma. Lalaine (new)

Ma. Lalaine (goodreadscomfirelightLalaine) | 10 comments Nadja wrote: "Hi, I'm new to this group, and I joined it because The Sun Also Rises will be one of the books in my oral exam in February (I'm an ESL major in Germany). I just started reading it, and it's a littl..."

The places still exist. I'm checking it on Google Earth while reading. The story lacks melodrama but still engages me because my theory Hemingway is genuinely telling snippets of his life experience. That's the catch. From what I know I read two novels of him but only remembers The Old Man and the Sea and my Sociology professor comment that he is a chauvinist.


message 27: by Ma. Lalaine (new)

Ma. Lalaine (goodreadscomfirelightLalaine) | 10 comments Marie-pier wrote: "What do you guys think about Cohn?"

Robert Cohn remains insecure and unsure of himself. That is my impression when I'm on Chapter 10. Thus, not my type. (Just saying, who agrees with me?)


message 28: by Ma. Lalaine (new)

Ma. Lalaine (goodreadscomfirelightLalaine) | 10 comments "You gave up something and got something else. Or you worked for something. You paid some way for everything that was any good. I paid my way into enough things that I liked, so that I had a good time. Either you paid by learning about them, or by experience, or by taking chances, or by money. Enjoying living was learning to get your money’s worth and knowing when you had it. You could get your money’s worth. The world was a good place to buy in. " I quoted from Chapter 14. ;)


message 29: by Marie-pier (new)

Marie-pier | 51 comments This passage was highlighted in my book as well :-)

I would agree with you all about Cohn, I also had the impression that he actually like being a victim. I don't have my book handy to quote you the chapters, but in multiple passages, it's actually like he like being treated that way, because part of having love story with a lady. Being obsessed with Hudson, I would think he is a romantic confused boy who looks like a puppy (except when he punches grown man in the face). I never read Hudson (the author that Cohn takes the books of as a guide for living his life. There s not a lot about him online except a line really interesting that I can't paste cause I'm on my iPad goddammit.


message 30: by Alissa (new)

Alissa | 6 comments I wasn't really very interested in the book either so I tried looking up the actual meaning of it all. Just as multiple people have been saying on here that there seems to be no meaning, apparently that is the point! Everyone in the book is disheartened and their life has no further meaning....they just keep doing what they do and don't seem to look beyond it. I find this a little disappointing because I enjoy more uplifting books. I also have found myself constantly comparing it to Midnight in Paris...the repetition, angst and dissatisfaction is very similar.


message 31: by Ma. Lalaine (new)

Ma. Lalaine (goodreadscomfirelightLalaine) | 10 comments Nadja wrote: "Marie-Pier: I haven't finished the book yet, but so far I think that Cohn is the oddest character in the entire book. I feel so sorry for him because his "friends" take out their own insecurities o..."

I think Brett is emotional and foolish to get involved with Pedro. But she is also a lucky lady because she can get whoever guy she wants.


message 32: by Steph (new)

Steph Mulrine (smulrine) | 6 comments I found this book really difficult to warm to. I think it is probably meant to be a challenge for the reader and that might be why there have been so many mixed opinions. I definitely wasn't really finding anything enjoyable or particularly interesting about it for the first half at least. But I felt the 'dramatic' events were much more on a par with real life events. Often there aren't great big ramifications and consequences and individuals carry on as only their habits dictate. In the end I think that was what made me warm to it.

But, bloody hell, did I want to take out that Cohn! Stop wallowing!


message 33: by Nadja (last edited Jan 04, 2013 11:02AM) (new)

Nadja Hertel I think that book perfectly captures the disillusionment of the expatriates in Paris (or at least the way I imagine it). They are restless and wander aimlessly from bar to bar, or on a bigger scale, from city to city, and although they know that the travel won't cure their unhappiness, they keep wandering. Also, I didn't feel like the book had that typical development, with rising tension and climax etc., which was kind of like life.

But, oh dear, Cohn turned into a stalker and a rowdy in the end... However, Jake was just as obsessed with Brett as every other man in the book, except that, as opposed to Cohn, he knew how to act in public. He watched her go from man to man, and then she'd come back to him and have the audacity to ask him if he loved her! And he'd be like, yes, dear! Of course I'll help you find that bullfighter boy, dear! And when she left Romero, Jake was there for her again, always putting himself second. I wished he shot her to the moon in the end.


message 34: by Marie-pier (new)

Marie-pier | 51 comments Ma. Lalaine wrote: "Nadja wrote: "Marie-Pier: I haven't finished the book yet, but so far I think that Cohn is the oddest character in the entire book. I feel so sorry for him because his "friends" take out their own ..."

Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to make her happy. I feel like she is one of numerous women that searches happiness through another men's attention, and once she got it she suddenly feels unfulfilled. When she feels unfulfilled, she needs to find another men, and feel like a "bitch" for doing so. (as self-proclaimed in the end).

This book talking about the lost generation, i guess you can see the different way two genders may cope about surviving WWII (with a beginning of the 1900's vision). Mens are trying to get dizzy to forget, and women are trying to fill the whole with other people.


message 35: by Anne (new)

Anne | 3 comments Marie-pier wrote: "Anybody can tell me how similar this book might be to 'The Old Men and The Sea'?

It is my first month joining this club, and I am so sad I missed Autobiography of a face :(

Either way, I'll give..."


Hi Marie-pier, honestly, it is nothing like The old man and the sea. I just loved The old man and the sea, it was poetic and the character was both cynical and philosophically aware. I didn't like The sun also rises, I found it caricatural: intellectuals not finding a sense in their lives and doing nothing all day but drinking and insulting one another. I liked one scene: when the boys are fishing (I'm sorry, I read the book a long time ago and I don't remember the names of the characters). I agree with how Rory called the author while talking with Jess in A tisket-a tasket: "the painful Hemingway".


message 36: by Anne (new)

Anne | 3 comments Cristy wrote: "This is his best...maybe second best...check out "A Moveable Feast" afterward. It's a memoir of his time while WRITING Sun Also Rises. So amazing. As a pair, they're just wonderful."

Cristy, I'm going to do that! This is a great advise, maybe I'll understand better the intention Hemingway had when he wrote The sun also rises.
By the way, I am so glad I found this group, I look forward to talk with you all about amazing books!


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