Goodreads Ireland discussion

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message 1: by Richard (new)

Richard Sutton (richardsutton) Can any Irish speaker give me a Anglicized, phonetic pronunciation for the phrase "Cuardartheora i gcrannaibh", which is loosely translated as "seeker in the trees". I'm looking to create a name for the ancient learned druids that served a clan, not the high druids, based upon Irish Gaelic. Any suggestions would be really appreciated!


message 2: by [deleted user] (last edited Sep 23, 2012 01:07PM) (new)

I've never seen that first word or anything like it, Richard. My Irish is of a phrasebook standard, but I'd guess along the lines of kwur-dar-hy'or i grann'iv.

I wish I could offer more help than that.

The group's resident expert on ancient Irish history is J.S. Dunn. If any member could help you with this it'll probably be him.


message 3: by Richard (new)

Richard Sutton (richardsutton) The first word translates to Seekers or Searchers but J.S. is a friend, so I will do just that!


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

I wish I could have helped more.


message 5: by Richard (new)

Richard Sutton (richardsutton) You helped a lot! I found another one that might be easier for readers, but JS ran a derivation search and found it came after the Latin, which meant it was never heard in Ireland at least, before Padraig! Back to square one.


message 6: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Rockefeller (laurelarockefeller) Is there actually a decent English-Gaelic DICTIONARY anyone can recommend?


I tried putting in a few lines of Gaelic into "Ghosts of the Past" but do not trust the results I received from google translate. I've tried some of the online translation sources. I would prefer an actual, regular dictionary so I can be sure of accuracy!


message 7: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 26, 2013 12:48PM) (new)

I always use this dictionary.

It gives examples on usage of whatever words you search. There maybe some potential pitfalls with the use of prepositions. For example the iris for 'I like' is is maith liom and 'you like' is is maith leat. Liom meaning with me.

If you're familiar with that aspect of Irish the website I recommended will be fine. If you really want a regular dictionary I used the older version of this one at school English-Irish Dictionary With Terminological Additions and Corrections by Tomás de Bhaldraithe . I always found it useful. Some friends of mine who went on to study Irish use the Collins Irish dictionary, and find it praiseworthy.


message 8: by Bernie (last edited Mar 26, 2013 02:06PM) (new)

Bernie I have never seen it like that but this is how I would say it kour ( as in tour) -tor (as in or) -ah i grawn (as in lawn) -ive.
Kour - tor - ah i grawn - iv

Geailge can be tricky because the grammar is complicated. As in French, nouns can be male or female and change in sentences depending on a variety of factors. You can'nt go wrong with Declan's dictionary suggestion but I do'nt know will it help with old Irish.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Bernie wrote: "I have never seen it like that but this is how I would say it kour ( as in tour) -tor (as in or) -ah i grawn (as in lawn) -ive.
Kour - tor - ah i grawn - ive"


Actually, I should have sought your opinion or recommended your expertise. Wasn't you who made the groups only Irish-language nomination, Bernie.


message 10: by Bernie (new)

Bernie Declan wrote: "Bernie wrote: "I have never seen it like that but this is how I would say it kour ( as in tour) -tor (as in or) -ah i grawn (as in lawn) -ive.
Kour - tor - ah i grawn - ive"

Actually, I should ..."


Declan wrote: "Bernie wrote: "I have never seen it like that but this is how I would say it kour ( as in tour) -tor (as in or) -ah i grawn (as in lawn) -ive.
Kour - tor - ah i grawn - ive"

Actually, I should
I speck the language fluently but I am not an expert on the written word. I lost a lot of it when I moved to England and I am only getting back to it now. That is why I am reading Irish books and taking lessons at the moment. But thanks for the vote of confidence.



message 11: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 26, 2013 03:10PM) (new)

Bernie wrote:"I speck the language fluently but I am not an expert on the written word. I lost a lot of it when I moved to England and I am only getting back to it now. That is why I am reading Irish books and taking lessons at the moment. But thanks for the vote of confidence."

We get the occasional request from a group member about Irish translation, and if it's anything beyond the common phrases used at school, I wouldn't feel confident doing it. You would recognise I well translated phrase that would be outside of my comfort zone.


message 12: by Bernie (new)

Bernie Declan wrote: "Bernie wrote:"I speck the language fluently but I am not an expert on the written word. I lost a lot of it when I moved to England and I am only getting back to it now. That is why I am reading Iri..."I will try and help when I can.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

If people don't come straight here for advice I'll refer them here. You'll be notified then when they ask their question.

Thanks, Bernie. :)


Shuhan [On Leave] (Inyourclosetinyourhead) I'd pronounce it Cuer(a little like cure...) de ha i pronounced i, not I. gran imh...


Shuhan [On Leave] (Inyourclosetinyourhead) sorry gran iv


message 16: by Katherine (new)

Katherine | 20 comments Depends on what irish dialect people have learned. I would have pronounced it gran IMHO because I learned Connacht Irish. There is more pronunciation on the latter part of the word in Connacht Irish and it is more guteral. Munster Irish is more on the start of the word.


message 17: by Katherine (new)

Katherine | 20 comments Sorry gran imh. Iv


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