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Side Reads > David Copperfield chapters 1-8

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message 1: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer  | 207 comments Reading schedule for this part is November 1st through November 7th.


message 2: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer  | 207 comments Well I have cheated. I couldn't help myself and I read the first couple chapters of this book tonight. I won't place any spoilers in here yet, as the side read hasn't officially started, but I already adore the main character of this book and I personally enjoy Dickens' prose style. So glad that people are participating in this read with me.


message 3: by Alana (new)

Alana (alanasbooks) | 722 comments I should be ready for it in a couple of days, finishing A Storm of Swords first.


message 4: by Catherine (new)

Catherine (catjackson) I need to finish Hard Times by Dickens first and then I'll get to Copperfield.


message 5: by Catherine (new)

Catherine (yarnmama10) This is one of my all time favorite Dickens novels and I am looking forward to the discussions. :-)


message 6: by Baz (new)

Baz (bazfiction) | 5 comments I bought David Copperfield a couple of months ago and it's on my list to read, and it would be great to have reading companions, so I'll get cracking on it as soon as I finish Cold Comfort Farm.


message 7: by Martha (new)

Martha Jennifer wrote: "Well I have cheated. I couldn't help myself and I read the first couple chapters of this book tonight. I won't place any spoilers in here yet, as the side read hasn't officially started, but I alre..."

Yes, yes! I've only read to page 20, but I agree, it is so beautiful, so relaxing to read, I love it. I read this when I was about 14, but I can't remember much except the characters names, it seems brand new to me.


message 8: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Degraaf (ldegraaf) | 20 comments This book has been on my Kindle for awhile. From everything that I have read this book is amazing. I am really looking forward to these discussions.


message 9: by Bhawya (last edited Nov 02, 2012 01:40AM) (new)

Bhawya | 12 comments my fav dickens book...i read it as an eleven year old...and absolutely loved it.....classics such as these have a warm feel good factor...they light up your day.....so i am gonna read this old friend again...


message 10: by Martha (new)

Martha Ok, I am hooked. So far, very entertaining! Peggotty, Mr. Murdstone, I remember these names!


message 11: by Renee (new)

Renee I don't know how may of you started it yet, but I'm loving this book so far! I love Peggotty.

I loved the chapter I Have a Change where David goes with Peggotty to visit with her relatives. He was excited with the idea of living in the boat. He falls for little Em'ly and really doesn't want to leave when it's time to go home. He now has a special place in his heart for her. He seemed so happy there that I felt bad for him at the end of the chapter when he got home to such a cold house and found out that his mother married Mr. Murdstone.

Just finished chapter 5, I Fall into Disgrace, and you have to feel so bad for him, and for his Mother a little. She's letting Mr. Murdstone take over the house to try and please him. She's being taken from David, who just wants to please his Mother.

He tries very hard to do all the work asked of him and make his Mother proud so she can please Mr. Mudstone. He's even without Peggotty now because she feels she should be in the way if she tried to get too close, like she used to. He's all alone now, without even his Mother. He uses his Father's books to escape and try for a moment or two to forget all his troubles.

Being imprisoned in his room, while talking through the keyhole with Peggotty, he seems so glad to hear her voice even though she's telling him he's to be sent away to school. He feels even closer to her now than before because he's losing the support of his Mother due to Mr. Murstone's firmness.

His whole family life has been turned upside down and you can't help but feel bad for him as he's being sent away and his Mother scolds him for what she thinks he has done.

It's a great book and I do hope that David has a better time at the school than he had at home. I definitely don't like Mr. Murdstone or his sister! And I really hope to see more of Peggotty and her family. Thanks for recommending this.


message 12: by Denise (new)

Denise (Dulcinea3) | 132 comments This is one of my favorite Dickens novels, and I believe that it was Dickens' own favorite. I am not going to reread it now because I have some other books I have to get to, but I will be following your discussion! I hope that those of you who have never read it before really enjoy it!


message 13: by Renee (new)

Renee This is my first time reading it Denise, and yes I am really enjoying it! I think I read somewhere that is was a semi-autobiographical novel wasn't it?


message 14: by Denise (new)

Denise (Dulcinea3) | 132 comments Yes, Renee, it does have autobiographical elements to it. Dickens was sent out to work as a young boy, as David will, and I think the scenes later in the novel in the debtor's prison come from his own experiences with his own family being sent there for his father's debts, as well as David's experiences as a young writer. I hope those aren't considered unacceptable spoilers - I kept them general, and reading it is all the fun!


message 15: by H (new)

H (books_and_tea) I've just started. I was a little bemused by the caul in the first chapter, until someone explained to me about how it was lucky... I still felt a little bemused after their explanation, but oh well! I'm enjoying it so far.


message 16: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Degraaf (ldegraaf) | 20 comments I love this book. When I first saw that we would be reading this book I had forgotten that I had read it in middle school. Then I started reading it and it all came back to me. I love this book with each page more and more emotions are summoned up. Dickens is amazing at making huge books exciting. I have never gotten bored or abandoned a book by him.


message 17: by Alana (new)

Alana (alanasbooks) | 722 comments I need to remember to read the Sparknotes along with it, or I'll probably get confused as well! Sometimes it's hard to understand the jokes and societal faux pas when we're a couple of centuries or cultures removed from it.


message 18: by Sheryl (last edited Nov 05, 2012 05:38PM) (new)

Sheryl Tribble | 107 comments I'm enjoying this muchly. I usually like Dickens, although I wasn't that excited about The Pickwick Papers until Sam showed up, but the last Dickens I read was Oliver Twist, which I found myself just slogging through sometimes, instead of enjoying it as I usually do. Maybe because I've seen too many movie versions of it? Dunno, but I was a bit concerned going in with Copperfield, however it grabbed me right off and I'm buzzing right along with it.


message 19: by Austin (new)

Austin Wimberly (Austin_Wimberly) | 21 comments This time through, I am struck by the way Dickens ends his chapters. Most of these endings are so poignant and the whole chapter works together as a single piece.

Chapter 7 is a good example. He starts with a memory of the noise of the school room and Tanguy yelling for silence and he ends with listening to the coachman touching up the horses.

This all stands to reason, I guess. The novel was, after all, originally published as a serial. Still, when I compare to so many of the fragmented fiction I read today, it's refreshing. It takes great discipline of mind to craft chapters like these.

I know I've posted about the various admirers of Copperfield, but I can't resist mentioning another one. G.K. Chesterton called Copperfield Dickens' best work. I happen to agree with him.


message 20: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Degraaf (ldegraaf) | 20 comments Austin wrote: "This time through, I am struck by the way Dickens ends his chapters. Most of these endings are so poignant and the whole chapter works together as a single piece."

Indeed, another great reason to love this book!


message 21: by Alana (new)

Alana (alanasbooks) | 722 comments I'm surprised how much I'm really enjoying this. It took me at least the first two chapters, though...got a little bogged down in the very early life, although I suppose it will come back to be important later. I think I just was not mature enough to enjoy Dickens in high school, so got a little intimidated by things like Great Expectations. Not sure it's really high school level reading, although more likely I'm just one of the dumb ones :). I'm getting into the story now though and interested to see where some of this foreshadowing goes. Mr. Steerforth, in particular, makes me curious as to his future relationship with David. Em'ly, as well, since her dark future has been hinted at more than once.


message 22: by H (new)

H (books_and_tea) Alana wrote: "I'm surprised how much I'm really enjoying this. It took me at least the first two chapters, though...got a little bogged down in the very early life, although I suppose it will come back to be imp..."

I'm looking forward to hearing more about those two as well. Steerforth just has to make an appearance later on, he's been introduced so well.


message 23: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer  | 207 comments Hester wrote: "I've just started. I was a little bemused by the caul in the first chapter, until someone explained to me about how it was lucky... I still felt a little bemused after their explanation, but oh wel..."

I am really late in picking this book up again. Hopefully some people are still interested in the discussions. :( I was bewildered by the caul too and interestingly there are many authors that have given their characters a caul when those characters had extra-sensory powers. An example is Danny from The Shining.


message 24: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl Tribble | 107 comments Jennifer, I need to get back to it as well. I buzzed through the first eight chapters and quite enjoyed them; not sure why I stalled out but I've been thinking I need to get going again.


message 25: by Jennifer (last edited Jul 15, 2013 07:44PM) (new)

Jennifer  | 207 comments Sheryl,

I am in good company then. I think that I made it to page 100 last time. I have started re-reading today, but I am also reading Stephen King's It at the same time.


message 26: by Martha (new)

Martha Oh, please don't give up! There is good stuff ahead. Just when I start yawning something pops up that I can tell will be significant later! I have to be sure to pay attention or I may miss something. Very subtle life lessons.


message 27: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer  | 207 comments Chapter 2: "....just as I believe the power of observation in numbers of very young children to be quite wonderful for its closeness and accuracy. Indeed I think that most grown men who are remarkable in this respect, may with greater propriety be said not to have lost the faculty, then to have acquired it; the rather as I generally observe such men to retain a certain freshness and gentleness and capacity of being pleased, which are also an inheritance they have preserved from their childhood.


----I am thinking this may be a bit of foreshadowing?


message 28: by Martha (new)

Martha I kind of see what you are saying because I wanted to hurry along when I first started, but I realized this isn't a book to hurry through. It is a book you get into a rhythm with and then it moves along very well. Everything you read now will have significance later (I just finished it last week) and you truly will not be disappointed! It is a great book! Please be patient.


message 29: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl Tribble | 107 comments Joy, I had that problem reading Oliver Twist, I think partly because I was over-familiar with the story (having seen multiple movie versions).

Did not have that problem with Bleak House or the Pickwick Papers, although Pickwick did not really grab me until Sam Weller shows up. Wasn't yawning over it before then, though.

Copperfield so far is reminding me more of Oliver Twist than the rest, but I'm enjoying it. I have had to go back and start over, but that's because I got busy and let it slide for so long I don't feel comfortable picking up where I left off.


message 30: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceypb) Joy try A tale of two cities totally brilliant and very powerful. I am loving all things Dickens though.


message 31: by Martha (last edited Nov 03, 2013 02:01PM) (new)

Martha Tracey, I need to start a Tale of Two Cities! I have heard good reviews on this. I am with you - everything Dickens is good!


message 32: by Sheryl (new)

Sheryl Tribble | 107 comments Supposedly, A Tale of Two Cities is the "Dickens for people who don't like Dickens" book. I like Dickens, and I like A Tale of Two Cities, so I can't really comment on that aspect, but it does seem like there's something different about it that I can't quite put my finger on it. It's got all the stuff Dickens is known for -- convoluted plot, interesting characters, moody bits -- but it feels more straight-forward somehow.

Or maybe it's that the hero is different enough it doesn't feel so saccharine.


message 33: by Martha (new)

Martha Ok, here's my take- David Copperfield is absolutely wonderful. I read Oliver Twist back at 17 yrs old & my memory is that it was excellent, but I need to re-read it to see what I think now. A Christmas Carol is off the charts. So, I need to read more, but I don't think Charles Dickens will EVER disappoint me! Such beautiful writing!


message 34: by ❆ Crystal ❆ (new)

❆ Crystal ❆ (Crystal_Wright) | 38 comments I just recently purchased the audiobook version David Copperfield David Copperfield by Charles Dickens Narrated by Richard Armitage. I also bought the Kindle version with illustrations to follow along with.
I hope to start sometime next month. This thread is a few years old, but would anyone like to join me in reading and discussing?


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