On the Southern Literary Trail discussion

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On Southern Class and Culture > Southern Discomfort: Tumultuous Literature set in the American South

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message 1: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Angle (angleonwriting) | 9 comments Southern Discomfort: Tumultuous Literature set in the American South http://www.abebooks.com/books/america...


message 2: by Jessie J (new)

Jessie J (subseti) | 296 comments I like this list because it includes some genre fiction and other non-academic books that I think I'd enjoy reading.

And why do Southern authors dwell on the dark side? It's damned uncomfortable living here.


message 4: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 127 comments This is a great list. I remember reading Black Like Me repeatedly in junior high. I need to give that another look. As I recall, it was a really stunning portrait in being black in America (at that time).


message 5: by Zorro (new)

Zorro (zorrom) | 177 comments Jessie wrote: "And why do Southern authors dwell on the dark side? It's damned uncomfortable living here ..."

It's just so hot and humid!


message 6: by Jessie J (new)

Jessie J (subseti) | 296 comments Everitt wrote: "Speak for yourself, I find the South (Texas/Louisiana) very comfortable. It's the best place in the US to live. Hot and humid is great weather. No sarcasm intended. (Okay maybe it gets a little old..."

Everitt, do you remember living here before central heat/air was ubiquitous? ;^) Alabama was bad enough--I can't imagine Louisiana without air conditioning...

We don't get the 20 below (I think 8 below may be the lowest I remember?), but we get the wind and fog and sleet in the winter, too (usually, except for last winter). Winter is just so dadgum unpredictable.


message 7: by Zorro (new)

Zorro (zorrom) | 177 comments 110 was just a little too hot for me this summer!


message 8: by Jessie J (new)

Jessie J (subseti) | 296 comments Everitt wrote: "Oh yes, I remember the window unit A/C quite well, and I'd still prefer the South."

I was thinking more of a high-tech window fan. Ah, the relief!


message 9: by Zorro (new)

Zorro (zorrom) | 177 comments In southwest Texas we had 'evaporative coolers' in the 1950's when it didn't rain for 7 years. Then when it started to rain again, the humidity was so high in the house that everything in Mother's closet had mold and mildew growing on it.


message 10: by Zorro (new)

Zorro (zorrom) | 177 comments This is my 70th year in Texas, and I wouldn't want to move anywhere else (now that we have central air conditioning)!


message 11: by Larry (new)

Larry Bassett | 0 comments Zorro wrote: "This is my 70th year in Texas, and I wouldn't want to move anywhere else (now that we have central air conditioning)!"

When I visited Houston some years ago, I was told that there are underground passages built between the tall buildings so that you didn't have to go out in the weather.

I guess I could just ask Google, but do you know if this is true?


message 12: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 3972 comments Mod
I know this sounds wierd, but when I'm reading a southern novel set before A/C was a common thing in the south, I like to read outside on my porch. It gives me more of a sense of really being inside the book.


message 13: by Zorro (new)

Zorro (zorrom) | 177 comments Everitt wrote: "Zorro,

Texas is wonderful when you are young. But i couldnt imagime retiring here, even if it is super cheap. Recentpy there has been some talk of retirees choosing the hill country to more expens..."


Actually for me the worst part is drought. We don't mind paying to be cool, but when there is no rain, and we are not allowed to water and have to watch our beautiful trees die, it is really hard.

Where are you, Everitt? I am in Fair Oaks Ranch, near Boerne and San Antonio.


message 14: by Jessie J (new)

Jessie J (subseti) | 296 comments So far we don't have water restrictions (plenty of that), but we do have burn restrictions in dry weather.


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