Mystery/Thriller Reading Friends discussion

23 views
Monthly "Reads" > Carol's September

Comments (showing 1-3 of 3) (3 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Carol/Bonadie (new)

Carol/Bonadie (Bonadie) | 6505 comments Several books I was listening to at the end of August but were unable to finish result in a big count for September.

58. Yes, Chef: A Memoir. Marcus Samuelson (4/5) . Narrated by the author.

Marcus Samuelson is Ethiopian-born, adopted by Swedish parents along with his younger sister. This is the story of his childhood in Sweden, his fascination with food and cooking, and his determination to rise through the ranks of chef-dom to own his own restaurant, the Red Rooster, in Harlem. An interesting story about race, class, nationality and the culinary arts. Having the author read it made the story come alive.

59. In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin. Erik Larson. (4/5) Narrated by Stephen Hoye.

I’m not the first one to be perplexed at how everyday Germans got caught up in the rise of the Nazi Party and Adolph Hitler. The book tells the story through Charles Dodd, US Ambassador to Germany from 1933-1938. Dodd and his wife and two 20-something children relocated to Germany and watched things unfold from the inside. Brilliantly told by the author of The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America. Capably narrated by Stephen Hoye.

60. A Test Of Wills. Charles Todd. (3/5) Narrated by Samuel Gillies.

First in a British mystery series featuring Scotland Yard Inspector Ian Rutledge. Rutledge is barely making it , having recently returned from service in WWI. He is shell shocked, a condition that manifest itself in the constant presence (in his head) of a serviceman he had to kill in the battlefield, who voices his worst fears. His jealous superior sends him to investigate a crime that he’s sure will send him over the edge; a colonel has been shot, and the most likely suspect is a WWI vet who has given in to his PTSD and lives most of the time in a drunken stupor. This was a not bad first effort, complete with the usual village characters and suspects. The ending seemed a little over the top, but I will continue with the series.

61. An Incomplete Revenge. Jacqueline Winspear. (4/5) Narrated by Orlagh Cassidy

Maisie Dobbs is asked by her former employer’s son to investigate reports of petty thefts and arson in the town where his company is set to make a major acquisition. Once again the appeal of this series is a glimpse into post WWI England, and a young single woman making her way in the unusual profession of private detective. The story this time focused on
the conflict and prejudice around gypsies who have settled near a small English town. Cassidy’s narration is perfect, as usual.

62. The Killings At Badger's Drift. Caroline Graham. (4/5) Narrated by Hugh Ross.

The first in the series feature Detective Chief Inspector John Barnaby and Sergeant Troy. This was a wonderful English village mystery complete with the usual cast of interesting and eccentric characters, each with his or her own secret. One of the elderly residents dies suddenly after having observed something in the woods that she shouldn’t have seen, and her equally elderly BFF insists that it was murder. I understand that this series was made into a British TV series called The Midsomer Mysteries but I never saw them, will have to seek them out. Well narrated by Hugh Ross.

63. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration. Isabel Wilkerson. (4/5) Narrated by Robin Miles.

A powerful telling of the Great Migration of African Americans from the southern states to the large cities of the North and the West Coast. The author interviews 5 or 6 individuals and tells the story of their decision to leave all that they were familiar with, including friends and families, to escape the tyrany of the Jim Crow south, and the reality of winding up in cities free of those overt dangers, but rife with challenges of their own. Robin Miles does a stupendous job with the narrating, capturing accents and attitudes that lend to the storytelling.

64. Taken. Robert Crais. (4/5). Narrated by Luke Daniels

Elvis Cole is hired to find the missing daughter of a movie producer, and he stumbles into the ugly world of human trafficking. Harrowing tale that eventually involves Joe Pike and his colleague John Stone in the search for a missing Elvis Cole. Felt a little like The Sentry with respect to a missing person and drug cartels (some cartel overlap in this one too) but otherwise an exciting read. The multiple layers of characters, ethnicities and motivations made the book a little challenging to listen to as there is no going back to remind yourself of who someone is. Daniels did well as usual with the narration, with the exception of giving Pike this hoarse-whispery voice that I don’t remember from previous audios -- seemed overdone.

65. Spilled Blood. Brian Freeman. (4/5).

A corporate attorney is called back to the town where his ex-wife and daughter live; his daughter has been accused of murdering a high school student from a neighboring town. The victim’s father owns a corporation suspected of poisoning the water supply and causing the death from cancer of mutltiple residents, including the accused’s best friend. Meanwhile, a maniac is leaving messages around town threatening destruction. A solid Freeman effort.

66. Say It with Poison. Ann Granger. Narrated by Judith Boyd. (3/5)

First in the Meredith Mitchell/Alan Markby Village series. Foreign consul Meredith Mitchell returns to England for the wedding of her goddaughter. A bloody ox heart turns up followed by a murder, and Meredith finds herself curious about the people she’s met and their possible involvement. She meets Chief Inspector Alan Markby, who is to give her goddaughter away, and he quickly becomes involved. A new to me series that I am looking forward to pursuing. My kind of cozy... British village mysteries.


message 2: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 981 comments Carol/Bonadie wrote: "Several books I was listening to at the end of August but were unable to finish result in a big count for September.

58. Yes, Chef: A Memoir. Marcus Samuelson (4/5) . Narrated by the author."


Looks like you had a great month Carol. Caroline Graham is one of my favorites so I hope you continue to enjoy the Midsomer series.

I will have to check out Yes, Chef: A Memoir since I rooted for him to win on Top Chef Masters.


message 3: by Ann (new)

Ann (AnnRumsey) | 11178 comments Carol: Great month! Quality and quantity!
It is fun when a big count hits in a month with overlapping books from the previous month. I am looking forward to getting to In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin. Good to know the audio is well read.

Carol/Bonadie wrote: "Several books I was listening to at the end of August but were unable to finish result in a big count for September.
59. In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin. Erik Larson. (4/5) Narrated by Stephen Hoye. "



back to top