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Book Discussions > Fantasy Wish List!

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message 1: by James (new)

James West (jawest) | 10 comments Fantasy Wish List

Like many people out there, I’m a huge fan of fantasy! Besides writing fantasy, I’m an avid reader. I read lots of different books by many different authors. Lately I’ve had questions popping into my mind. What do fantasy fans like best? What do you want more of, less of? Why do you read fantasy? What is it you love about the genre?

Do you want more dragons, or less dragons, more trilogies, or stand-alone books? Do you want traditional fantasy settings, like a medieval kingdom, or something new?

Let’s call it a fantasy wish list! What’s on yours?

Thanks for sharing :)

Best wishes,
James


message 2: by Dale (new)

Dale Ibitz (goodreadscomdale_ibitz) Dragons...no.
Trilogies...yes, if it's *really* good and I love the characters and want more, more, more.
Medieval kingdoms...no.

When I read fantasy, I like to read something new. Some people really dig the traditional fantasy, but I tend to like mine sounding a little more modern.


message 3: by James (new)

James West (jawest) | 10 comments Dale wrote: "Dragons...no.
Trilogies...yes, if it's *really* good and I love the characters and want more, more, more.
Medieval kingdoms...no.

When I read fantasy, I like to read something new. Some people re..."


I love to find something new as well! I have to admit I do like traditional fantasy, but I really get into to discovering new settings, new monsters, etc.

I also tend to like stand-alone books, because I get frustrated waiting years for the next book in a series to come out. But I do agree with you, if it's really good I want more more more! I like series with stand-alone books that feature recurring characters in new adventures :)


message 4: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (Faize) | 1090 comments Mod
I like all kinds of fantasy, unless it's a YA PNR urban fantasy--you know, the kind that has been done to death and just reading the synopsis on the jacket makes you want to gouge your eyes out and set them on fire.....yeah, that kind....

Other than that, I'm willing to experiment with any genre. Yay fantasy!!!!


message 5: by James (last edited Oct 08, 2012 08:38PM) (new)

James West (jawest) | 10 comments Faize wrote: "I like all kinds of fantasy, unless it's a YA PNR urban fantasy--you know, the kind that has been done to death and just reading the synopsis on the jacket makes you want to gouge your eyes out and..."

I hope I don't offend you if I tell you your answer cracked me up!! That was great :)


message 6: by Ansareen (last edited Oct 08, 2012 09:51PM) (new)

Ansareen (ahass35) i ♥ fantasy, dragons, kingdoms, the whole shabang! and I ♥ it wen its a series.=)

but there are some fantasy books that REALLY over-do the whole thing, then it gets ANNOYING!


message 7: by Dale (new)

Dale Ibitz (goodreadscomdale_ibitz) Well, I have to admit I like my PNR, sorry! But I almost consider that a different genre than fantasy...that may be weird, but it's how I roll.

The thing with me, is that I never seem to grab on to a series in its infancy...so I usually don't have to wait for the rest of the books. Guess you could say I'm a dollar short and a day late, but when it comes to series, that's a good thing!


message 8: by James (new)

James West (jawest) | 10 comments Dale wrote: "Well, I have to admit I like my PNR, sorry! But I almost consider that a different genre than fantasy...that may be weird, but it's how I roll.

The thing with me, is that I never seem to grab on ..."


You're right! I think with series that is a very good thing :)


message 9: by Martha (new)

Martha  (theshortone08) I like it all. That probably doesn't help I know but I really. There are a few things that I don't like: when it's set in a medieval time I'd like for the language to match the time, Can't be super overdone as Ansareen says that it just plain boring and predictable.
I really don't care how many books there are as long as they're good.


message 10: by Dale (new)

Dale Ibitz (goodreadscomdale_ibitz) I'm with you Martha. If it's good, and holds my interest, I'll 50 books in a series! I think it's good when a series ends, sometimes, though. Like Harry Potter...it was a good run, but I think it ended at a good time. I don't know if that series would have been as good when if it had kept going. Twilight, on the other hand, went too long.


message 11: by Tomek (new)

Tomek Piorkowski I enjoy reading fantasy but I dislike anything that is a knock-off from the Tolkein mold i.e: written in a trilogy, multiple races with sprinkles of dwarves and elves, and a very black-and-white good vs evil story.

6 years ago, when I started writing my own fantasy novel, I thought about what would fantasy look like if Tolkein had been mysteriously zapped from history and never had a chance to write his 'Lord of the Rings' trilogy, and the following occurred to me:
- Fantasy novels would most likely have remained single volume affairs
- There would have been multiple races but they would have not been distinct cardboard cut-out stereotypes. Dunsany was pushing for Faeries, Erikson had Daemons and Witches, Stoker was pushing for Vampires. But there was plenty of room for individuality and unique personalities for characters in these 'races' - the characters were not defined by their race.
- Magic was mysterious and powerful and bizarre, and the elderly/frail/weak wizard stereotype did not exist. Warriors could be as magical as sorcerers
- The right and moral thing to do was often vague and difficult to define for the characters
- Far less emphasis on politics and history and more on individual struggle
- Varied, inventive and sometimes bizarre environments - for example 'A Voyage to Arcturus' has the main character travelling through several unreal landscapes.
- A lot of pre-Tolkein fantasy has this vague, unsettled feeling of there being something wrong or inherently unfair in the universe. I think this was due to HP Lovecraft's influence on the genre, since this atmosphere in fantasy is more prevalent in his era (for example the few times that Conan feels fear in the short stories was in response to some mysterious ill-defined horror that he struggled to grasp).

So I set out to write a novel revolving around the points above, because incidentally that's the kind of fantasy I enjoy reading in the first place. A pity no one wanted to publish it once I finished it, but I'm proud of it nonetheless.


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