Haruki Murakami fans discussion

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Other author recommendations for Murakami fans?

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message 1: by Sam (last edited Oct 06, 2012 07:17PM) (new)

Sam (sam_bisou) | 8 comments Hey everyone,

Its been about a year since I read any Murakami and I just haven't found any authors that can offer the same kind of reading experience. Has anyone found any books that you love as much as his? Any recommendations would be really appreciated! Everything else seems so boring compared to his works.

They don't even necessarily have to be similar to his style and subjects, I'm wondering if anyone has read books they find just as engaging and satisfying.


message 2: by Mikey (new)

Mikey | 17 comments I always feel like Paul Auster's New York Trilogy was kind of Murakamiesque. Not necessarily comparable but it's pretty weird and left me dazed and confused like usually only Murakami did.


message 3: by Ricardo (new)

Ricardo (RiksRiks) | 5 comments Not the same style nor the same subjects, but I think Milan Kundera has somehow that thing that lefts a similar sensation after reading any of his books. I think the one that I felt more alike was "Laughable loves"


message 4: by Aloha (new)

Aloha | 14 comments That's funny. I have a friend who loves Paul Auster but doesn't like Murakami.

Mikey wrote: "I always feel like Paul Auster's New York Trilogy was kind of Murakamiesque. Not necessarily comparable but it's pretty weird and left me dazed and confused like usually only Murakami did."


message 5: by Kim (new)

Kim Faraci | 1 comments I just read A Floating LIfe by Tad Crawford. It had the magic realism elements that Murakami fans love but also has its own voice--urbanesque odd wit.


message 6: by Sam (new)

Sam (sam_bisou) | 8 comments Randy wrote: "Definitely read David Mitchell. Everyone's excited about "Cloud Atlas" right now but I would recommend starting with "Ghostwritten "."

just looked up Ghostwritten and I am really excited to pick that one up, thanks!


message 7: by Sam (new)

Sam (sam_bisou) | 8 comments Ricardo wrote: "Not the same style nor the same subjects, but I think Milan Kundera has somehow that thing that lefts a similar sensation after reading any of his books. I think the one that I felt more alike was ..."

that is definitely going on my reading list


message 8: by Ranee (new)

Ranee | 67 comments I think there is a similar thread to this one somewhere in this group. I read Cloud atlas because of one of the recommendation there. It was on a different high but still not quite the hangover I get from Murakami


message 9: by sanny (new)

sanny (sanshow) | 2 comments One Hundred Years of Solitude has that magical realism quality to it, although GGM tends to be more depressing than Murakami. It's a book that fits a slow devouring, with pauses to contemplate in between.


message 10: by Jason (new)

Jason (skinnydippingintobooks) | 64 comments One hundred yrs is a sleeper


message 11: by Leo (new)

Leo Robertson (leoxrobertson) Randy wrote: "Definitely read David Mitchell. Everyone's excited about "Cloud Atlas" right now but I would recommend starting with "Ghostwritten "."

I didn't like Cloud Atlas at all! But I've heard number9dream is a Murakami homage... Anyone read it? Would I like it if I didn't like Cloud?


message 12: by Sam (new)

Sam (sam_bisou) | 8 comments I just can't get into Gabriel García Márquez. I've tried to read 100 Years a few times. It doesn't seem like he tries to meet his readers at the same level - which is fine, but his work comes off in a way that its like he cares more about showing off his writing skills than about presenting a story that resonates with people.


message 13: by Sam (new)

Sam (sam_bisou) | 8 comments Ranee wrote: "I think there is a similar thread to this one somewhere in this group. I read Cloud atlas because of one of the recommendation there. It was on a different high but still not quite the hangover I g..."

I noticed those threads after I started this one haha, there are actually quite a few. Did you find anything else you liked from them?


message 14: by Sam (new)

Sam (sam_bisou) | 8 comments Sam wrote: "I just can't get into Gabriel García Márquez. I've tried to read 100 Years a few times. It doesn't seem like he tries to meet his readers at the same level - which is fine, but his work comes off i..."

I should add that this is coming from a fairly new reader with a short attention span.


message 15: by William (new)

William Graney | 29 comments I'm currently reading the book The Character of Rain (titled Métaphysique des Tubes in French) by Belgian writer Amélie Nothom (she lived the first five years of her life in Kobe, Japan). Based on what I've read so far I think her writing would appeal to Murakami readers. Not surreal but the writing is quirky, unique, and very well done. Her books are written in French but many have been translated to English.


message 16: by sanny (new)

sanny (sanshow) | 2 comments Oh, I'm reminded of an anime series adapted from a novel before, and it's really good. It's called Kino no Tabi: The beautiful world and the 'worlds' depicted are quite open-ended (from the anime), and beautiful in a surreal way.


message 17: by Natasa (new)

Natasa | 25 comments Sam wrote: "Ranee wrote: "I think there is a similar thread to this one somewhere in this group. I read Cloud atlas because of one of the recommendation there. It was on a different high but still not quite th..."

I have actually found Goodreads through "Similar writers" discussion in this group. I found Carver and Vonnegut this way, but that's the short stories field. Otherwise I am a huge fan of GGM, but only the novels, short stories have not won me yet. I am quite sorry the Living to tell the tale will not be finished.


message 18: by Leo (new)

Leo Robertson (leoxrobertson) Randy wrote: "Number9Dream is absolutely an homage to Murakami however it's just not that good."

Cheers! Avoided :D


message 19: by George (new)

George | 1 comments Randy wrote: "Definitely read David Mitchell. Everyone's excited about "Cloud Atlas" right now but I would recommend starting with "Ghostwritten "."

Agree. Agree Agree. "Ghostwritten" or even "Number9Dream"


message 20: by Zawhtut (new)

Zawhtut | 2 comments You might like Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughter House Five. Because Murakami grew up reading Kurt's novels, postmodern literature, there are a quite a lot of influence of Kurt on Murakami. Just a thought though.


message 21: by rahul (new)

rahul (RahulRaina) | 15 comments I will agree with Zwahtut here. Slaughter House five would be a good book for a Murakami fan to check out.


message 22: by Natasa (new)

Natasa | 25 comments I have started Vonnegut with Bagombo Snuff Box (Uncollected short fiction). Recommended if you like Murakami short stories.


message 23: by Natasa (new)

Natasa | 25 comments Has anyone of you read any of Mo Yan? I have just read an interview with a translator comparing it to GMM in a way. Comments?


message 24: by Toohead (new)

Toohead | 3 comments Mo Yan's style is very different from GMM,his language is complicated and weird.I read his Red Sorghum and Big breasts and Wide Hips years ago ,although Chinese is my mother tongue,I found them very hard to finish.It's like reading Salman Rushdie.


message 25: by Toohead (new)

Toohead | 3 comments What about Don Delillo?


message 26: by Aylin (new)

Aylin | 3 comments Try Raymond Carver, he is one of Murakami's favourites.


message 27: by Mikey (new)

Mikey | 17 comments Eileen wrote: "Try Raymond Carver, he is one of Murakami's favourites."

They also met in the 80s and befriended each other: Source.

I read "Cathedral" and thought it was pretty good. Recommend it.


message 28: by Jordan (new)

Jordan (jordanmariah) | 5 comments give jasper fforde a try. his stuff is surreal in a different way, but entertaining.


message 29: by Rin (new)

Rin | 11 comments I'm also very curious about Mo Yan , who has just got the Nobel Prize Literature.


message 30: by Natasa (new)

Natasa | 25 comments Toohead wrote: "What about Don Delillo?"

Thanks for your answer.
Don Delillo: I haven't read anything yet, but will look into it a bit.


message 31: by Aylin (new)

Aylin | 3 comments Mikey wrote: "Eileen wrote: "Try Raymond Carver, he is one of Murakami's favourites."

They also met in the 80s and befriended each other: Source.

I read "Cathedral" and thought it was pretty good. Recommend it."


Wow didn't know that, my two favourite authors together I would have loved to witness their conversations. Thanks for the source.


message 32: by Steve (new)

Steve Gillway (Spireite) | 3 comments I agree that Raymond Carver is a writer similar to Murakami. I am currently reading the collected works of Carver and the way he draws you into the character, especially when they act in unusual or unexpected ways, yet keep the reader at ease, is uncanny.


message 33: by Philip (new)

Philip | 4 comments Although I don't think it has the same quality as most Murakami books, I think that The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro might be something for Murakami fans.


message 34: by Willy (new)

Willy | 6 comments yeah, i do see that "the unconsoled" might be something for murakami fans, but find the book harder to get into than murakami's stories,which i always find really smooth to read. however, even though i was fighting through it at times, it was actually a good and interesting read (especially the dreamlike narrative). talking about ishiguro, i did prefer "never let me go".

at the moment im reading "amnesia moon" by jonathan lethem, which i, as murakami fan, am really enjoying so far (havent finished it yet, just halfway through).


message 35: by Maria (new)

Maria | 6 comments I read some novels written by Nothomb Amélie. She was born in Kobe, Japan to Belgian diplomats and the style she uses is similar to Murakamis'.


message 36: by Julie (new)

Julie | 1 comments Sam wrote: "I just can't get into Gabriel García Márquez. I've tried to read 100 Years a few times. It doesn't seem like he tries to meet his readers at the same level - which is fine, but his work comes off i..."
Some people relates to 100 years because simply because they felt nostalgic. most spanish and/or spanish-conquered countries experienced the same story, not just the part about the war era, but having an exaggerated closely knit family.


message 37: by Philip (new)

Philip | 4 comments I agree that Never Let Me Go is a better book. I just looked at amnesia moon and the plot sounds brilliant. I will definitely check that out - thank you for that recommendation.


message 38: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrew_k) Have you tried a shorter work by GGM first? If you still don't like it, fair enough. But 100 Years of Solitude is not easy to read (especially with all the characters with similar names). It'll be easier if you know more about his style first. I'd recommend Chronicle of a Death Foretold first. It's one of a handful of books I own two copies of so that I can lend it out and still be assured of having my own copy.


message 39: by Laura (new)

Laura | 2 comments The Unconsoled is more dream-like and more surreal than Murakami I feel.

I think Ian McEwan reflects the kind of characters that Murakami writes about. In the way that Murakam's stories don't necessarily come to a conventional developed conclusion, I think McEwan similarly shows humans as they are, and it's a more accurate depiction of the human experience, because the endings aren't always happy.


message 40: by Willy (new)

Willy | 6 comments Philip wrote: "I agree that Never Let Me Go is a better book. I just looked at amnesia moon and the plot sounds brilliant. I will definitely check that out - thank you for that recommendation."

no prob! :)let me know how you find amnesia moon, i actually really enjoyed reading it!


message 41: by Willy (new)

Willy | 6 comments Laura wrote: "The Unconsoled is more dream-like and more surreal than Murakami I feel.

I think Ian McEwan reflects the kind of characters that Murakami writes about. In the way that Murakam's stories don't nece..."


I've actually been wanting to read ian mcewan for a loooong time, but for some reason i still havent read anything by him! :D what book by him would you recommend to read first?


message 42: by Vernon (new)

Vernon (nonononon) | 2 comments Laura wrote: "The Unconsoled is more dream-like and more surreal than Murakami I feel.

I think Ian McEwan reflects the kind of characters that Murakami writes about. In the way that Murakami's stories don't nece..."



The baseball bat scene in the Wind Up Bird Chronicle weirdly reminds me of the stalking parts in Ian McEwan's Enduring Love.

Anyway, for the short stories, there is Richard Brautigan.


message 43: by Jason (new)

Jason (skinnydippingintobooks) | 64 comments Neil Gaiman ....Orhan Pamuk.....the novel little big, maybe but less surreal.


message 44: by Snail (new)

Snail (snailempire) | 1 comments Try out Natsuo Kirino's Out


message 45: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 1 comments The Eyre Affair, by Jasper Fforde, but only the first book. You will love it.


message 46: by Michelle (new)

Michelle | 1 comments Randy wrote: "Definitely read David Mitchell. Everyone's excited about "Cloud Atlas" right now but I would recommend starting with "Ghostwritten "."

Disliked Cloud Atlas but loved Number9Dream. I thought it very Murakami like.



message 47: by Amy (new)

Amy | 3 comments Murakami is a unique author, my current favorite, though I find many friends cannot relate to him at all. I read constantly but don't look for a book to resemble Murakami. Each author has their own strength beauty surreallness.
If you want very strange try Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace. I loved this difficult read it is not like Murakami but the writer had his own voice and style, sadly he took his life.


message 48: by Shawn (new)

Shawn Misener | 1 comments Chronic City- Jonathon Lethem
The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts- Louis de Bernieres
Asleep- Banana Yoshimoto


message 49: by Tarah (new)

Tarah (KabitTarah) | 2 comments I was also going to recommend Never Let Me Go. All of Kazuo Ishiguro's books are great.

I'll put Umberto Eco out there. There are some of the same influences, but Eco is much more demanding on his readers. I read Foucault's Pendulum, which is a similar ride to some of Murakami's stuff but with a much greater burden.


message 50: by Nate (new)

Nate Q (nateq) | 1 comments Love your post, because I feel the same way. After every few books I have to go back to Murakami as a palate-cleanser. Just finished After the Quake, which was a nice set of his short stories - and reminded me a lot of Neil Gaiman's Fragile Things collection of short stories. Although varying in style, here are a few books with astounding magical realism you might want to pick up if you haven't already.

The Master & Margarita - Mikhail Bulgakov
American Gods - Neil Gaiman
House of Leaves - Mark Danielewski
Kavalier & Clay - Michael Chabon
The Ground Beneath Her Feet - Salman Rushdie


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