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message 1: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 70 comments Mod
What's on your mind?


message 2: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 70 comments Mod
Some of the members who have already joined are not writers.

We'll wait and see, but was thinking that readers could find a one-stop shop for new writers and books. Maybe do a find or peruse for new material.


message 3: by Kieron (new)

Kieron (kierondowling) | 4 comments Hi, everyone: Just wanted to introduce myself. I am Kieron Dowling, the author of Deadly Game. Thank you for allowing me to join the group to promote my book. I look forward to everyone's posts.


message 4: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Bunn | 11 comments Thanks, John, for running this group. I guess I'll introduce myself too. I'm Christopher Bunn. California farm boy, still living and working on the family farm. Writer, refugee from TV/entertainment biz (many years in kids entertainment and UK television), repressed songwriter, and pie-baking addict. I hope you're all well and blessed on what looks like to be a very sunny, beautiful day (er...at least right here in California).


message 5: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 70 comments Mod
Thanks Christopher. Interesting background you have there.

Pies. Maybe you can offer insights into how one goes about baking black birds into pies? And why do they do so in the UK?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sing_a_S...

Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye.
Four and twenty blackbirds,
Baked in a pie.

When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing;
Wasn't that a dainty dish,
To set before the king?

The king was in his counting house,
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour,
Eating bread and honey.

The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes;
When down came a blackbird
And pecked off her nose.[1]

The final line of the fourth verse is sometimes slightly varied, with nose pecked or nipped off. One of the following additional verses is often added to moderate the ending:

They sent for the king's doctor,
who sewed it on again;
He sewed it on so neatly,
the seam was never seen.[1]

or:

There was such a commotion,
that little Jenny wren;
Flew down into the garden,
and put it back again.[1]


message 6: by Richard (new)

Richard Sutton (richardsutton) | 25 comments Let's see... can I assume that the rye in question is contained in a glass flask? If so, then enough rye in pocket might make the eating of grackles en crout, not so bad at all... On second thought, you could do much better with the sixpence.


message 7: by Richard (new)

Richard Sutton (richardsutton) | 25 comments Of course, aren't we all taught that in grammar school? Simply jibing with you!


message 8: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 70 comments Mod
So what's the political message behind it? I know USA politics to some degree, but UK is a whole 'nother thing.


message 9: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Bunn | 11 comments I'm afraid if I started baking blackbirds in pies out here in California, I would get hauled into court by the blackbirds rights activists. Strawberries and rhubarb are much safer.


message 10: by Richard (new)

Richard Sutton (richardsutton) | 25 comments not to mention carrying concealed grain in public!


message 11: by Richard (new)

Richard Sutton (richardsutton) | 25 comments ...pecked off a lot more than her nose!


message 12: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Bunn | 11 comments Wow. Didn't have the faintest idea about that song. That's pretty fascinating.


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