The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1) The Fellowship of the Ring discussion


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message 1: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann I know that nothing can be the same as LOTR - and I'm not looking for anything to take its place. However, if anyone has any suggestions to help steer me towards other books with a similar flavor or other books that you've loved and would put in the same genre, then I'd love to hear about them.
Thanks!


message 2: by Mark (last edited Jan 15, 2008 12:02PM) (new)

Mark Victor You might consider reading LOTR in another language - and if you are very familiar with LOTR that will also make learning another language easier.


Meels I'm afraid that nothing is going to be quite LOTR for you. But, the Dragonlance Chronicles trilogy was good. There are a few books after that are nearly as good, eventually you get to the point that they are written by another author and they lose alot. Also, I enjoyed the Soveriegn Stone Trillogy by Weis and Hickman. I have heard that the Dragon Riders of Pern series is very good, but I haven't read them as yet. There are probably 10-15 books in the series. As I said, I haven't read them yet however, so I cannot say for sure that they are particularly good. Oh, and I did enjoy the Obsidian Chronicles. Let me reiterate that nothing in my opinion has ever lived up to Tolkien, but we all have to press on!

Lastly there was a series recommended to me on here that I recently picked up by George R.R. Martin called A Song of Ice and Fire. There are 4 books out and one on the way. I have not started it yet, but Time Magazine called him "The American Tolkien". So, I think that would be worth a try.


message 4: by Gwyneth (new)

Gwyneth I love the Martin books and I am a die hard Tolkien fan. I'm excited to try the Obsidian Chronicles you mentioned.


Enno Elizabeth Hayden's 'Rhapsody' trilogy is good.

there is a King Arthur triology by Stephen Lawhead which I found very good.


message 6: by Ben (last edited Jan 14, 2008 09:06AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ben There's also a great series by Terry Goodkind, beginning with Wizard's First Rule. The scope of his series has often been compared to rich world of Tolkein. I thoroughly enjoyed the books...the last few books in the series aren't as strong as the first few, but they're all good reads, regardless.


message 7: by Petros (new)

Petros I remember some years back, before the Return of the King movie came out, I saw on a Tolkien movie site, listed after the two old cartoons, a movie based on the book of someone who was said to have done an okay job writing about his own characters within Tolkien's Middle Earth setting. But the Elves in the pictures all had short hair, and the names didn't sound well construed - they sounded more like Klingon names.

Does anyone know what I'm talking about? I can't find anything on it now. There were claims that he had at least partial approbation from Christopher Tolkien (for the book, not the movie).


Lauren Try Robert Jordan's, Wheel of Time, series. Completely amazing! A similar feel to LOTR. There are currently 11 books to keep you entertained- with one more on the way!(The last one is being finished by Brandon, because Jordan passed away...) The New York Times says "Robert Jordan has come to dominate the world Tolkien began to reveal".


Dusty Nothing will replace the Lord of the Rings. However, if you want something EPIC, but don't mind changing genres & styles a bit:

Dune. Incredibly well developed, fascinating concepts, original, and intriguing. Sci-Fi.

The Count of Monte Cristo. Again - incredibly well developed, moving, interesting characters and situations. Classic.

Warning: all movie attempts at these have been awful, so if you've seen them, ignore them.


message 10: by Cyril (last edited Sep 27, 2008 07:31PM) (new)

Cyril The Sword of Shannara and its sequels (Terry Brooks) are very, very similar to LOTR, too similar for my taste but you might like it.

The Belgariad by David Eddings is a five-book series that's not too bad.

The original DragonLance series were pretty good, too.

I particulary liked Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series by Tad Williams, but its not for everybody.

Others:
The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant - Stephen Donaldson
The Dragonriders of Pern - Anne McCaffrey
The Riftwar Saga - Raymond Feist

I would stay away from the Wheel of Time series, at least until it's finished (post 8 points out that Robert Jordan died but that it may be completed by someone else). This series starts out strong (the first three books probably) but gets severely bogged down by tons of prose and characters.


message 11: by Kat (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kat Heatherington i'd echo the comment that Sword of Shannara etc are a complete rip-off of Tolkien (well, okay, Cyril didn't say that; i'm adding it), but for something of similar scope and depth, and of similarly excellent writing style, check out Guy Gavriel Kay's Fionavar Tapestry. There are three books in it, The Summer Tree, The Wandering Fire, and The Darkest Road. they're scintillating, brilliant and beautiful.

and i'll also echo the Pern recommendations; there are quite a lot of Pern books, and a few of them aren't quite up to the standard of the best ones, but in general they are very good. I'd start them with Dragonflight, Dragonquest, and The White Dragon, then the Harper Hall trilogy, then going back in time to Dragonsdawn, or Moreta. they make the most sense read in the order in which they were published, rather than in their own chronology. :D (this is because there are small internal inconsistencies that are resolved in order of writing/publication, but which have the ability to leap up and be glaring inconsistencies if you read Dragonsdawn first). I just re-read all 17 or so of them, including the ones she co-authored with her son, who is definitely not as good a writer nor as original a thinker, and overall i REALLY enjoyed hanging out in Pern for a few months. :)


message 12: by Meh (new) - rated it 3 stars

Meh Dude, any mass produced fantasy series like Forgotten Realms, Dragonlance, etc. They all rip off Tolkien. Wheel in Time is good for the first five books or so, then they get hugely plot-heavy. Read a couple of the Pern ones, if you've read three or four you've read them all. Read Belgariad by David Eddings, that's a good yarn, but all the other series by him are rewrites of the Belgariad, so don't bother. Terry Goodkind's a great writer, but fairly graphic. If you don't mind that, go for it. Same goes for George R.R. Martin. Great writing and story, but lots and lots of bloody details. Those are all the ones like Tolkien, but I recommend Charles de Lint as a great modern fantasy writer.


Melissa Dee I recommend The Kingkiller Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss. Absolutely epic. The characters, the plot, and especially the writing. All epic.

The world he creates is vivid and detailed. And charming. And mighty. And cruel. And delightful. And all of the things it sounds like you want in a book.

I hope you love it as much as I do if you read it.


Maureen Rue I loved The Sword of Shannara (Terry Brooks) almost as much as TLOTR. I know because I re-read it numerous times. Also really enjoyed the Belgariad series (David Eddings). Also re-read that series.


Lupine Estill The Sword of Truth series reminds me of it, although it isn't really all that similar.


message 16: by Tad (new) - rated it 5 stars

Tad Gardens of the Moon is the first book in the Malazan series. I've only read the first book so far but intend to read the rest of the series. It's a little darker than Lord of the Rings, but it has the same sort of world-building feel and depth. Some people recommend starting with the second book in the series. The first one kind of throws you right into the middle of things and it takes about half the book before you know all the characters. It's well worth the time though.

I second the recommendation of the Belgariad by David Eddings. I would add the Mallorean and Elenium series by him as well. They aren't quite as rich as LOTR, but they are a lot of fun.


Kathryn You might try some books by Guy Gavriel Kay. He worked on Tolkien's posthumously published works, and he deals mostly in historical-type stories retold in a high fantasy setting. I'd especially recommend Tigana.


Marko Guy Gavriel Kay gets my recommendation as well. Tigana was my first foray into his books and I still love it the best, but also Lions of Al-Rassan is excellent.

For a more traditional piece of fantasy, you might try his first foray into fantasy: The Fionavar Tapestry trilogy.


Tanja I really like the Nightrunners series by Lynn Flewelling


message 21: by Becky (last edited May 02, 2011 05:46AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Becky The Mistborn series by Brandon Sanderson is excellent. I would also recommend the Belgariad series by David Eddings. Of course, if you haven't read the dragon books byAnne McCaffrey you need to pick up Dragonflight immediately.


Destructo The Mad Um, almost every epic fantasy series written after LOTR was published? Tolkien cast a bloody big shadow.


Adela Bezemer-Cleverley I would suggest The Enchanted Forest Chronicles; although they lack the epicness, intensity, and drama of LOTR, they are a very entertaining read.


message 24: by Blue (new) - rated it 5 stars

Blue Ann wrote: "I know that nothing can be the same as LOTR - and I'm not looking for anything to take its place. However, if anyone has any suggestions to help steer me towards other books with a similar flavor ..."

My favourite after LOTR was the Riftwar Saga - Magician, Silverthorn and Darkness as Sethanon. Uniquie concept kinda and strong charactors. Was devistated when i finished Magician even though I knew there was more to come.


Evann I would recommend the Elvenbane series by I think Mercedes Lackey and someone else...anyway, it's a great series.


Devin I enjoyed the Golden Compass series by Phillip Pullman; though it's not quite LOTR, and of a somewhat lesser literary quality, I found the lead protagonist and central quest story of the books similiarly pleasing. "The Once and Future King" is another one I would recommend.


Carole Most of my favourites have already been mentioned, I would also recommend Robin Hobb- The Farseer Trilogy and The Tawny Man Trilogy.


Eulercauchy I agree with Devin. "The Once and Future King" by T.H. White is an astounding work.

That being said, The Black Company series by Glen Cook is absolutely amazing but isn't nearly as concerned with world building as Tolkien was. I don't think anything will come close to that series for me. Then again, there are no freaking elves.


message 29: by Lisa (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lisa I just finished The Children of Woden by Colin R. Claymore and really enjoyed it. Like Tolkien, he is very focused on establishing the creation of his world and its inhabitants. This book explores the creation of evil and the alliance of men compelled to fight it.


David I know my love of FOTR began years ago with a book that has inspired me all my life: John Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress. I used to read it through once a year. You will see Frodo in the man named Christian, and Samwise could be his companion Faithful. You could easily know Gandalf as Greatheart. You have the quest, the being misunderstood by family, everything along the way that tries to sidetrack him. For one of the earliest classics, this is one you shouldn't miss that inspired FOTR and many like it.


message 31: by Prerak (new) - added it

Prerak Well there is nothing that can ever take the place of LOTR for sure...but the thing is...there is this book series A song of Ice and Fire by George R R Martin and being frank...i havent found any book as epic and sooooo close to LOTR in terms of complexity in plot and real Fantasy...awesome and MUST READ!


Marina Fontaine Harry Potter has TONS of similarities. But if what you want is an adult fantasy series with decent world building, I have to go with my favorite- Sword of Truth by Terry Goodkind. You get your reluctant hero, your elderly wise wizard and some majorly evil villains.


message 33: by Joe (new) - rated it 5 stars

Joe Dratnol Right now one of my favorite series is Jim Butcher's series The Dresden Files. It is about a wizard in modern day Chicago. Excellently written! I look forward to every book.

The Sword of Truth series is great by Terry Goodkind.

Wheel of time is great, but very longwinded.

The original Dragonlance series was very enjoyable, it is wrtten by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman.

R.A. Salvatore has written many fantasy books about a dark elf, The Dark Elf Trilogy is the beginning, very easy to read but still enjoyable.


Kenny Simi Ann wrote: "I know that nothing can be the same as LOTR - and I'm not looking for anything to take its place. However, if anyone has any suggestions to help steer me towards other books with a similar flavor ..."

I like "The Riddle Master of Hed" Trilogy, "Dragonriders of Pern" also good. By the way Dennis Mckiernans books' are directly taken from Tolkien, right or wrong ?


Irene I have loved reading these comments as I now have so many new Authors to try. Thank you so much. I would recommend Stephen Donaldsons Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. Nothing is like Lord of the Rings, that was just amazing.


message 36: by Mary (new) - rated it 5 stars

Mary I second George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire seris and Frank Herbert's Dune books. Also - Stephen King's Dark Tower series is wonderful. The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley are also good.


Kenny Simi Irene wrote: "I have loved reading these comments as I now have so many new Authors to try. Thank you so much. I would recommend Stephen Donaldsons Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. Nothing is like Lord of the Ring..."

I liked both Covenant series as well.


message 38: by Navkendar (new) - added it

Navkendar My choice of books in this genre (recommended in the same order) :

1) Robert Jordan - Wheel of Time
2) George R R Martin -Song of Ice and Fire series
3) Malazan Series
4) LOTR


Irene Kenny wrote: "Irene wrote: "I have loved reading these comments as I now have so many new Authors to try. Thank you so much. I would recommend Stephen Donaldsons Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. Nothing is like Lo..."

I am currently reading George RR Martin's Song of Fire and Ice series and am totally addicted.


Gerald Black Any of the Mithgar novels by Dennis McKiernan are very Tolkein influenced, but really good.


message 41: by Josh (new) - rated it 5 stars

Josh Mcdonald I'm currently reading Clash of Kings, the second book of George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series. I'd certainly add my voice to the recommendations it's getting. So far it feels more like a "post-Tolkein" work. If you imagine Middle-Earth several generations after the end of LotR ... elves and Istari have departed to the western lands, magic and supernatural things have receded into legend and tall-tale, but they still exist somewhere waiting for a chance to assert themselves once more.


Pratiti Try anything else by Tolkien, also The Dark is Rising sequence by Susan Cooper and The Chronicales of Narnia by C.S. Lewis (but no one can really live up to Tolkien).


Elizabeth Robin Hobb's Farseer Trilogy, Live ship trilogy and The Tawny Man Trilogy are all very good, all the books tie together to make up a very good well written story.

another series that i found to be similar to LOTR was written by Alison Corggon. the naming, the riddle, the crow and the singing. this is a more young adults series but it is well written and follows a good story


Kenny Simi Josh wrote: "I'm currently reading Clash of Kings, the second book of George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series. I'd certainly add my voice to the recommendations it's getting. So far it feels more like ..."

i hadn't looked at it that way. nice comparison.don't know if i'll read the latest if it's ever realeased been a ong time since i read the last book.


Melinda Gebhart I would definately recommend Thomas Covenant, you will fall in love with the world Donaldson creates. I also agree with the suggestion of the Pern novels and you might want to try the Earthsea books. This is a little off the beaten track since it is more Sci-Fi than fantasy but you might enjoy The Saga of Seven Suns by Kevin J. Anderson. It has the large sweep of LOTR.


Holly By David Eddings - The Belgariad (5 books, main character: Garion), The Mallorean (3 books, mc: Garion), The Elenium (3 books, main character: Sparhawk)and The Tamuli (3 books, mc: Sparhawk)

By Patrick Rothfuss - The two books published so far in the Kingkiller Chronicles.

By Anne McCaffery - The Dragonriders of Pern series, and The Harper Hall Trilogy.


Kenny Simi Holly wrote: "By David Eddings - The Belgariad (5 books, main character: Garion), The Mallorean (3 books, mc: Garion), The Elenium (3 books, main character: Sparhawk)and The Tamuli (3 books, mc: Sparhawk)

By ..."


The Mallorean is 5 books also, loved The Belgariad and The Elenium.Dragonriders also great. Try Patricia Mckillips Riddlemaster Trilogy, one of my all time favorites


Sabine Reed Hi. Kenny suggested David Eddings books...try the Belgariad. That's the best series.


message 49: by Anne (new) - rated it 5 stars

Anne L. Try Gail Z. Martin's Chronicles of the Necromancer. My husband is reading and enjoying the first book of George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series. Personally, I adored the original Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever by Stephen R. Donaldson, though I haven’t yet read the second and last chronicles.


message 50: by Wastrel (new) - added it

Wastrel There is nothing like Tolkien. Many, many writers have taken plot elements and world-building from Tolkien, but they are all a lot more... mundane. Less fantastical. Most mainstream fantasy since Tolkien has been sort of 'the real world but it looks like Tolkien' sort of thing - 'the same plots as usual but with wizards and elves' sort of thing.

That's fine if that's what you liked about Tolkien, but to me it's more capturing the shape of Tolkien than the flavour of Tolkien. If I wanted the 'flavour' of Tolkien, I'd go with the earlier 'classic' fantasies, before it became commercially succesful. These often retain the same sort of dreamy-mythic-archaic side of Tolkien, not to mention the elaborate and unusual prose style.

So, maybe investigate writers like Eddison (The Lord of the Rings was originally compared to Eddison's 'The Worm Ouroborous'), Mirrlees, Vance, Anderson, Peake, etc?

Donaldson's "Thomas Covenant" series sort of tries to match Tolkien in both style and content (the second series, in particular, has the prose style most similar to the classic fantasy writers of any modern writer I can think of), though I think it falls short in both dimensions.


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