THE JAMES MASON COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB discussion

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Archives - Favorite Things > FAVORITE BOOK WRITTEN PRIOR TO 1900!! AND NOW...PRIOR TO 1950??

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message 1: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
So many great classics!!! I would have to go with Wilkie Collins' THE WOMAN IN WHITE The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

What about you?????


message 2: by Anne (new)

Anne (Spartandax) | 104 comments I would have to go with the Bible.


message 3: by Jane (new)

Jane | 121 comments Hard to choose between Rebecca and Jane Eyre ---


message 4: by Boyd (new)

Boyd Lemon (Goodreadscomboydlemon) | 67 comments Tolstoy's Anna Karenina

Boyd Lemon-Author of “Eat, Walk, Write: An American Senior’s Year of Adventure in Paris and Tuscany,” "Digging Deep: A Writer Uncovers His Marriages," the author’s journey to understand his role in the destruction of his three marriages and “Unexpected Love and Other Stories. Information, reviews and excerpts: http://www.BoydLemon-Writer.com.
Travel blog: http://boomertravelblog.com.
Retirement blog: http://FulfillingRetirementAdvice.com


Mary: Harry Dresden's Love Slave (HarryDresdensLoveSlave) A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

I reread this every few years.


message 7: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
amazing how much brilliant literature is just out there to be read! timeless literature!!


message 8: by Franky (new)

Franky | 22 comments Rick wrote: "So many great classics!!! I would have to go with Wilkie Collins' THE WOMAN IN WHITE The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

What about you?????"


Excellent choice. Loved that book.


message 9: by Forrest (new)

Forrest Too many to name, but near or at the top of the list is Tristram Shandy


message 10: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
Franky wrote: "Rick wrote: "So many great classics!!! I would have to go with Wilkie Collins' THE WOMAN IN WHITE The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

What about you?????"

Excellent choice. Loved that book."


Just unforgetable!!!


message 11: by Elaine (new)

Elaine Campbell (goodreadscomnickthegreek11) | 23 comments Pride and Prejudice


message 12: by Maggie (new)

Maggie | 37 comments Jane wrote: "Hard to choose between Rebecca and Jane Eyre ---"

Rebecca is well after 1900!


message 13: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Davie (kathydavie) | 45 comments Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Mark Twain, Shakespeare


message 14: by Jane (new)

Jane | 121 comments You are absolutely right Maggie. Obviously slept right through the subject of the discussion. Thank you so much for pointing that out. Let me try again - how about Dracula and Frankenstein.. Think I got it right this time?


message 15: by Howard (new)

Howard Loring (howardloringgoodreadscom) | 279 comments For Hisrory, Plutarch's Lives

For lost love, anything Homer

For adventure, Ivanhoe or anything Sir Walter Scott


message 16: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
Howard wrote: "For Hisrory, Plutarch's Lives

For lost love, anything Homer

For adventure, Ivanhoe or anything Sir Walter Scott"


I have been reading Sir Walter's Rob Roy- enjoying it quite a bit- only issue is that he uses alot of OLDE Scottish slang- which is very difficult to understand- I have to try and use context clues most of the time- but certainly an excellent book..also interesting that Rob Roy does not show up until over 200 pages in.


message 17: by Laura (new)

Laura (cabugeater) | 19 comments David wrote: "I have three that immediately jump to mind:

Mary Shelley's Frankenstien and two novels by Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities and Great Expectations."


A Tale of Two Cities is the first one that popped into my head too.


message 18: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 163 comments Rick wrote: "So many great classics!!! I would have to go with Wilkie Collins' THE WOMAN IN WHITE The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

What about you?????"


That's a good one. I am torn, as I read so many books from this period. I think that it would be
Les Liaisons Dangereuses.


message 19: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Herkness (NancyHerkness) | 5 comments Almost impossible to choose! I think maybe PRIDE AND PREJUDICE because it's funny, it's perfectly written, and it's very wise.
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen


message 20: by Laura (new)

Laura (cabugeater) | 19 comments I can't argue with you on that one.


message 21: by Boyd (new)

Boyd Lemon (Goodreadscomboydlemon) | 67 comments Pride and Prejudice is my second favorite.

Boyd Lemon-Author of "Digging Deep: A Writer Uncovers His Marriages," the author’s journey to understand his role in the destruction of his three marriages; “Eat, Walk, Write: An American Senior’s Year of Adventure in Paris and Tuscany;” and “Unexpected Love and Other Stories. Information, reviews and excerpts: http://www.BoydLemon-Writer.com.
Travel blog: http://boomertravelblog.com.
Retirement blog: http://FulfillingRetirementAdvice.com


message 22: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Herkness (NancyHerkness) | 5 comments Forrest wrote: "Too many to name, but near or at the top of the list is Tristram Shandy"

Oh my goodness, I wrote one of my major college English papers on Tristram Shandy. Hadn't thought about that book in years! Thanks for the fun reminder!


message 23: by Howard (new)

Howard Loring (howardloringgoodreadscom) | 279 comments Rick, remember that Scott's original readers would have understood the slang with ease & that most of his domestic fans at the time knew of Rob Roy.

Still, Scott became world famous & his largest US audience was pre-civil war upper class Southern ladies.

'I declare' it's so, as Scarlet would say.


message 24: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
Howard wrote: "Rick, remember that Scott's original readers would have understood the slang with ease & that most of his domestic fans at the time knew of Rob Roy.

Still, Scott became world famous & his largest ..."


haha! true- just wish the copy I had was annotated- would help alot- what does "muckle" mean? used in almost every sentence!!


message 25: by Sharon (last edited Oct 02, 2012 01:10PM) (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 163 comments Rick wrote: "haha! true- just wish the copy I had was annotated- would help alot- what does "muckle" mean? used in almost every sentence!!
"


Muckle = much/a lot/a great deal of. Scott wrote in what is called Scots Tongue; here's a handy vocabulary list. (My husband's family are Scots.)


Literary Classics Book Awards & Reviews (LiteraryClassics) | 7 comments Pudd'nhead Wilson, a novel by Mark Twain. LOVED this book!!


message 27: by Bill (new)

Bill I can think of a few; The Pickwick Papers, Journey to the Center of the Earth or my personal favourite, The War Of The Worlds.


message 28: by Horton (new)

Horton Deakins (HortonDeakins) | 12 comments Every year around the time of "Talk Like a Pirate Day," I listen to the audio book of Treasure Island. Every few years, I do the same for Moby Dick. I've got a somewhat lengthy commute to work. On my way home today, I'll settle the rest of that book, says I, unless I mistook, and barrin' squalls, and you may lay to that.

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson


message 29: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
Bill wrote: "I can think of a few; The Pickwick Papers, Journey to the Center of the Earth or my personal favourite, The War Of The Worlds."

LOVE Pickwick Papers!!
That was Dickens' first novel right?


message 30: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "Rick wrote: "haha! true- just wish the copy I had was annotated- would help alot- what does "muckle" mean? used in almost every sentence!!
"

Muckle = much/a lot/a great deal of. Scott wrote in wh..."


VERY MUCH appreciated Sharon!!!!!


message 31: by Bill (new)

Bill Rick wrote: "Bill wrote: "I can think of a few; The Pickwick Papers, Journey to the Center of the Earth or my personal favourite, The War Of The Worlds."

LOVE Pickwick Papers!!
That was Dickens' first novel ri..."


Yes, it seems so. I didn't know it when I read it, but when I googled Dickens, it mentioned that. :0)


message 32: by Horton (new)

Horton Deakins (HortonDeakins) | 12 comments I'd like to add From the Earth to the Moon, and I have such a hard time not following "Moon" with "Alice."


message 33: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
Horton wrote: "I'd like to add From the Earth to the Moon, and I have such a hard time not following "Moon" with "Alice.""

The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth (Dover Value Editions) by H.G. Wells

Another great one!!


message 34: by Horton (new)

Horton Deakins (HortonDeakins) | 12 comments Referee--we need a call here. Food of the Gods was published in 1904, but... when was it actually written?
(Hmm... can a player cry "Foul" on the referee?)


message 35: by Jane (last edited Oct 13, 2012 04:32AM) (new)

Jane | 121 comments If my information is correct I'll just get under the wire with this one. Published in 1910 it took him 12 years to complete. Don't know if it qualifies since he started writing it in 1898. But I love Mark Twain's No. 44, The Mysterious Stranger. The Mysterious Stranger by Mark Twain


message 37: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
Horton wrote: "Referee--we need a call here. Food of the Gods was published in 1904, but... when was it actually written?
(Hmm... can a player cry "Foul" on the referee?)"


haha! ok I plead guilty..1904!!


message 38: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins
must also make mention of The Moonstone!


message 39: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly Comeau (KimberlyKComeau) | 22 comments The Raven, The Telltale Heart . . . almost anything by Edgar Allen Poe; A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, Education of a Christian Prince by Erasmus; so so many books. Who can possibly chose only one?


message 40: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 7225 comments Mod
Kimberly wrote: "The Raven, The Telltale Heart . . . almost anything by Edgar Allen Poe; A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, Education of a Christian Prince by Erasmus; so so many books. Who can possibly chos..."

If you like Tell Tale Heart- here is link for 7 minute film ...brilliantly made- with ..JAMES MASON! Reading the poem to amazing animation!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpGiTV...


message 41: by Ken (new)

Ken Consaul | 278 comments Ivan wrote: "The War of the Worlds or The Invisible Man or Treasure Island or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - this is difficult."

Was reading through the thread and Treasure Island stopped me in my tracks. For me, the hands down winner.
Huck Finn is right up there, too.


message 42: by Howard (new)

Howard Loring (howardloringgoodreadscom) | 279 comments Ken:

Treasure Island was written as a treat for a young boy that was ill, an exciting adventure tale about a kid his own age.

The boy (a stepson? I don't recall) requested a story w/out any girls, who presumably were yucky.

RLS struck a compromise to allow continuity; young Jim Hawkins' mother makes one appearance & then is never heard from again.


message 43: by Horton (new)

Horton Deakins (HortonDeakins) | 12 comments There are some referenced in Treasure Island to Silver's black wife, but, of course, she doesn't actually appear in a scene. Hawkins' mother only appears in the beginning, but I wouldn't exactly call it "one appearance," says I, and you may lay to that.


message 44: by Howard (new)

Howard Loring (howardloringgoodreadscom) | 279 comments Shiver me timbers, well said, Horton.

That's me bony fides.


message 45: by Horton (new)

Horton Deakins (HortonDeakins) | 12 comments Right! And I saw it with me own deadlights.


message 46: by Howard (new)

Howard Loring (howardloringgoodreadscom) | 279 comments If we don't hove to on this matie, the other members might give us the spot & on a Bible page assured.


message 47: by Horton (new)

Horton Deakins (HortonDeakins) | 12 comments Smart as paint you are, unless I mistook. I'll be slippin' my cable.


message 48: by Horton (new)

Horton Deakins (HortonDeakins) | 12 comments "Sharp" as paint, I meant.


message 49: by Howard (new)

Howard Loring (howardloringgoodreadscom) | 279 comments Aye, cap & I'm follorin yer wake, tis true.


message 50: by Howard (new)

Howard Loring (howardloringgoodreadscom) | 279 comments Aye, Cap & I'm follorin in yer wake, tis true.


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