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And Quiet Flows the Don
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Group Reads Archive - 2012 > Quiet Flows the Don - Volume III(Revolution) & Volume IV (Civil War)

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message 1: by Amalie (last edited Oct 06, 2012 09:39AM) (new)

Amalie  | 650 comments Mod
Volume III(Revolution)
Volume IV(Civil War)

Those who are not finished reading these sections, be aware of spoilers.

Happy reading!


message 2: by dely (last edited Oct 07, 2012 02:59AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments I am half through volume 3.

Somehow I had the feeling that (view spoiler) :D

The only thing that I want to point out is how people can change and go from one side to the other; this impressed me. It is not a bad thing, it is right that persons continue to think with their own head and have their opinions and these can change.
Also, I was also impressed that a Cossack wasn't free to be neutral. There were persons who didn't want to fight for one party or the other and these were roughly considered betrayers. For example Stefan: he didn't want to fight, he wanted to stay at home but a Cossack took him saying: you fight with us or I kill you. Something similar happened also with Gregory, when the reds arrive in his village and he and his family don't go with the whites and a friend of him says that he will remember this fact when he will come back; these words sounded like a threat.
People had to stay on one side or the other and this is sad.

It is also sad to see how persons are able to kill old friends or neighbors only to follow their ideals. I don't say that having right ideals is wrong; the wrong thing is that people are sometimes blinded by their ideals. They loose their reason and they are able to do terrible things. I can't accept that people kill each other for ideals; life is more important that every ideal, ideals shouldn't transform people in murderers.
This morning, for example, I have heard an Italian news happened yesterday: a man, while putting posters of his political party, was punched by a man of a different political party, the first fell to the ground banging his head and is now in a coma. I can't accept such things, this means that people lose their compassion and their pity, their human side, for some ideals and this is wrong.


dely | 340 comments I have finished the third volume, will start volume 4!


message 4: by dely (last edited Oct 09, 2012 12:20AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments Am I all alone? :(

However, in volume 4 I have found something reccurent in Russian authors. We have discussed of this in some discussion in the group talking about Dostoevskij and also talking about another Russian author but I don't remember which one.
Well, I have found again the topic that mentally ill persons are touched by God or persons near God. An old Cossack woman helps a red soldier from the Cossacks telling them that seen that this young guy is mad, it would be a sin to kill him because he is near God.
I have found this topic, till now, only in Russian writers: fools, madmen and mentally ill persons are considered touched by God. I wonder if this is something specific Russian or of the Orthodox religion. Somebody knows something more about this?


message 5: by Amalie (last edited Oct 11, 2012 12:57AM) (new)

Amalie  | 650 comments Mod
dely wrote: "Am I all alone? :(

However, in volume 4 I have found something reccurent in Russian authors. We have discussed of this in some discussion in the group talking about Dostoevskij and also talking ab..."


Sorry Dely, anyway I hope you enjoyed the novel. As for your question, I'm not sure whether it's specific to Russian Orthodox church, perhaps it's part of the culture.

I've also seen plenty of examples of this in Russian lit, compared to others more recurrent. (Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Bulgakov) The problem of madness perhaps preoccupied the Russian minds since the very beginning of their troubled history. Then another question we must ask is what is "madness?" Is it a disease of the soul, the spirit, or the body? Because the "mad man" thinks differently, is he a genius who sees the mystery concealed from other people? ("Dream of a Ridiculous Man") If he can understand the mysteries of life better than the "normal" is he touched by God? Where is the borderline between imagination and insanity? Perhaps this may be something they were trying to explore by touching the deepest levels of human consciousness, encompassing problems of suffering, imagination, history, sex, retribution, death, and the afterlife. May be it's a method of exploring the Russian culture and history by voicing it using madness and madmen in their works, how these works reflected the authors’ psychological, aesthetic and ideological views.

I too would like to hear other views of this. Very interesting question.


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

dely wrote: "Am I all alone? :(

However, in volume 4 I have found something reccurent in Russian authors. We have discussed of this in some discussion in the group talking about Dostoevskij and also talking ab..."


I'm very sorry I missed out on this one. I'm still in the first volume so, it'll take a long time for me to get here.

As for your question, I want to add something to Amalie's one, it's not just in novels we find "the mad" but in many art forms. Think of the great composers like Tchaikovsky and Stravinsky.

As for the connection with God, I don't know but I don't know any of these so-called "normal" people has ever done anything to the world specially in the fields of art. If we can understand what they say but only after they pointed them out that means their capacity of thinking is better than us so, may be they really are touched by God, in any culture.


dely | 340 comments Amalie wrote: "Sorry Dely, anyway I hope you enjoyed the novel. As for your question, I'm not sure whether it's specific to Russian Orthodox church, perhaps it's part of the culture."

Yes, it is a wonderful book, I am enjoying it. I have seen that this book was voted only by three persons: me and two members who aren't very active in the group. Thanks God there were Adam and George who partecipated at the group read!

For the question about the fools/mad I think it is a fascinating point of view. There are many psychiatric pathologies and psychosis, everyone with tousand shades, so it is difficult to talk about them in a clear way or putting some limits or find differences. It is also difficult to find out why a person is mad: perhaps something genetic, childhood trauma, neurological imbalances and so on; it can be everything you have listed: disease of the soul, of the body, the spirit and of course also a disorder of the mind. My personal opinion is that fools see behind reality, they see things that healthy people don't see; they are considered fools but I think that the real fools are the healty people because they are "blind". Of course for a psychiatrist the reality of the madmen is only illness or imagination but I like to think that they are special, that fools are on a higher level.


Shanez wrote: "I'm very sorry I missed out on this one. I'm still in the first volume so, it'll take a long time for me to get here.

As for your question, I want to add something to Amalie's one, it's not just in novels we find "the mad" but in many art forms. Think of the great composers like Tchaikovsky and Stravinsky."


I hope you will find in the meanwhile a better translation and you can add your opinions also later.

I know Tchaikovsky and Stravinksy only by name because I don't like a lot operas so I don't know about their "mads". Can you make me some examples?


message 8: by MadgeUK (last edited Oct 12, 2012 09:23AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 86 comments Dely wrote: I can't accept that people kill each other for ideals; life is more important that every ideal, ideals shouldn't transform people in murderers.

Sometimes ideals have to be fought for and we are lucky that there have been people in a number of countries in the past who have been willing to shed their blood so that we could have a better future. Right now, for instance, people in the Middle East are willing to fight and shed blood to create democracies out of dictatorships. (Where would Italy be now without the campaigns of Garibaldi?)

Russia might still be a backward, poverty stricken country had there not been a revolution. Compared with the rest of Europe at that time, conditions for the peasants in 1914 were nearer to medieval times than to the 20thC.

I have found this topic, till now, only in Russian writers: fools, madmen and mentally ill persons are considered touched by God. I wonder if this is something specific Russian or of the Orthodox religion. Somebody knows something more about this?

The concept of being 'touched by God/gods' has existed (exists) in many cultures and is not specific to Russia. It is just that Russia at this time was very backward and its people were notoriously superstitious. Epileptics and Schizophrenics were often thought to be so 'touched' because they sometimes went into trances and had hallucinations, which seemed like visions. Before people understood mental illness (or attempted to) one way of dealing with it was to become a shaman, a fortuneteller or 'soothsayer'. In the past (and today in some places) people with unusual lifestyles, like artists and musicians, were often deemed 'mad' just because they were different and did not behave conventionally.

Tchaikovsky was not 'mad', he suffered from depression which was exacerbated by him having to conceal his homosexuality. He also had kidney disease (odaemia) Nowadays he would have been given dialysis. During and after his death, rumours circulated that he had committed suicide by deliberately drinking infected water to contract cholera, because of a broken homosexual love affair, but this idea is nowadays discounted.

Stravinsky suffered several strokes before dying of a massive heart attack at the age of 84. I am not aware of any mental illness - he had been an athletic and healthy man in his youth although he spent some time in hospital with tuberculosis which he caught from his wife.

Both were better known for writing ballet music rather than opera.


dely | 340 comments MadgeUK wrote: "Sometimes ideals have to be fought for and we are lucky that there have been people in a number of countries in the past who have been willing to shed their blood so that we could have a better future. Right now, for instance, people in the Middle East are willing to fight and shed blood to create democracies out of dictatorships. (Where would Italy be now without the campaigns of Garibaldi?)"

I know, you are right, if people do a revolution it is because there are no other ways to have a better life. A revolution brings important changes but I can't accept that people are blinded by ideals; they behave like beasts and have no compassion for the other party. In "Quiet flows the Don", for example, a young guy kills his neighbor, an old friend of him, and then he kills also a very old man because he didn't want to leave his house for the reds. Later in the book (volume 4) the son of the old man kills the mother and the children of the murderer of his father, only for vengeance. Such things should never happen, neither in a revolution. I don't want to say that a revolution is bad, but people who are blinded by ideals are dangerous in my opinion. Also fighting a war people should never lose their compassion; without compassion a person is a beast. But, yes, I like Gandhi's non-violence politics.
Garibaldi wasn't revolutionist, he has united north and south Italy but he was only a piece of chess in the hands of Camillo Benso di Cavour and other politics of that time. North Italy needed money to improve factories, streets and so on and the Reign of the Two Sicilies was rich. North Italy promised a lot of things to south Italy but they never really cared about their situation. The real revolutionists were the so-called "brigants" of south Italy who fought against Garibaldi. They were farmers, they were poor, they were supersticious, believers and very faithful to the pope. South Italy didn't want the unification and they became always poorer also because north Italy had taken all the money of the banks of south Italy. They did a kind of revolution, helped by the Pope and by the army of Francis II, king of the Two Sicilies, but they werent' real fighters and they were killed.


The concept of being 'touched by God/gods' has existed (exists) in many cultures and is not specific to Russia. It is just that Russia at this time was very backward and its people were notoriously superstitious. Epileptics and Schizophrenics were often thought to be so 'touched' because they sometimes went into trances and had hallucinations, which seemed like visions. Before people understood mental illness (or attempted to) one way of dealing with it was to become a shaman, a fortuneteller or 'soothsayer'. In the past (and today in some places) people with unusual lifestyles, like artists and musicians, were often deemed 'mad' just because they were different and did not behave conventionally.

Till now I have read about this only in Russian books so I thought it was something of Russian or Orthodox religion.
Thanks also for the informations about the two composers, didn't know anything about them.


message 10: by MadgeUK (last edited Oct 12, 2012 01:19PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 86 comments Some people would behave like beasts whether they were idealists or not. Horrible murders are taking place every day in our democratic, non-revolutionary societies. Revolutions and change would not happen without ideals. Non-violence can only achieve so much and Ghandi's non-violence ended in the bloodbath of the partition of India because he did not resolve the religious question - although he was not to blame for that.

Whether or not you believe that the unification of Italy was a good thing, Garibaldi certainly was a revolutionary and conducted many daring guerrilla raids. The red shirts of his volunteers were the forerunners of the red shirts worn by the Soviets and other revolutionaries since then. He speech to his troops in 1860 was a stirring call to arms:-

http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/...

He was an inspiration to the founders of the Russian Revolution and he regularly visited Taganrog, Russia in the 1830s. In 1961 the city honoured him by erecting an obelisk to him, a 5-meter high stella representing a flying banner. The inscription on it, written by Frederic Engels, reads: In 1833, Giuseppe Garibaldi took an oath of dedicating his life to liberation and unification of his Homeland – Italy. Under leadership of the national hero Giuseppe Garibaldi, the country was liberated and unified. In the person of Garibaldi Italy had a hero of antique kind, who was capable of producing miracles and who produced miracles.


message 11: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 86 comments This is Tchaivosky's most famous ballet:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phmIpa...

And from Stravinsky's Firebird:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EC6Mmm...


message 12: by dely (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments MadgeUK wrote: "Some people would behave like beasts whether they were idealists or not. Horrible murders are taking place every day in our democratic, non-revolutionary societies. Revolutions and change would not happen without ideals."

Yes, I understand what you mean but I also think that the same people, not blinded by ideals, would not be beasts. I refer always to the book I am reading: if two persons are friends and neighbors, one of them begins to follow some ideals and blinded by them he kills his friend. Also if we have some ideals we should never lose control of our human side. It seems to me that some people change behavior only when they start to follow some ideals and before they were normal people, not murderers. My opinion is that a revolution and a war should not change people; it's because of this that I say that people should not get blinded by ideals. Always referring to "Quiet flows the Don", I am loving it so much because it shows the human side of people. There were Bolsheviks who followed their ideals but they were merciful with the prisoners and this because they didn't lose their human side; and we can say the same with the fighters of the white army. So, I don't say that ideals are bad, but normal people who suddenly get angry and blinded by them is the dangerous side of ideals. My opinion is that sometimes ideologies change the persons and this should not happen.
I think that the main difference in our opinions is that for you the persons, with or without ideals, are always the same: good or bad. Instead I think that sometimes ideals can change people and good people can turn bad.

Didn't know that the Soviets had the red shirts because of Garibaldi. Didn't know he was known or he was considered a hero outside Italy. I am not for or against the unification of Italy but it happened for the wrong reasons in the wrong period. Italy wasn't ready for it, the folk was not ready, there were too many differences between north and south and also now there is some hate between people of north Italy and people from the south. And this because they decided to unificate Italy for their political and economical reasons without thinking about the folk. He has unified Italy, the land, but not the folk.

Thanks for the links of the videos!


George | 58 comments There's a Russian term to describe a crazy person that is also touched by God - yurodivyi (blessed or fool for Christ). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yurodivy


George | 58 comments The famous St. Basil's Cathedral on the Red Square (a trademark of Russia) is also called the Cathedral of Basil the Blessed. It refers to the fact that Basil was that type of the Saint - yurodivyi or blessed.


message 15: by MadgeUK (last edited Oct 13, 2012 10:55PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 86 comments Thanks George - I forgot to mention the 'holy fools' tradition, which exists in all 3 of the monotheistic religions. St Basil's is a crazy looking building!

http://www.pbase.com/bmcmorrow/moscow...

In the UK we also use the word 'touched' to describe someone who is slightly mad and 'touch' is also used to describe the act of conning money from someone, both of which stem from the idea of a person being 'touched by God'.


message 16: by dely (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments George wrote: "There's a Russian term to describe a crazy person that is also touched by God - yurodivyi (blessed or fool for Christ). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yurodivy"

Thanks George, very interesting!

I have still 200 pages to read and then I have finished the whole epic!
Once finished "Quiet flows the Don" I wanted to continue to read about Russian history, something that talks about the history after the Civil War and I have found this: Life and Fate by Vasily Grossman.
Do you know it? Do you have other suggestions of which books I could read?


message 17: by MadgeUK (last edited Oct 14, 2012 03:41AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 86 comments How about Ten Days that Shook the World by John Reed, an American journalist who took part in the Revolution:-

http://www.amazon.com/Ten-Days-That-S...

http://www.amazon.com/Days-Shook-Worl...

There is also a DVD of the film which was based on Reed's experiences:-

http://www.amazon.com/Reds-Special-25...

Life and Fate is a very long book which was serialised earlier this year on BBC Radio 4:-

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/features/...


message 18: by dely (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments MadgeUK wrote: "How about Ten Days that Shook the World by John Reed, an American journalist who took part in the Revolution:-

http://www.amazon.com/Ten-Days-That-S...

http://www.amazon.com/..."


Thanks! I have already found the Italian edition and added it to my to-read list.
I prefer to read first the book but then I will watch also the film.


George | 58 comments To Dely: I haven't read Grossman yet. I believe that book is about the Great Patriotic War (what the Russians call WW II on the Eastern Front). There are very many books dedicated to that - to the struggles of the Russian and other Soviet people during the War. I myself have not read too many of those. I can look up the books and post the list here.


George | 58 comments To MadgeUK: Yes. That's a very famous account of the Russian Revolution from an American's point of view.


George | 58 comments What first comes to mind is another one of Sholokhov's novels - The Fate of a Man that I believe is about the GPW.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42...


George | 58 comments Vasilev B. The Dawns Here Are Quiet ...

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12...


George | 58 comments Moment Of Truth A Novel And Two Stories
by Vladimir Bogomolov

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/97...


George | 58 comments The Living And The Dead: A Novel
by Konstantin Simonov

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/65...


George | 58 comments Tyorkin & the stovemakers; (Translations)
by Aleksandr Tvardovsky

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/54...


George | 58 comments Front Line Stalingrad
by Viktor Nekrasov

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10...


George | 58 comments A Story about a Real Man
by Boris Polevoi

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29...


George | 58 comments The Young Guard
by Alexander Fadeyev

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/63...


George | 58 comments They Fought for Their Country
by Mikhail Sholokhov

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12...


George | 58 comments These are the most famous books about WW II from the Russian/Soviet point of view. Some of them are really great!


message 33: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 86 comments Gosh - you could have put them all in one post George:)

I think it is very difficult to find an unbiased book about the Revolution and its aftermath:( So many are written by those with 'an axe to grind', usually a virulent anti-communist axe.


George | 58 comments There's quite a few that are pro...Especially written by the Russian authors of the time.
To get the complete picture you need to study all sides of course.


message 35: by dely (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments George wrote: "To get the complete picture you need to study all sides of course."

I agree, this is also my opinion. And it is one of the reasons why I am liking "Quiet flows the Don": Sholokhov is neutral and the reader can take his decisions.
I am near the end and till now I hadn't a favorite character or a character who I disliked but now I am really hating Miska Koscevoj because I can't stand people like him.

Thanks for this long list of books! I hope only that some of them have been translated also in Italian. Though I sometimes read English books, I always prefer to read them in my native language. You have also seen how difficult it was to find the complete edition of Quiet Flows the Don seen that here it was out of print since a lot of decades!
Thanks a lot ;)


George | 58 comments I'm glad I can help! I really want to read some of those books myself.

Also worth mentioning is that some of the contemporary Russian prose is often times a postmodern version of an original work of the earlier time.

For example Victor Pelevin's Buddha's Little Finger (Chapaev and Pustota) is a postmodern version of Dmitiri Furmanov's Chapaev.

Sergei Minaev's Duhless: A Story about an Unreal Man is an allusion to Boris Polevoi's A Story about a Real Man.


George | 58 comments Thus by reading the original classical Russian prose we can better understand the contemporary Russian prose.


message 38: by MadgeUK (last edited Oct 14, 2012 11:00AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 86 comments Sholokhov is neutral and the reader can take his decisions.

Sholokhov isn't neutral - he fought for the Bolsheviks in the Civil War and during WWII wrote for several newspapers praising the Soviet war effort. He was a leading member of the Communist Party and was twice awarded the Hero of Socialist Labour prize. These events are bound to colour his novels.


message 39: by dely (last edited Oct 14, 2012 11:37AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments George wrote: "Thus by reading the original classical Russian prose we can better understand the contemporary Russian prose."

Unfortunately a lot of these books are out of print. I can't find, for example, Buddha's Little Finger :/


MadgeUK wrote: "Sholokhov is neutral and the reader can take his decisions.

Sholokhov isn't neutral - he fought for the Bolsheviks in the Civil War and during WWII wrote for several newspapers praising the Soviet..."


Have you read "Quiet flows the Don"?
In the book he doesn't sympathize for one party or the other so, in this book, he is neutral.
He talks about the events and how people live them; he talks about the beautiful landscape of the steppe; he talks above all about the emotions: love, fear, survival and these were on one side and also the other. This is a book about human beings, regardless if red or white.
Indeed, sometimes it seems to me that he sympathizes for the Cossacks who fought against the reds.


message 40: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 15, 2012 01:11AM) (new)

dely wrote: "MadgeUK wrote: "Sholokhov is neutral and the reader can take his decisions.

Sholokhov isn't neutral - he fought for the Bolsheviks in the Civil War and during WWII wrote for several newspapers praising the Soviet..."

Have you read "Quiet flows the Don"?
In the book he doesn't sympathize for one party or the other so, in this book, he is neutral.
He talks about the events and how people live them; ...


You know, there are series of scandals connected to the novel. There are disputes surrounding Sholokhov's authorship, his firm integration into the Communist establishment from Stalin to Brezhnev, his political kowtowing and his betrayal of the unwritten writer's code of honor when he rudely attacked dissidents from a Party tribune etc, etc but they still can't seriously harm the status of "Quiet flows the Don". It's so good that I'm actually considering it can replace "War and Peace" as the most weighty foundation epic of Soviet civilization. With what I've read so far it's neutral so agree with Dely

However I see Madge point as well, the writer as the person perhaps not always agreeable as the art he/she produces. Sholokhov is not somebody I get completely, then perhaps that's because I haven't read much of his work.


George wrote: "Thus by reading the original classical Russian prose we can better understand the contemporary Russian prose."

George, thanks for all those books! And I thought I've read a lot! :)

And what you're saying is something we talk here often and I'm guessing you read the translations as well as the original? Who's the best translator of the classics according to your point of view: Garnett, PV or somebody else?


message 41: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 15, 2012 01:39AM) (new)

dely wrote: "I know Tchaikovsky and Stravinksy only by name because I don't like a lot operas so I don't know about their "mads". Can you make me some examples? ..."


I don't know that much details but famous Russian composers like Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky and had been seen to fall victim to 'fits of madness' and depression. I'm not sure what they exactly mean by 'fits of madness' perhaps mood disorders and Stravinsky according to what I've read seemed to suffer more with "up"s manic episodes than depressed ones. But as somebody has said up there, it may be, has nothing to do with just Russian culture.

Handel, Schumann and Mozart, they all suffered with something. Two famous examples of composers whose depression led to suicide are Clarke and Warlock. ( and yes, I love classical music :)

Clarke and Warlock's stories are like the one's of Vincent van Gogh and Sylvia Plath.


message 42: by MadgeUK (last edited Oct 15, 2012 01:59AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 86 comments It may have been called 'madness' (insanity) in the 19C but people with depression or bi-polar disorders are not called 'mad' nowadays. If they were, 350 million people would be deemed mad in the world today:-

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/n...

Homosexuality was also thought to be a mental illness but the majority of psychiatrists do not agree with that diagnosis today.


George | 58 comments In regards to the discussion above, Sholokhov indeed was not neutral in his political sympathies. This is understandable as at that time one either openly embraced the new way of life or didn't. Him having come from a lower class it's understandable which side he chose and embraced.
He is however neutral in describing both sides of the conflict in the book and makes you sympathize with both at times. As I mentioned before it's even very strange that he got such a praise and was awarded all those Prizes considering that the book is very anti-Soviet in some parts.


George | 58 comments To Shanez: I couldn't answer your question about the translators unfortunately. I read in Russian.


George | 58 comments Dely, did you mean Buddha's Little Finger is out of print in English or Italian? I'm pretty sure it's widely available in English. I highly recommend it but not before one reads Furmanov's Chapaev, watches the old Soviet film by the same name or learns who Chapaev was. :)


message 46: by Amalie (last edited Nov 06, 2012 05:19PM) (new)

Amalie  | 650 comments Mod
George wrote: "These are the most famous books about WW II from the Russian/Soviet point of view. Some of them are really great!"

George, thank you for all the book links ! More books for the group shelf. I once tried "Hot Snow" by Yuri Bondarev, didn't finish it though, those who are interested in the topic of Russian culture, "madness" and religion, perhaps, might like the following:

Understanding Russia: The Holy Fool In Russian Culture

Diagnosing Literary Genius: A Cultural History of Psychiatry in Russia, 1880-1930


message 47: by dely (last edited Oct 15, 2012 06:09AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments George wrote: "Dely, did you mean Buddha's Little Finger is out of print in English or Italian? I'm pretty sure it's widely available in English. I highly recommend it but not before one reads Furmanov's Chapae..."

Yes, in Italian. In the end, if there is no Italian edition available, I must read it in another language because I have heard really good things about Buddha's Little Finger. And thanks for the advice about Chapaev ;)


Shanez, me too, I am preferring The Don to War&Peace.


message 48: by dely (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments I have finished the whole epic! :D

What a wonderful book! It is a must read, absolutely.


George | 58 comments Congratulations!)


message 50: by dely (new) - rated it 5 stars

dely | 340 comments George wrote: "Congratulations!)"

Thanks! It was really a pleasant read, not at all hard or dragging despite the size.

I liked also the end. Nothing of this book has disappointed me.


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