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The L&G Kitchen Party > The Movie Room

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message 1: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
True, I know squat about movies and watch one about once every two years, but if it's a book-movie connection we're talking, it's worth talking!

Just read that the Toronto Film Festival screened the new production of Cloud Atlas. I loved the book, but wondered how all of those stories would jibe. Seems they didn't. Or so the viewers thought.

In the Boston. com review, the writer said that, among a packed audience of 600, a grand total of three (3) applauded as the credits rolled. Uh, meet Oh!


message 2: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
I liked the movie version of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel much better than the book....unusual for me....I usually find movies fall short of the books they are based on.


message 3: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) Films today don't move me. My idea of a good movie is "Salt Of The Earth."


message 4: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Joanne wrote: "Films today don't move me...""

Movies today don't film me. There is really no accounting... :)
(Truth be told, I won't spend money on streaming new releases, and the archives of Netflix have about sixty-five gazillion old ones, so I'm naturally predisposed to embrace your view of the matter.)


message 5: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
Gabi wrote: "We don't have Netflix. Is it like Cable?"

No. It's a rental service. You can get DVDs in the mail or with the right device you can stream them through your computer direct to your TV screen. We do both.


message 6: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments We do streaming ,at least my daughter does. I don't watch TV much. I am still waiting for the second season of Downton Abbey on netflix.


message 7: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Ruth wrote: "Gabi wrote: "We don't have Netflix. Is it like Cable?"

No. It's a rental service. You can get DVDs in the mail or with the right device you can stream them through your computer direct to your TV ..."


I actually stream them directly to my phone, and watch them in bed. I also have a DVD player that connects to the Wi-Fi router and has netflix software installed, so I can stream to the TV, but it's easier for me to watch the handheld screen, I've found, since I can lie on my side.


message 8: by Blood Bone and Muscle (last edited Sep 10, 2012 11:09PM) (new)

Blood Bone and Muscle | 83 comments If anyone wants a well thought, movie leveled, hip and new version of Sherlock Holmes, BBC Sherlock is a masterpiece for getting you to think and sit at the edge of your seat. It has witty dialogue and proves to be a new spin on an age old tale.

Of course different opinions and different taste buds change the view for each. In the context of the usual television nowdays, it's a wee bit refreshing (still silly, of course).

Caution: This show includes a very slappable Sherlock, an even more injurable Moriarty and a constantly struggling to survive explaining his place in this, Watson.

Here's a scene which I think is fortunate enough to win a place in this groups heart: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8gqhT...

Here is Sherlock, correcting a man's grammar.


message 9: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments Blood Bone and Muscle wrote: ". . . BBC Sherlock is a masterpiece ..."
This has taken the UK by storm. Unfortunately, we are having to wait for new episodes to be written. Set in the 21st century, it is full of allusions to the original stories. For example, when Holmes meets Watson, the latter is a former army doctor arriving home (as in the original) from the war in Afghanistan. It also, as in the clip, captures the exasperating nature of Holmes. Brilliant stuff. (I see, however, that, for the sake of a joke, the writer has re-introduced hanging.)


message 10: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
I love the new Sherlock too....can't wait for the next series.


message 11: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Consider his age...


message 12: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
We watched a few episodes of the new Sherlock and decided we hated it. Too much physical action, too little witty dialogue.


message 13: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
We don't stream all our movies because not everything is available to stream. Also, we only stream foreign films. With our older Roku device we have no way of getting subtitles on an English language film. Since we're both a little hard of hearing, and since enunciation lessons seem to have been be left out of the younger actors study plans, we like subtitles on all films.


message 14: by Susan (new)

Susan I have enjoyed the newer BBC Sherlock. The USA series set to debut soon is another matter. They have recently begun airing the ads and trailers ... not holding my breath ....


message 15: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Ruth wrote: "We don't stream all our movies because not everything is available to stream. Also, we only stream foreign films. With our older Roku device we have no way of getting subtitles on an English langua..."

Feel exactly the same way. Must have subtitles, or everything merges, in the words of Poe, "into a dreamy, indeterminate hum." That's another reason I'd rather watch Netflix on my phone than engage the DVD Netflix streaming software on my DVD, which for some reason doesn't render subtitles. Somebody really ought to make subtitles a higher priority in all forms of streaming software.


message 16: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
Our universal remote turned up its toes last night, prompting a long overdue visit to Best Buy. We came home with a new remote, a new HDMI cable to fix a long-standing work-around, and the new, improved Roku, which will allow us to get the English language subtitles.

Geek Squad will be front and center tomorrow to install and program all this stuff. We are too old to be crawling around on the floor with cables and such nowadays.


message 17: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Geek Squad (Best -- Ha! -- Buy) is not long for this world...


message 18: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Newengland wrote: "Geek Squad (Best -- Ha! -- Buy) is not long for this world..."

Don't know why. I always thought "best" meant "highest price it is possible to find in the known universe for this item."


message 19: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
One of the things you can pay for is convenience. As I've gotten older, it's become more and more attractive.


message 20: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
That's what the nearby Whole Foods store counts on!


message 21: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Ruth wrote: "One of the things you can pay for is convenience. As I've gotten older, it's become more and more attractive."

I agree. I was actually referring just to product prices, which (in conjunction with the misleading name) have always annoyed me. I have no problem with the "geek squad."


message 22: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
I'll never forget the time I accompanied a friend who was just "looking at computers" in a Best Buy store. They were all over her like used car salesmen. Almost creepily-so. Must've been a commission thing, I figured.


message 23: by Susan (new)

Susan Newengland wrote: "That's what the nearby Whole Foods store counts on!"

Don't forget Trader Joe's and Earth Fare .... I'd starve without them.


message 24: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Trader Joe's is MUCH more reasonably priced than Whole Paycheck. Much.


Blood Bone and Muscle | 83 comments A Smiley featurette of the anti-Bond. : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8x7qu...


message 26: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Beware the jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious cumberbatch.


message 27: by Blood Bone and Muscle (last edited Mar 02, 2013 10:54AM) (new)

Blood Bone and Muscle | 83 comments Gabi wrote: "All fine actors - I like Gary Oldman, plays the evil whatever consummately!

That cumberbatch bloke is seriously ugly!"


Ah, but Cumberbatch makes a very convincing Sherlock. However I agree, his natural blond hair is not fitting in the slightest.


message 28: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments This has been stuck in my head all day.

http://m.youtube.com/index?&deskt...


message 29: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Carol wrote: "This has been stuck in my head all day.

http://m.youtube.com/index?&deskt..."


You poor thing! Do you think a solvent might help? Or maybe a nap?


message 30: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments I thought this was the music thread. Haha!


message 31: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Second time watching "The Life of Pi" , we enjoyed it so much.


message 32: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments This weekend we watched "Lincoln" and " Les Miserables". Too much singing in the later and too slow moving, in the first one.


message 33: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 1259 comments Went to see Oblivion and loved it. Local reviews were mixed so wasn't expecting much but loved it! If you hate sci-fi don't go, if you hate Tom Cruise don't go, if you don't want to concentrate to work out who are the good guys and who are the bad guys, don't go.....for movie buffs there are lots of references to other movies...especially Star Wars .....but there are also Top Gun and Titanic and other movies hinted at...if you can handle something that makes you think a little bit and don't mind dystopian future scenarios then this one is worth a try. Visually spectacular, with a little adventure and romance thrown in.....but who can you trust???


message 34: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharonstar) | 3345 comments I saw Mud a few days ago and can highly recommend it.


message 35: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments I saw mud a few days ago and stepped in it. I can not highly recommend the strategy, as it seems to result in wet socks.


message 36: by Sonali (new)

Sonali V | 182 comments Saw the latest The Great Gatsby. Liked it. The romance has become the focus of the movie. I read the novel sometime ago and so I don't remember very clearly but wasn't the romance very subtly presented there? The Robert Redford starter was closer to the novel in spirit, perhaps.


message 37: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments I have no desire to see the movie, I didn't like the book. In fact. Fitzgerald is not someone I would read. His ramblings don't appeal to me.


message 38: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Carol wrote: "I have no desire to see the movie, I didn't like the book. In fact. Fitzgerald is not someone I would read. His ramblings don't appeal to me."

I've read The Great Gatsby. It defies my comprehension that Fitzgerald is celebrated for his linguistic versatility (let alone his narrative propensities). Ok. Compared to Hemingway (granted), he is nearly a competent writer. (But then, so is a gibbon.) Compared to James Joyce or T.S. Eliot, he is flagrantly mentally deficient.

The movie, for all of that, may have been good, so I'm making no pronouncements with respect to the cinematic realization. Could well be a silk purse.


message 39: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Sonali wrote: "Saw the latest The Great Gatsby. Liked it. The romance has become the focus of the movie. I read the novel sometime ago and so I don't remember very clearly but wasn't the romance very subtly pre..."

Sonali - I'm sorry... missed your comment, initially. If you enjoyed the movie, I'm sure it has merit. As I mentioned to Carol, I'm just not an admirer of Fitzgerald's craft. But good movies from indifferent books often proceed (and conversely)... and de gustibus non disputandum, of course, in any case.


message 40: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Mark wrote: "Carol wrote: "I have no desire to see the movie, I didn't like the book. In fact. Fitzgerald is not someone I would read. His ramblings don't appeal to me."

I've read The Great Gatsby. It defies..."


In a sows ear. I agree about Fitzgerald, I can't cotton to him, to hard to unravel.


message 41: by Mark (last edited May 24, 2013 07:51PM) (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Carol wrote: "Mark wrote: "Carol wrote: "I have no desire to see the movie, I didn't like the book. In fact. Fitzgerald is not someone I would read. His ramblings don't appeal to me."

I've read The Great Gatsb..."


Yes, Fitzgerald's a complete enigma to me. You can make a good movie out of anything (except perhaps a speech by John Boehner), and Sonali enjoyed it, so undoubtedly, the director did a really good job. But the source material is Fitzgerald! Have you ever been able to figure out what the literary establishment saw in Fitzgerald as so unaccountably appealing? That he was an American who could write (mostly) grammatical sentences? There have been one or two others. :) Even Stephen King does that pretty well, and *his* books are actually entertaining. :)


message 42: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments I always felt as if I was in a drunken stupor with Fitzgerald. He bored me. I know it is a matter of taste. Me I like Faulkner, and many don't , so there you go.


message 43: by Mark (last edited May 24, 2013 09:25PM) (new)

Mark | 1471 comments I liked The Sound and the Fury. Faulkner isn't a favorite of mine, but I can comprehend in principle why he's admired as a writer. Fitzgerald's only besetting sin isn't that he's boring, but I think his literary deification presaged the current practice of handing out Pulitzers to what seem, almost uniformly, to be works of pretentious, vapid, gimmicky cr*p, intended to mesmerize the New York Literary establishment. (Really, it's all been quite unnecessary; a swinging pocket watch would have been sufficient.)


message 44: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Hahahahaha...... like that Mark. Swinging pocketwatch...you are getting sleepy....


message 45: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Carol wrote: "Hahahahaha...... like that Mark. Swinging pocketwatch...you are getting sleepy...."

Heh. I wish I were. I always stay up all night: some sort of lycanthropic genetic anomaly. What's astonishing is that the roster of reading of the Pulitzer Committee does not keep them in a state of perpetual narcosis. :) :)


message 46: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Other award groups I don't understand is the Nobel Prize selections and the Mann Booker. Maybe it is all politics.


message 47: by Mark (last edited May 24, 2013 11:52PM) (new)

Mark | 1471 comments No question of it. St. John Perse beat out James Joyce for the Nobel, and that inimitable, world-famous literary force of nature, Halldór Laxness (!), won the Nobel in '55. And as for the "triple crown" (Pulitzer, Mann Booker, and MacArthur Genius (!) Award), have you read The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao?! (Don't even bother to try unless you're fluent in Spanish and have an illimitable tolerance for misogynistic epithets. I'm fluent in Spanish, but couldn't get past the second prerequisite.)

In case you're curious:

http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 48: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Didn't even bother with it Mark. I liked your review.


message 49: by Mark (new)

Mark | 1471 comments Carol wrote: "Didn't even bother with it Mark. I liked your review."

Thanks! You're well advised not to bother. I wasn't exaggerating about the unremitting misogynistic epithets, in English AND Spanish. There's a much more entertaining review than mine (if you're bored) with 82 mostly-entertaining comments, here:

http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

But it does go to show about the "criteria" (!) now employed by those awards committees.


message 50: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
I find I generally enjoy the Mann Booker short list.


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