The Gothic Novel Book Club <Hiatus> discussion

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E-reading versus Books.

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Stephen Hegedus | 205 comments Mod
We're all familiar with the new way to read - many book stores (including the one I work for) are selling e-readers now. What are your feelings on them? Do you like them? Why or why not?


message 2: by Denise (new)

Denise (dulcinea3) | 154 comments I haven't gotten an e-reader yet. I have tons of books, many of which I haven't even read yet! I don't think I'd really prefer an e-reader to an actual book, although I can see that it would be great on vacation and that sort of thing.


message 3: by Louise (last edited Sep 16, 2012 03:37AM) (new)

Louise Don't have an e-reader and until I go backpacking around the world and can only fit so many books in my bag I don't really want one. I enjoy paper books too much.


message 4: by Kim (new)

Kim I thought I would hate ereaders for all the reasons everyone states. I received one for christmas several years ago and was slow to get on board even then. Now however, I am in love with mine and thinking of getting a competitor's model as well. The sunlight is not an issue and to be honest I love having a bit of hands free reading. Now I struggle to hold onto any library book and wish I could prop paperbacks as easily as an ereader - I also find myself wishing I could change the font size or background page color of library books to be easier on my eyes LOL! Being able to switch which book I am reading with a couple of touches of a finger to suit my mood is valuable as well. To each their own... I'm just surprised at how I have had to eat my words regarding ereaders!


message 5: by Paulina (new)

Paulina (paulinabibliophile) | 192 comments Rida wrote: "I really, really, really don't like e-readers. I don't know what people see in them, to be honest. You can't FEEL the book in your hands, you can't turn the pages, there's no book smell, and person..."

Yes!! I agree with you 100%. I need to feel the book. I need to turn pages. I'm glad I'm not the only one who doesn't mind their books getting a little banged up here and there. It shows they're loved, albeit and abusive sort of love, but loved nonetheless.


message 6: by Paulina (new)

Paulina (paulinabibliophile) | 192 comments Whenever I have a day off I peruse my city for those lovely old used book shops. I love looking for old forgotten books. You can find some real gems. I once found a Dickens that was over a hundred years old!
I actually heard that some 7 million books get thrown out every year. When I heard that I was stunned! Throwing...book...in trash?? WHAT? The idea did not make sense. Why throw them out?! Whenever I want to lighten my load I hand books down to my younger family members. Then I can turn my cousins into little book worms...


message 7: by Lindsay (last edited Sep 27, 2012 06:45AM) (new)

Lindsay (linkeepsitreal) Rida wrote: "I really, really, really don't like e-readers. I don't know what people see in them, to be honest. You can't FEEL the book in your hands, you can't turn the pages, there's no book smell, and person..."

While I agree that books are a unique experience, I am very troubled by the attitude that people who read e-readers are somehow getting less out of their reading experience, as though their reading is not as 'legitimate', as though their reading practices are deficient in some way, as though reading books is the only way to really, truly enjoy a story. I mean, it's not like books aren't the evolution of other storytelling methods--to me, it's the same as saying that reading a book isn't the same experience as experiencing the story orally, or something like that. It might be different, yes, but it depends on how you like to read. I believe that reading itself is the experience; if you like the culture that surrounds physical books, that's wonderful, I do too! Respectfully, I am very uncomfortable with the assertion that people who prefer e-readers are seen as Second Citizens of Reading, as though wonderful books and stories are cheapened simply by being transferred from one format to another, as though all people should enjoy reading in the same way. To me, imagination is the thing; I don't care how people read as long as they read.

I use both. I have far more physical books, but the e-reader is great for storing tons of books without taking up space or killing too many trees. I buy my favourites in hard copy, and for books I'm just meh or curious about, I read them on my e-reader. I don't find that my experience reading on e-readers is cheapened.

(Also, just since this seems to be a general misconception: e-readers don't have backlights. They use a technology, or at least mine does, that makes the screen look like a book page in tone and texture. Pretty tough to tell the difference.)


message 8: by Kim (new)

Kim One other point I like to make about ebooks is that the technology really opens up opportunities for authors to self publish and for us readers to have more wonderful stories to peruse. There is the opportunity for immediate feedback and many times publishers follow up on word of mouth from people and what they want to read. I've read some great stuff that - for now - is only available in eformat.


message 9: by Denise (new)

Denise (dulcinea3) | 154 comments Paulina wrote: "I actually heard that some 7 million books get thrown out every year. When I heard that I was stunned! Throwing...book...in trash?? WHAT? The idea did not make sense. Why throw them out?! Whenever I want to lighten my load I hand books down to my younger family members. Then I can turn my cousins into little book worms..."

I have thrown some books away. In some cases, because they were literally falling apart, either because I had read them so many times, or they were old and not good quality (those paperbacks that we used to order at school). Also, once my elderly sick cat accidentally peed on the lowest shelf of a bookcase, and I definitely threw those out!

I wanted to say that I definitely do not look down on people who use e-readers, even though I do not use one myself! Any method of reading is wonderful!


message 10: by Alyne (new)

Alyne Winter | 30 comments Denise wrote: "Paulina wrote: "I actually heard that some 7 million books get thrown out every year. When I heard that I was stunned! Throwing...book...in trash?? WHAT? The idea did not make sense. Why throw them..."

This blows me away! Here in Seattle they have these little libraries set up like little shrines on the block where people can take a book, trade a book or just borrow it. Its all very free in the best sense. There are always places to give books away.
Perhaps the folks who work in landfills can catch a little reading on the job. :)


message 11: by Alyne (last edited Sep 29, 2012 06:36PM) (new)

Alyne Winter | 30 comments Paulina wrote: "Whenever I have a day off I peruse my city for those lovely old used book shops. I love looking for old forgotten books. You can find some real gems. I once found a Dickens that was over a hundred ..."

I sell mine to the second hand stores. Let someone make a living and others get inexpensive books. Of course nothing gets to the writer at that stage. Except maybe a fan.


message 12: by Alyne (new)

Alyne Winter | 30 comments Rida wrote: "I really, really, really don't like e-readers. I don't know what people see in them, to be honest. You can't FEEL the book in your hands, you can't turn the pages, there's no book smell, and person..."

Books were literally considered magical objects in the olden days. They still are. Writing fiction is certainly a magical practice. The wood of the tree that makes the paper is part of the magic, the ink, the leather or cloth cover - are all ingredients in the spell of a book.

I have the first Kindle reader. It's good for book I want to read quickly and may not keep. But I feel like I might drop it, or break it or something. I should get a cover then that might be allayed, but I miss flipping back and forth and smelling the smell of a book.


message 13: by Denise (new)

Denise (dulcinea3) | 154 comments Alyne wrote: "Denise wrote: "Paulina wrote: "I actually heard that some 7 million books get thrown out every year. When I heard that I was stunned! Throwing...book...in trash?? WHAT? The idea did not make sense...."

Really? You would want a book that a cat peed on? I don't like throwing away books, but I really did think that was a good reason!


message 14: by Louise (last edited Sep 30, 2012 03:03PM) (new)

Louise Well I wouldn't! But then I have picked up a dog poo from one of my sisters books she keeps lying around on the floor, wiped the book down, and given it back to her. (In my defence I did tell her what had happened and it being a ridiculously expensive accademic book she wasn't gunna throw it out or buy a new one!).

Only book I think I've actually thrown away was a library book (shock!) after it got so damaged in a flood that it practically disintegrated and the library refused to take it back.


message 15: by Paulina (new)

Paulina (paulinabibliophile) | 192 comments Denise wrote: "Alyne wrote: "Denise wrote: "Paulina wrote: "I actually heard that some 7 million books get thrown out every year. When I heard that I was stunned! Throwing...book...in trash?? WHAT? The idea did n..."

Haha! I'm sorry, I can't believe I forgot the "my cat decided my bookshelf was a litterbox" stipulation! In that case, yea, throw the book out. My point was that with actual books there is a sense of community. You pass on the books you loved and someone else gets to love them all the same. *sniff*


message 16: by Alyne (new)

Alyne Winter | 30 comments That cat wanted that book BAaaaaaD!


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