Norwegian Wood Norwegian Wood discussion


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Norwegian Wood and the Great Gatsby

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message 1: by Moon's (new)

Moon's Soul I read one post stating that Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby is similar to Murakami's Norwegian Wood. What do you think of it?

http://allbooksaboutwomen.blogspot.be...


Marius Pontmercy My opinion:

Complete and utter over-interpretation. These two novels are as alike as two completely non-alike things.

The only link as far as I am concerned is that - yes - Watanabe at one moment is reading "the Great Gatsby" in the novel.


message 3: by Lily (last edited Sep 25, 2012 06:25AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lily Moon's wrote: "I read one post stating that Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby is similar to Murakami's Norwegian Wood. What do you think of it?Moon's Soul I read one post stating that Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby is similar to Murakami's Norwegian Wood. What do you think of it? ..."

We all make interpretations and linkages as we read, both to our own experiences and memories and to other media which we have encountered. I'm not sure most of us would make the connections this blogger does; still, I found it fun to read her (his?) perspective, since I like both books.

I looked for the identity of the blogger, but was unsuccessful.

This is another one of those glimpses at when does a text stand alone as delivered by a writer, to what extent was the writer influenced by other texts, and how is the text the reader receives alike or different from either of those.

Do take a look at some of the other reviews of this blogger and compare with your standards for good reviews, writing, thought, sentence structure -- all the criteria you bring to judging any writing.


Lurisse Ann There's nothing similar with these two novels. Completely different.. The only thing that binds them is when the character in Norwegian Wood reads a Gastby book.


message 5: by nil (last edited Feb 17, 2013 07:43PM) (new)

nil It may not be at first glance, but things rarely are anyways. From a deeper perspective, the character placements fall in nicely when you consider the engrossed love story of Norwegian Wood as a sexualized Gatsby. Sure, Norwegian Wood takes things on a more personal level and explores profound love upon layers and layers of hidden nuances; but in the end, the invading mysteries, the subtle uneasy atmosphere, and the all so close realism in its alienation -- these aspects stand out most to me when considering both works.

Murakami is a heavy Western reader (especially one of Dickens), and so it would only be logical to make such comparisons. At the very least, it's not something that be so easily dismissed as over-analysis or "over-interpretation"; in fact, I would argue that a lot of his works feel more closely ingrained with Western literature than Japanese literature.


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