NaNoWriMo Next Steps--Writing, Publishing and Book Marketing discussion

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Who do you allow to read your novel drafts?

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message 1: by Gail (new)

Gail Martin (GailZMartin) | 47 comments Mod
Who is your beta reader--the person who reads your manuscript and helps you refine your story? What's your process?


message 2: by Lucinda (new)

Lucinda | 20 comments Currently no one but i have to say that whilst i am writing it helps to read aloud parts of the narrative and detailed action scenes, so i can put myself in the place of the reader and gain another perspective. I have found that making a battle scene intense and realistic can be challenging, but also exciting too when you loose yourself in the moment.


message 3: by Betty (new)

Betty Cross (BettyCross) | 24 comments I work with a professional editor, Christina James Chase. I have to pay her, but I can take it off my income tax as a business deduction the next year, so it's all good. After I get feedback from her, and only then, do I prepare the draft that I feel comfortable submitting to a publisher.


message 4: by Gail (new)

Gail Martin (GailZMartin) | 47 comments Mod
I'm fortunate enough to have a husband who is a great editor, and I also have a friend who reads the almost-finished draft as a beta reader. But I'm intrigued by the forewards to books I've read where people have a half a dozen beta readers. I'm interested to see how other people do it!


message 5: by Betty (new)

Betty Cross (BettyCross) | 24 comments I run some of my chapters by a writers' critique group I meet with twice a month (including tomorrow night). I can't do a whole novel that way. They'd have no time for anything else. But, I've found it's a great way to find out if your opening chapter really starts the book off on the right foot.


message 6: by Gail (new)

Gail Martin (GailZMartin) | 47 comments Mod
I think the biggest part is finding people you trust who "get" the genre so that they're helping you make your book, chapter or opening few pages as good as possible.


message 7: by Betty (new)

Betty Cross (BettyCross) | 24 comments Gail wrote: "I think the biggest part is finding people you trust who "get" the genre so that they're helping you make your book, chapter or opening few pages as good as possible."
That's certainly true, Gail. I was in a critique group once where 3 of about 8 or 9 members fundamentally didn't "get" the fantasy genre. One of them complained my characters didn't have "regular names." Another couldn't conceive of the idea of a fantasy world with apparently human-like actors. He wanted to know "how they got there." One told me to redo it as a sci-fi novel. Now THAT he could understand. The critique group I'm in now "gets" all the genres I work in.


message 8: by Gail (new)

Gail Martin (GailZMartin) | 47 comments Mod
Betty wrote: "Gail wrote: "I think the biggest part is finding people you trust who "get" the genre so that they're helping you make your book, chapter or opening few pages as good as possible."
That's certainly..."


I'm glad you transcended that awful experience. I had a bad "writing group" experience when I was first starting out, and it made my shy away from critique groups altogether, which probably meant that I missed out on some good ones. But as you say, you need to find a group that "gets" the genre and also one where people aren't jealous when someone writes something that is very good. And for those who have found helpful groups, good for you!


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