History Buffs United discussion

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message 1: by Hazel (new)

Hazel West | 816 comments Mod
I thought I would add a topic where everyone can propose topic suggestions for the group. I was kind of curious to see if anyone wants to set up book topics for favorite authors or series so we can discuss those. Let me know who some of your favorite HF authors are, or just set up a new topic for yourself. Also if anyone wants to start a thread for a specific time period that would be cool too, and it might help the writers here who are looking for info. Even if you're not a writer, if you know a lot about a certain subject, let us know, because it might be helpful!


message 2: by Sandra (new)

Sandra Saidak (sandywriter) | 137 comments I was just about to start a new group (something I've never attempted before) because I really like fiction set in ancient and prehistoric times--and I can't find a group for that!

Then I saw this topic, and thought I might as well ask if anyone would like to discuss the books of Jean Auel or Mary Mackey or Sam Barone. Or maybe prehistoric fiction in general.

If not, maybe someone knows of an existing group that I missed (there's a LOT of groups to navigate, and I don't always put in the most locial search words), and will let me know.

Thanks, all!


message 3: by Hazel (last edited Nov 17, 2012 07:09PM) (new)

Hazel West | 816 comments Mod
Prehistorical isn't really my thing, so I haven't heard of any groups, but if you want to start a topic here, and see where it goes, feel free to do so! I'm setting up a new section for "Books and Authors Discussions" so you can put it under there.


message 4: by Evan (new)

Evan Filby | 5 comments Although the description of this Group is very clear -- being focused on Historical Fiction -- the title is a bit misleading. I am working on a historical novel, but my publications are historical nonfiction (many articles and two books). In general, the term "History Buff" encompasses everyone who is interested in history. In fact, I would venture to say there are many history buffs (writers, genealogist "spin-offs", re-enactors, etc.) who follow historical nonfiction, but do not read historical fiction.

Actually, I know a few buffs who absolutely refuse to read novels set in a historical era they are particularly steeped in (think American Civil War, the War of the Roses, etc). They know too much, so even the slightest inaccuracies ruin the story for them. (I am not in this hard-over group, BTW, but major problems will turn me away from a novel.)

My suggestion(s): Open the group discussions to enjoyable or especially informative historical nonfiction, or tweak the title to clarify the preference for HF.


message 5: by Hazel (new)

Hazel West | 816 comments Mod
Well, i'm not changing the title, if people want to know what the group is for, they can read the description. If you would like to start a thread for nonfiction, go ahead. I've not had any complaints on the title or the discussions so far, and, personally, I would like to keep catering to HF writers and readers who might enjoy something a little different. As a writer myself, it is very hard to keep your HF books from melding into the pot and we are continuously looking for ways to make our books stand out while still being as accurate as possible, even if we can't always find the information we need for every little part. Thus I encourage going off the beaten path of history as long as authors are still respectable to the real people they write about. There are plenty of groups on here for history in general, but I made this one specific for lovers of historical fiction.


message 6: by Bryn (last edited Nov 29, 2012 12:13PM) (new)

Bryn Hammond (BrynHammond) | 275 comments Sandy wrote: " I really like fiction set in ancient and prehistoric times--and I can't find a group for that!"

http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/1...

Sandy, can't hurt to try this group, Ancient World. It's very quiet - that's why we need you - and largely nonfic but fic gets discussed. 'Ancient' to them means pre-Christian, anywhere. I like the anywhere part, that they do live up to. Can we get that one more active?


message 7: by David (last edited Nov 29, 2012 01:14PM) (new)

David Krae (DavidKrae) Sandy wrote: "I was just about to start a new group (something I've never attempted before) because I really like fiction set in ancient and prehistoric times--and I can't find a group for that!

Then I saw this..."


Hey Sandy, There's a really solid group called 'Ancient and Medieval Historical Fiction' you might also enjoy if you haven't already found it.

You can find it here:
http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/5...

Bryn -- thanks for the link to Ancient World -- gonna go check it out. :) Cheers!


Hazel -- the group title's just fine. It's good to have a group of 'History Buffs' blending historical fiction with some historical discussion in terms of personal interest rather than the sometimes dryly academic. :)


message 8: by Hazel (new)

Hazel West | 816 comments Mod
That was my goal with it, David. I was the kind of person writing notes in my high school history text books because they left out all the good parts ;)


message 9: by Sandra (new)

Sandra Saidak (sandywriter) | 137 comments Thanks Bryn! The threads here are nice and short, which means I can get up to speed quickly. It looks like it's mostly for non-fiction, but I'll certainly give it a try.

Thanks David! This group looks great, but I'll have to wait until I have time to wade, er, uh, swim through it. There looks like a lot of good stuff there.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Do writers need emotional experiences to create the stories they share? Sometimes I get emotional about things (trials from the past) and I can express these feelings thru playing an instrument. Sometimes thru singing but most easily while on piano. Authors have such an opportunity to communicate the emotions of others. Just wondering what motivates you to create your stories, and what were people like Shakespeare motivated by?


message 11: by Hazel (new)

Hazel West | 816 comments Mod
Intojoy wrote: "Do writers need emotional experiences to create the stories they share? Sometimes I get emotional about things (trials from the past) and I can express these feelings thru playing an instrument. So..."

People with lots of emotions write a lot. I know I pour my emotions into my books, even if my characters are expieriencing something that I never have myself. If I put myself into their shoes, I can feel all their pain and happiness. Writing is a great outlet for emotions, and much like playing music or singing (I like to do that too to let out pent up emotions). I think classic authors like Shakespeare were very much motivated by the same things writers are today. I think some of his plays and definitely his poetry were outlets for his emotions. Other plays (Like Romeo and Juliet which I always personally felt he wrote to show how stupid people can be) might try to prove a point.

So, no, I don't think you need emotional experience to write about things. In one of my books I deal with a character who has post traumatic stress disorder, and I have personally never been through that or even known anyone who has. If your writing has no emotion, or the author has no emotion, I believe that is what is classed as the genre 'literary' (Please excuse my flaming of the literary genre. I am personally against it in every sense of the word.)


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

Thank you Hazel. Why don't you list the books you've written here? I'd like to check them out.
Aloha,
Mike


message 13: by Hazel (new)

Hazel West | 816 comments Mod
You can find them on my profile.


message 14: by Steven (new)

Steven Malone | 225 comments Intojoy wrote: "Do writers need emotional experiences to create the stories they share? Sometimes I get emotional about things (trials from the past) and I can express these feelings thru playing an instrument. So..."

I don't see how authors can separate their emotions from their work. They can't if they want to write beleivable characters - and not if they want to benefit from(and enjoy) their art.

As I look around Goodreads I find it easy to see authors that work out their emotions (and their plight and past)in their art. I also find authors that create empathy for their characters in their readers through their own empathy for those characters. Both those things help me attain my 'suspension of disbelief'making for a story that is real for me.

I could wish we knew more about Shakespeare and his life. The range of emotion he infused in so many different characters astonishes me. How do you think he could do that so well without direct experience with those same emotions?


message 15: by Steven (new)

Steven Malone | 225 comments Sandy wrote: "I was just about to start a new group (something I've never attempted before) because I really like fiction set in ancient and prehistoric times--and I can't find a group for that!

Then I saw this..."


Hi Sandy,

I think that is a great idea. I'd participate in that thread. My interests may be on the newer end of that timeline - Greece, Rome, and Dark Age Briton. And, like Hazel I'd be more interested in the fiction of those times. The very dearth of information stimulates both my curiosity and creativity.


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

Thx Steven,
I've never read any Shakespeare. I read my first novel not out of choice but because I wanted to find some common ground with a client of mine. She was a Jew, and I am involved with Jewish missions. As a believer in Christ I'm fully aware of the strategy that the crusades accomplished for the devil in creating an abhorrence for crosses and other Christian associations in the Jewish mind. Anyway I read the 600 pager in two nights so that I could broaden the conversation with her about a Jewish Messiah. This never took place. However since reading that book, I've read at least a hundred historical fictions. I love them!
I guess I'm interested in authors because there aren't as many of you compared with the number of musicians or actors etc. and im fascinated. Thanks so much for the comments.

I'd like to recommend an area of writing in the same time you've mentioned, 4-8th centuries. What ever happened to the Jewish believers in the Messianic claims of Yeshua (Jesus)?
They would have had to endure vehement theological spite by Catholics as well as disgust from their Jewish brethren.
One story as a point of reference was when someone Ben somebody (forgot his name, but he's nicknamed "one eye") claimed to be the messiah. At this point Messianic Jews who were willing to fight side by side with Jewish unbelievers, abandoned their brethren due to their faithfulness to Yeshua. After this event, Jewish believers no longer were accepted as a sect of Judaism (they never were that doctrinally). As Paul mentions in his letter to Rome, there always would be a remnant of Jews who believes in Yeshua. What happens to them during those centuries?
By the way it was not until this generation that the church has seen this large number of Jews coming to faith in Jesus since the first century.


message 17: by Steven (last edited Dec 01, 2012 04:10PM) (new)

Steven Malone | 225 comments Ohh, it's been too long. But if memory serves but it seems to me that these people were pushed away by early Christian converts (mostly from 'Hellenistic' and the socalled 'mystery' cults like Mithraists etc - pardon my spelling) - that began to abandon many orthodox Jewish tenents. And, I think they (the Messianic Jews) strongly wanted the new Christianity to remember that Yeshua was Jewish after all. So strongly that they (the Messianic Jews)became as off putting as were the Pauline zealots. I can only presume that they either finally were absorbed by Christianity or reabsorbed by the Jewish community. There is history of all this much more complete than I can be but I can't draw the memory of it in a way to steer you to it.

Remember the Essenes, the splinter groups of the Gnostics, so many groups and cults whose history and end became lost in the mist.

As an aside, doesn't 'Ben' mean 'son of'. Like in Uris' book Exodus the character Ari ben Canaan - Ari, son of, Canaan. Maybe His book 'The Tel' (again with the spelling) may talk of Messianic Jews. I forget. It's a great read if you have the time. Check it out.


message 18: by Steven (new)

Steven Malone | 225 comments Addendum:

Josephus (The Jewish Wars) a contempory of the Mesada event may talk of Messianic Jews is his works.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Excellent


message 20: by Sandra (new)

Sandra Saidak (sandywriter) | 137 comments Posted by Steven:

Hi Sandy,

I think that is a great idea. I'd participate in that thread. My interests may be on the newer end of that timeline - Greece, Rome, and Dark Age Briton. And, like Hazel I'd be more interested in the fiction of those times. The very dearth of information stimulates both my curiosity and creativity.

Thanks, Steven! I had just decided to go ahead and start the group, but knowing there will be someone joining makes it easier.

Since you're interested, maybe you can help me with a name. I was thinking of: "Ancient Historical Fiction--From the Stone Age to the Rise of Empires"

What do you think? If you (or anyone who wants to weigh in) has a better title, please let me know. I'll try to set it up tomorrow.


message 21: by Hazel (new)

Hazel West | 816 comments Mod
Good to know, Sandy! If you need any help, just let me know. I might like to join in eventually, though I'm more for the Roman era, or the Celtic and all, but I always like to learn new things =)


message 22: by Steven (new)

Steven Malone | 225 comments Sandra wrote: "Posted by Steven:

Hi Sandy,

I think that is a great idea. I'd participate in that thread. My interests may be on the newer end of that timeline - Greece, Rome, and Dark Age Briton. And, like Haze..."


I like it.


message 23: by Sandra (new)

Sandra Saidak (sandywriter) | 137 comments I just started a new group Ancient Historical Fiction:

http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/8...

It's probably fairly obvious that I've never done this before. Suggestions welcomed.


Now all I need is a source of income which will let me quit my job and spend all my time writing and having great discussions here on Goodreads!


message 24: by C.P. (new)

C.P. Lesley (cplesley) | 339 comments Yeah, me, too. Good luck wid dat. :)


message 25: by Hazel (new)

Hazel West | 816 comments Mod
Haha ;) I joined your group, Sandy! Looking forward to starting up some discussions when I get the chance. right now, I've got lots of work to finish this weekend so I should really get offline ;)


message 26: by Steven (new)

Steven Malone | 225 comments Sandra wrote: "I just started a new group Ancient Historical Fiction:

http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/8...

It's probably fairly obvious that I've never done this before. Suggest..."


Hey Sandra,

I'm joining your new group right after posting this. I just wanted to say 'me too' on the income source. As you have heard and probably said: my one piece of advice to those who what to be writers is to keep your day job.


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