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The Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying and Start Making
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The Homemade Pantry > Aisle 1 (Dairy) & Aisle 2 (Cereals & Snacks)

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message 1: by Christine, FSC BOOK CLUB MODERATOR (last edited Sep 24, 2012 06:08AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Christine | 107 comments Mod
The Homemade Pantry starts off with a bang... HOME DAIRY! “What?!”, you may say. “I can make cheese and yogurt at home?!” (Unless you are already a home dairy expert, in which case, carry on... carry on.) Yes! YOU can make mozzarella. You can make butter. You can make yogurt.

A fair warning-- I think this entire book will blow your mind in that way. So many staples that we take for granted as being commercially produced, and Alana shows us how to make them ourselves. How to stock our pantries with homemade goods.

The second chapter covers cereals and snacks. I could live on cereals and snacks, couldn’t you? They are quick, easy and have helped me avoid many hunger-induced meltdowns and freakouts.

Here is your assignment: Pick a recipe from one of these chapters. Then take a photo of the finished product in action. Snap a picture of your bagel with homemade cream cheese or butter on it. Show us where you took your homemade granola or car snacks-- a quick bite on the road, a nibble in between meetings, etc. Tell us where you served your new arsenal of homemade party snacks. Invite people over to watch the game and serve them a batch of potato chips, mixed roasted nuts or jerky.

Upload your photos to this group (on the right-side toolbar, click “Photos” and then upload... tag with either “dairy” or “cereals&snacks”.) Post your photo on your Facebook page or right on From Scratch Club’s FB wall. Instagram and tweet us using the hastag #FSCBookClub. Blog about it. Pin it and add the photo to our FSC Book Club board on Pinterest.

And then stop back right here, and tell us about it. What did you make? How did it turn out? How did you use it? Tell us about where else you posted, if you like. Did you write about it on your food blog? Share the link. Start the discussion. Ask questions about the recipes. Share anecdotes or tips you learned in the process.

UPDATE: The wonderful Alana Chernila, author of our FSC Book Club selection, is monitoring the forum and is available to answer your recipe questions! Especially if you are diving into home dairy for the first time, please ask away if you are confused or not sure of a step. Alana will do her best to help you out :)

(Yes, you can make more than one recipe! Yes, you can sit this one out and just follow along with the discussion. Yes, you can post about it on some new social media site that I haven't even heard of yet. No, you don't have to post about it on Instagram/Twitter/Facebook/Pinterest if you have no idea what those things are.)


Corrina (corrinajane) | 15 comments Anybody know what they are going to make? I am still in the middle of unpacking my kitchen, but I am going to try to bust out some car snacks. We're taking a road trip this weekend, and it would be nice to have something healthier to munch on.


Casey (kcrose210) | 74 comments I am for sure gonna make some instant oatmeal for bringing to work. It sounds wonderful and so much better than those packets. I've made ricotta before but with a slightly different recipe so I may try that as well.


Corrina (corrinajane) | 15 comments Oh, I forgot about the instant oatmeal! Maybe I will try to make some of that, too. I've been bad at eating breakfast lately.


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

I may have to skip this first assignment because I am out of town this weekend and heading away for vacation next week, but I will see what others do with interest. Instant oatmeal sounds awesome


Markie | 9 comments I have a new hot air popcorn popper arriving today!!! I can't wait to start popping again!!! I've been buying popcorn since my old one broke but there's nothing like fresh popped corn!!! I'm looking forward to trying to make the Maple Popcorn!!!


message 7: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments I haven't read the snacks yet - but I read the Dairy last night and I'm trying to decide whether I have the nerve to try mozzarella. By coincidence, I made ricotta two weekends ago from another cookbook and it came out DELICIOUS (I had wonderful Guernsey milk from the farmers market, which didn't hurt any). So - fresh from that success, and fascinated by the ice cube trick Alana mentions in her recipe I'm pondering....


message 8: by Christine, FSC BOOK CLUB MODERATOR (new) - rated it 5 stars

Christine | 107 comments Mod
I'm making yogurt :) I scored a vintage (seriously) yogurt maker a few months ago and have only made one batch so far, but I think I'll have better luck with this recipe. I'd love to also whip up a batch of granola.

Remember, ask away if you have recipe questions!


Marilyn  (goodreadscommarilyn_zembo_day) | 25 comments I'm going to try the ricotta. Never made any before. Just bought whole milk so can do it (never have whole milk in house, always 1% or 2%). I thought you had to have rennet or some kind of "starter" for making ricotta, so this recipe surprised me. Might even try the creme fraiche, since I love the stuff. Maybe eventually will do the toaster pastries. Believe it or not, I made butter from scratch when in grade school. I don't remember which grade (hey-- I'm in my mid-60s!) but probably 5th or 6th. What I can recall is that the cream was in a jar and we shook it until it became butter... passing it between all the kids until it was "churned." We loved it and it was delicious.


message 10: by Cynthia (last edited Sep 26, 2012 10:18AM) (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments I was all revved up to make mozzarella, but then realized I have to order some ingredients. Darn! So I just spent a long time poring over the Cheese Queen's website (www.cheesemaking.com) and ordered everything I think I'll need for several of the items in Aisle 1 (Dairy). Unfortunately, I don't think they'll come by this weekend. So I might try out the instant oatmeal for this challenge (instant breakfast is a GREAT idea). We'll see!


message 11: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments Marilyn wrote: "Believe it or not, I made butter from scratch when in grade school. I don't remember which grade (hey-- I'm in my mid-60s!) but probably 5th or 6th. What I can recall is that the cream was in a jar and we shook it until it became butter... passing it between all the kids until it was "churned." We loved it and it was delicious."

Marilyn - that sounds like an experience my husband had. It is one of his very few pleasant memories of school and he still talks about it from time to time. In fact, he mentioned it when I happened across the butter recipe in the Homemade Pantry as I was reading the other night.


message 12: by Meg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Meg (megriffi) | 59 comments Hi FSC friends!

Yesterday I whipped up some ricotta. (Don't I sound like a pro?!)

I found the temperature regulation to be the most difficult - I think, perhaps, because I am working on an electric stove (which I have no love for). I had a few "tense moments" around giant bubbles erupting, but I made it through and ended up with some really delicious cheese. My partner and I had a friend over for dinner and we served it for dessert, topped with blueberries and honey. It was a hit!

I just posted a photo below and blogged about it in more detail over here: http://smallworldsupperclub.wordpress....

Enjoy!


Marilyn  (goodreadscommarilyn_zembo_day) | 25 comments Meg wrote: "Hi FSC friends!

Yesterday I whipped up some ricotta. (Don't I sound like a pro?!)

I found the temperature regulation to be the most difficult - I think, perhaps, because I am working on an electr..."


I'm a little worried since my stove is an electric one. As a matter of fact, it's a cooktop (ceramic?). When we remodeled the kitchen, I wanted it. It really looks great and just takes some getting used to. Still, sometimes I miss the gas. (Note: I intend to use the technique the author notes a page or two later than than the ricotta recipe, taking an ice cube and rubbing it across the bottom of the Dutch oven. Hopefully that will lend a little insurance against burning it!


message 14: by Kizzi (new)

Kizzi | 6 comments Corrina wrote: "Anybody know what they are going to make? I am still in the middle of unpacking my kitchen, but I am going to try to bust out some car snacks. We're taking a road trip this weekend, and it would ..."
I've made one of the car snack recipes so I'm going to try the second one this time. It has been tough to find brown rice syrup for some reason. For dairy I am going to try butter. I don't think I'm ready for the cheese yet!


Susan M | 42 comments My plan for next week is making savory toast pastries with ricotta and spinach. This weekend I will use my time to read both recipes and gather ingredients that I need.


message 16: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments Why do I want to cook everything in this book? I think it's the stories and the beautiful pictures - and how each recipe is almost its own section in the book. It gives me time to think between recipes as I move through the book. (also so pleasantly amused by the chapters named after "Aisles", although I do so little shopping in big grocery stores anymore that it took a little while for that to detail to sink in).


message 17: by Meg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Meg (megriffi) | 59 comments Hi Marilyn! I think you should be fine, but I would just be much more vigilant about watching the stove. Good luck!


message 18: by Christine, FSC BOOK CLUB MODERATOR (new) - rated it 5 stars

Christine | 107 comments Mod
Meg wrote: "Hi FSC friends!

Yesterday I whipped up some ricotta. (Don't I sound like a pro?!)

I found the temperature regulation to be the most difficult - I think, perhaps, because I am working on an electr..."


Awesome post :) Doesn't cheesemaking feel completely victorious?!


message 19: by Christine, FSC BOOK CLUB MODERATOR (new) - rated it 5 stars

Christine | 107 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "My plan for next week is making savory toast pastries with ricotta and spinach. This weekend I will use my time to read both recipes and gather ingredients that I need."

Savory toast pastries?! Send some my way, please.


Corrina (corrinajane) | 15 comments Savory pastries is going in my mental bank.

Nutty Granola Bars are baking currently. First completely from-scratch thing I've made in our new kitchen. I used a liquid measuring cup for everything since it was all I could find...


message 21: by Meg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Meg (megriffi) | 59 comments Christine wrote: "Meg wrote: "Hi FSC friends!

Yesterday I whipped up some ricotta. (Don't I sound like a pro?! ..."


It sure does! I just polished off the rest of the ricotta....mmmm....


message 22: by Kim (new)

Kim | 1 comments I am going to make the maple popcorn and the toaster pastries. Seems like a great use for some of our homemade jam from the summer.

We're on a limited diet due to food allergies so pretty much all the diary is out for me :(. I am having cheese making envy in a serious way!


message 23: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments The book is invading my subconscious. Early this morning I had a dream that I had made toaster pastries and I was laying them out on long boards and carefully loading them into the back of the truck. Woke up to the sound of the rain (for real) and brain, still in dream mode, was momentarily worried that the wet would ruin the pastries in the open truck bed.

Toaster pastries? I didn't realize that recipe was even on the "maybe this is what I'll cook" list :-)


message 24: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments Okay. I wasn't going to make the mozzarella because I just ordered the rennet etc on Wednesday and could not imagine it would be here by this weekend. Guess what I just found in the mailbox? Wheee! (Excitement and - I confess - I see a few "tense moments" in my future). I'll report back later.


Susan M | 42 comments Cynthia wrote: "Okay. I wasn't going to make the mozzarella because I just ordered the rennet etc on Wednesday and could not imagine it would be here by this weekend. Guess what I just found in the mailbox? Wheee!..."

My daughter bought the rennet too a few weeks ago and she loved the mozzarella with rennet.


message 26: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments SUCCESS! I've uploaded two photos in the photo section. My most thrilling moment was at about second 28 of the 30 second stir after adding the rennet when suddenly the curds started to offer some real resistance to the spoon.


message 27: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments Well - I neglected to take my camera, but for "action" we ate one braid of the mozzarella immediately, and then we took the other one down to the volunteer fire department cookout at our friend David's house this evening. The mozzarella was a hit. David is a dairy farmer, so he wants us to come down some night soon and show him how to make the cheese. Says he'll supply the milk if we bring the rest of the stuff.


message 28: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 3 comments I make yogurt every week. We mix it into the dog's food; use it in smoothies; have it with fruit and honey; use it instead of sour cream; mix it into oatmeal to make it creamy, and just eat it mixed with jam, honey, or maple syrup. We get our culture from http://www.cheesemaking.com. I like the creamy culture and my husband likes the sweet culture, so we compromise...and use the sweet culture. :-) I always make plain and add the flavorings later, if wanted. I also add 1/4 cup powdered dry milk to the liquid milk. This makes the yogurt more "solid" and you get less whey accumulating in the jars as you use it.


message 29: by Meg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Meg (mcasebolt) Cynthia wrote: "Toaster pastries? I didn't realize that recipe was even on the "maybe this is what I'll cook" list :-) "

Probably just the cover photo invading your subconscious.


message 30: by Kate (new) - added it

Kate Hayner | 19 comments I'm away on vacation this week in a rented house so I'm pretty much only reading, not cooking too much but when I get back home I'm going to try yogurt and homemade granola. I'll have to double up on my cooking for the next two weeks.


message 31: by Tina (new)

Tina Jordan | 9 comments Ok so I wanted to do at least one recipe from each chapter. We'll see how long I can keep that up. I did the granola bars and made yogurt for the first time. My husband also had us buy extra milk to make Ricotta. We will see if that happens. The granola bars turned into a predominately melted chocolate flavor but I really liked it. Now for the yogurt. My first batch never thickened up but it did smell cultured. Trying to evaluate what happened I thought even as I was getting it into the cooler with towels that it didn't feel warm enough to me. So for batch two I did a few different things. I upped the heating temperature to 190; only cooled it down to 115 and then I took a hint from Food in Jars and filled my cooler with 122 degree water when I put in the Jars in the cooler. Results, 7 hours later I had perfect yogurt. So I guess I wanted to remind everyone that this organic process of experimentation sometimes fails. I think that is not only the beauty of cooking but particularly things like a homemade pantry item. Commerical food production strives for consistency. Us human beings aren't always going to get consistency but we'll probably get something great. Even if it is only a chance to try again.


Susan M | 42 comments Gina wrote: "Just finished the butter. I use a KitchenAid Pro 600, the giant honking mixer, and started with the paddle. After about 6 minutes of paddle at med/high speed, I had no joy - just slightly bubbly ..."

sounds great Gina! I wonder how the low fat buttermilk will work. I will have to try the low fat next time I purchase.


message 33: by Christine, FSC BOOK CLUB MODERATOR (new) - rated it 5 stars

Christine | 107 comments Mod
Amanda wrote: "I tried the granola recipe last weekend (sans coconut) and it was fantastic. The whole house smelled great and it is delicious - I did trim it in half though. Can't. Stop. Munching. On. It."

Ohh the granola! I hope to make some of that soon to go with my homemade yogurt!


message 34: by Christine, FSC BOOK CLUB MODERATOR (new) - rated it 5 stars

Christine | 107 comments Mod
Kim wrote: "I am going to make the maple popcorn and the toaster pastries. Seems like a great use for some of our homemade jam from the summer.

We're on a limited diet due to food allergies so pretty much ..."


You are in good company with food allergy concerns, Kim. Several FSC contributors are in the same boat- it will be interesting to read about your adaptations with some of these recipes :)


message 35: by Meg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Meg (megriffi) | 59 comments I'll also be tackling the instant oatmeal this week. Gina-thanks for the tip on TJ's freeze dried blueberries. I'll have to check those out next time I'm over there.

I'm also really enjoying everyone's photos! Keep the food porn coming!


Casey (kcrose210) | 74 comments I made the instant oatmeal over the weekend and will post pic when I try it tomorrow morning. I also tackled ricotta last night in preperation for our Monday pizza night. It came out great, so I am hoping to get some great pictures of it in action tonight! Will keep you all posted. Those chocolate bars look delicious!


message 37: by Celia (new)

Celia | 21 comments I made creme fraiche (sorry--too lazy to look up the accent codes). I've done it before, so I'm really just cheating this time around. I also make yogurt regularly, though I don't use a thermophilic culture so I didn't use the recipe in the book for that one. :) Culturing things is so fun. I'm considering the instant oatmeal next, but I'm not sure I'll have time. (I just got home from being out of town.)


Marilyn  (goodreadscommarilyn_zembo_day) | 25 comments I'm so excited-- the whey is draining from the curds for ricotta even as I type! It smells so good I want to dip into now, but will be patient. I want to bring a small bit of it (how much can I give up?) to my friend Mary later on, if she's home, for a critique from a real Italian-American perspective. At a recent writing group gathering, when I told her about what I was doing, she told me that when she and her husband Kevin lived in Moracco back in the early 70s (Vietnam era & he was stationed there), she couldn't get Italian cheeses very often (if at all) so she learned to make them - but hasn't done so in years.


message 39: by KitchenNinja (new)

KitchenNinja | 37 comments I made the Nutella toaster pastries -- very awesome! I've posted about it on my blog: http://yankee-kitchen-ninja.blogspot....

If you have never made ricotta or butter before, I encourage you to try either -- very easy and very rewarding!


Susan M | 42 comments Ricotta making today was a success! I thought that it would have a lemony taste to it but it didn't. It is so delicious. I made it full fat....whole milk, cream, lemon juice and salt. I am very happy with the results and it tastes so much better than what you buy. My only problem is going to be the expense when I need 2 pounds of it to make gnocchi or spinach and ricotta ravioli. :-) Another day this week I want to make the Toaster pastries. One will be savory with ricotta, baby spinach, nutmeg. Second one will be with my homemade raspberry jam filling.


message 41: by Susan (last edited Oct 02, 2012 08:18AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Susan M | 42 comments Kitchen wrote: "I made the Nutella toaster pastries -- very awesome! I've posted about it on my blog: http://yankee-kitchen-ninja.blogspot....

If you have never made ricotta ..."


Ninja, you are right it is rewarding to make something from scratch. Your pastries look great and I love that you made your own shape...round!


Susan M | 42 comments Marilyn wrote: "I'm so excited-- the whey is draining from the curds for ricotta even as I type! It smells so good I want to dip into now, but will be patient. I want to bring a small bit of it (how much can I giv..."

Your Italian friend will kiss you for it. :-) As I am also Italian, I have to say that homemade is soooo much over the top than what we can buy in the stores.


message 43: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments Aisle 2 - Snacks. This one isn't quite as triumphant as the mozzarella but here’s a report.

I decided to try the potato chips. Going into it, I knew I had at least two strikes against me. You may remember from my introduction that we cook with wood. So.....

1) There is no setting the temperature to anything specific or simply changing it mid-bake. You have to aim at the idea of a temperature and stoke the firebox accordingly.
2) Our oven has only one shelf.

Still - I do pretty well with a lot of things so I was game to give it a try. I heated the oven up nice and hot (there is a temperature gauge on the front of the door that at least resembles the temperature inside) and figured I just wouldn’t add any more wood while they baked. And that I’d check them often and turn the pan around from time to time.

I had some sweet potatoes that needed to be used, so, deciding to add even more danger to the experiment, I sliced up one of those and two regular potatoes. (I’m re-reading Alana’s story about potatoes – the strangest thing in the garden. Both the potatoes and the sweet potatoes I was using were grown locally, but not in our garden. I have not tried potatoes yet, knowing that I do not have time to keep the bugs off and I won’t spray them).

So I oiled up the pan and the potato slices and put them in the nice hot oven. In about fifteen minutes a few of them were perfect (I guess the oven was a little hotter than I thought). I took them off - we ate them immediately and happily – and I turned the pan and put it back in.

But from there things went downhill. The slices were getting done one or two at a time, and those were getting overdone before the next one or two were ready. I didn’t want to open the door too often and cool the oven down too fast, but then I’d check on them and several of them would be well overdone – but the rest still not ready.

Strike 3 may have been that I was trying to do this at the same time that I was making paneer for an Indian dish we were cooking with friends that night (why not? I’m a cheesemaker now, right?), as well as assembling all the ingredients and tools we were taking to their house.

BUT….I really think the biggest problem was none of the above. I think it was that my mandoline didn’t necessarily cut very evenly (I've hardly used it, but I bought it a couple years ago, highly rated by a prestigious cooking magazine). My slices ranged from tissue paper thin to a very solid 1/16 inch. I think I need to work on my pressure. (As a side note: the mandoline REALLY didn't like cutting through the skin of the sweet potato - it kept clogging up).

So today I was fantasizing about using a vegetable peeler to make long curly strands, of a nice even thickness, and roasty toasting those by the above method - at a time when I can more easily pay close attention. In the meantime, we enjoyed even the overcooked chips with the exception of only a few that were really beyond saving. And the few really thin perfect ones were a truly delightful treat.


message 44: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments Marilyn wrote: "I want to bring a small bit of it (how much can I give up?) to my friend Mary later on, if she's home, for a critique from a real Italian-American perspective."

Marilyn - I hope you will report on your friend's critique!


message 45: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments I have a question about cheese.

I used raw whole milk for my mozzarella. I followed the instructions exactly as I would have if I were using pasteurized milk from the store. Do I need to do anything different if using raw milk (from a food safety perspective)? I noticed that one website said to pasteurize it first (which I think means heating it to 190).

I did not worry about this on this first try, because I knew it would all be eaten within an hour or two, and I am familiar with the dairy it came from and know them to be conscientious.

I am always VERY careful with raw milk and assume that, unless the cheese recipe included heating above 190 at some point, I would need to be similarly meticulous with cheese made from raw milk - perhaps even more so since it had been heated somewhat, thus possibly allowing some things to get a start.

Does anyone here know more about this than my broad guesses and assumptions?


message 46: by Cynthia (new) - added it

Cynthia | 68 comments Wendy wrote: "This makes the yogurt more "solid" and you get less whey accumulating in the jars as you use it. ."

Another method to reduce the whey accumulation is to smooth out the top of the yogurt in the container after serving before you put it away. It seems that the whey flows from the areas that stick up into any valleys that were created by spooning some out. I learned this trick from my mom and it works great. Might be tricky if you have to train a whole family to do it - in my case I'm the only one in the house who thinks yogurt is an edible substance, and in mom's case Dad also loves order so they are both rigorous about doing it.


message 47: by Meg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Meg (megriffi) | 59 comments I just finished a bowl of warm, delicious oatmeal! The recipe couldn't be easier and the result couldn't be more satisfying on a rainy day. :)

I halved the recipe, since there are only two of us and I wasn't sure how quickly we'd go through it (although I think perhaps it will be gone quite soon!). I topped it with just a bit of maple syrup (I couldn't resist) and I think dried fruit would add some more flavor, texture, and nutrition to it. All in all, I was quite pleased!

If you're curious, I blogged about it over at www.smallworldsupperclub.wordpress.com. Enjoy!


message 48: by Marilyn (last edited Oct 03, 2012 07:33AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Marilyn  (goodreadscommarilyn_zembo_day) | 25 comments Mary wasn't going to be home when I could stop by, which turned out to be not a bad thing since I'm using up all the ricotta that I made! Last night I made a recipe called Ricotta with Nutmeg and Peas that I found in an old cookbook on my shelves, THE BEST 125 MEATLESS PASTA DISHES by Minday Toomay & Susann Geiskopf-Handler (1992, Prima Publishing). It turned out delicious! My husband, son and daughter (Kristen was over for dinner) loved it (Kris took some home with her). This morning I put together mise en place to make Lemon Ricotta Pancakes, a recipe from BAKING BY FLAVOR by Lisa Yockelson (2002, John Wiley & Sons). Unfortunately, I might be the only one eating them "fresh" since Bill is now at Still Point fixing a water leak and Adrian may or may not be out all day. Guess that's what a microwave is for...

Making the ricotta was easy enough, except I had a slight problem toward the end while waiting for temp to rise to highest temperature. It did start to boil yet temp wasn't high enough after few minutes noted. Couldn't seem to adjust cooktop to get it just right at first. And I think I didn't have thermometer attached far enough into pan? Believe it or not, though I've owned a candy thermometer for a few years, this is first time I've used it!

Still, it worked out great. Tastes wonderful. But it's definitely not as creamy as the storebought stuff. Should it be? When the author described the end product as "curds and whey" she caught it exactly. It was even firmer after refrigeration. No problem with taste. Will definitely make it again.

Took pictures, which I will post on my blog with next entry and will upload on this site too. Here's link to today's entry, in which I mention From Scratch Club and, at the end, talk about our assignment: http://www.kitchencauldron.wordpress.com. Right now, I have a huge pot of stock on the stove upstairs, which I need to attend to!


Susan M | 42 comments First of all lets talk Pie Crust: For 30+ years I have been using a pie crust recipe which is a “fool proof” recipe. The ingredients included shortening, cider vinegar and egg. Although that recipe was easy and good tasting but I wanted a more flaky crust. So I decided about a month ago to try Martha Stewart’s pie crust recipe which called for butter and not shortening and really I was won over with her recipe versus the one I have been using. Alena if you are following our club and reading from the members here, please know that YOUR pie crust recipe is from now on my “go for” and favorite recipe to use. The dough rolled out easy with no cracks along the edges, a problem I always had. I believe the vinegar is the key to success. Anyone who is pie crust challenged should try this recipe and make it an addition to their recipe file.

So, today I mixed the ricotta with chopped baby spinach, salt and pepper to taste and a few gratings of nutmeg and made a couple of these savory toaster pastries. My lunch today was one with a nice mixed green salad....HEAVEN. With the rest of the dough I made raspberry filled (my homemade jam) and a couple of fig filled for Hubby. Scraps did not go to waste. I do what my mother always did with her scraps.....roll out dough, sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar, cut into long strips, roll up and bake.....YUM. We use to fight over those scrap cinnamon rolls. :-)

I really enjoyed these two chapters. I have visions of different variations of the toaster pastries and look forward to more fun in the kitchen.


Alana Chernila | 17 comments Cynthia wrote: "I have a question about cheese.

I used raw whole milk for my mozzarella. I followed the instructions exactly as I would have if I were using pasteurized milk from the store. Do I need to do anyth..."


Hi Cynthia, (Alana here!) Raw milk is great for making mozzarella, and in my experience, there's not much of a difference except that it just makes better cheese! There are many different opinions out there about raw milk and safety, but in this case, my feeling is that if you feel good about the safety of drinking raw milk in the first place, making mozzarella from it isn't much different. There's no culturing or leaving the cheese out on the counter at room temperature. Hope that answers your question? Just let me know- I'm happy to talk about it a bit more.


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