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message 1: by Ira (new) - rated it 3 stars

Ira Therebel It is 2012 and the book was written in 2004. I am curious how is the progress of his idea going. I can't find much on my own, besides the site of Numenta and seeing that they areworking on something called Grok.

So anyone who knows more about intelligent machine development or neuroscience can tell me how it is moving forward? Did it make any important changes in how brain and AI are viewed? Are more people in those fields following these ideas? What has been proven wrong since then?


Marjan I think that the general idea (the cortex sharing the same pattern all over and that intelligence should be memory-recognition based) is pretty widely accepted, but we are far from understanding it. Some clues might lie in the chaos and emergence theory. Go to youtube to see Robert Sapolsky lecture on these two subjects (these:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_njf8j... and the next lecture). The best guess for IT we have so far lies in the direction Sapolsky takes at the end of the second lecture (no.22), where he speculates that it should emerge with large networks of computers... and you can see it happening; Google maps or Siri are taking 'intelligent' decisions by using large clouds of data that connects many different users. I hope this is a little helpful. I am not any expert on this subjects, but I did spent the whole summer reading about these things. ;)


Denise Cool. Thanks for the links.


message 4: by Ira (new) - rated it 3 stars

Ira Therebel Marjan wrote: "I think that the general idea (the cortex sharing the same pattern all over and that intelligence should be memory-recognition based) is pretty widely accepted, but we are far from understanding it..."

Thank you for the information! Even if you are not an expert as long as you are interested and follow it this was very helpful :)


Fred Beshears You may want to check out How to Create a Mind by Ray Kurzweil. His approach to pattern recognition is similar to Hawkins but since he now works for Google (I believe his title is Chief Technology Officer or something like that) he probably has the money and resources to apply his approach to develop Natural Language Understanding software that can scale. In How to Create ... he holds up IBM's Watson software as an important step toward creating a computer that can pass the Turing simulation test. So, it looks like Google, IBM and perhaps a few other major companies (and countries like China) are now in a race to develop natural language understanding software etc.


message 6: by Ira (new) - rated it 3 stars

Ira Therebel Fred wrote: "You may want to check out How to Create a Mind by Ray Kurzweil. His approach to pattern recognition is similar to Hawkins but since he now works for Google (I believe his title is Chief Technology ..."

thanks for the tip, i will check it out!


message 7: by Mkfs (new)

Mkfs Hawkins' approach at Numenta is to perform pattern matching in time (that is, on streams of data).

A fairly recent (2012) book by Paul Churchland,
Plato's Camera: How the Physical Brain Captures a Landscape of Abstract Universals, demonstrates how the brain actually performs this task.

It's a good read if you want to familiarize yourself with the brain functionality that Hawkins is trying to reproduce.


message 8: by Gamesbyjerry (last edited Apr 09, 2014 07:32PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Gamesbyjerry I'd also highlight Dr Dileep George's progress, who was previously Chief Technology Officer for Numenta.

His "Recursive Cortical Network" is based on visual perception. It was in the news in 2012 as having a larger than expected funding round, hinting at an impressive demonstration
http://www.kurzweilai.net/vicarious-a...

Then re-appeared in the public eye last year as having the ability to solve CAPTCHAs at least 90% of the time.

"George and Phoenix say the CAPTCHA demonstration is just that, and that its software can be used to solve other sensory perception and even reasoning problems. “We have solved other problems we’re not telling people about yet,” says George. The company plans to do other Turing tests as well." http://www.forbes.com/sites/roberthof...

Just stumbled on this new interview with Hawkins that has some very exciting news too!

""I am thrilled at the progress we're making," he told El Reg during a sunny afternoon at Numenta's whiteboard-crammed offices in Redwood City, California. "It's accelerating. These things are compounding, and it feels like these things are all coming together very rapidly."" http://www.theregister.co.uk/Print/20...


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