Barnes & Noble Nook discussion

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Illegal???

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Crystal | decorating.reader (decoratingreader) Ok I know a bunch of us trade digital copies on here of books but I've been seeing them actually sold on eBay??? Isn't that illegal??


message 2: by willaful, dedicated nookworm (new)

willaful | 414 comments Mod
Technically trading is illegal too, unless it's done through the sellers. Selling on ebay certainly is slimy, though. You should be able to report the sellers.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

The only people who should profit from sell of books are the author and publishers...so wrong!! Report the ebay seller immediately.


message 4: by Robyn (new)

Robyn Marsh (darby52) | 4 comments If you are sharing books over SS for one time reads i think that is fine, it is when you are going to reread the books you should really buy them. But right now with the ebook market so expensive it a catch 22.


message 5: by Harper (new)

Harper O'Connor (ravencomeslaughing) | 20 comments I agree that the ebay person probably doesn't have the appropriate distribution license for ebooks and that should be looked into.

But just as a point of discussion (not a troll-starter), how is it any different than, say, if your family member or friend or co-worker gives you a used book? Or like the last several places I've worked, they have a shelf in the break room for "trades"? If you like it and decide to keep it, might that not be an incentive to then go buy things by the same author?

Just a thought.


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

Giving and selling are legally different activities. For example, I can give you my kidney, but I can't sell it to you.


message 7: by Tai (last edited Sep 28, 2012 09:52AM) (new)

Tai (msglam) Meghan wrote: "I agree that the ebay person probably doesn't have the appropriate distribution license for ebooks and that should be looked into.

But just as a point of discussion (not a troll-starter), how is i..."


I believe (and someone correct me if I am wrong) the difference with eBooks is you are typically not giving up your copy to someone else. You are giving them essentially an unpaid for copy of the book since you both can read it simultaneously.

However I have seen this argue both ways with equal amounts of passion.
A few of those arguments were that a lended eBook could transfer into many future sells for the author that they may not have gotten because a person that wasn’t intrigued enough (whether because it’s an author they haven’t read before or they weren’t sold because of reviews, etc) to purchase their own copy but having read it now loves the author and purchases everything the author writes.
I have also seen the argument that people should not have to repurchase books in eBook format that they have in a printed version. Many people still like to have an actually library collection with beautiful covers but like the ease of access multiple books via a lightweight device.
But on the authors side they are not being paid for a copy/version of their book they worked hard to write. Also the author’s rights to their work are being violated.

There are many more arguments to the governing of eBooks and eventually as with everything else a way to manage everyone’s interest will be figured out.


message 8: by willaful, dedicated nookworm (new)

willaful | 414 comments Mod
The biggest difference is that you can only resell or give away your used book once. You can do it with an ebook any number of times, and you don't have to have bought the book in the first place. Analogies between physical books and ebooks tend to fall down, they're just too dissimilar.

I do sympathize with someone who bought an ebook and didn't want to keep it and then feels disgruntled because there's nothing else you can legally do with it -- I've felt the same way. And I suppose it's possible that the ebay seller is in that position and will be deleting their legally purchased copy once it's sold. Possibly.


message 9: by Jean (new)

Jean French (jfrench55) | 82 comments I think a good compromise would be to allow all books, not just a select few to be lent more than once. Then it would be like a hard copy of the book. You couldn't read it or lend it while someone else has it.


message 10: by willaful, dedicated nookworm (last edited Sep 30, 2012 10:13AM) (new)

willaful | 414 comments Mod
Jean wrote: "I think a good compromise would be to allow all books, not just a select few to be lent more than once. Then it would be like a hard copy of the book. You couldn't read it or lend it while someon..."

Yeah, the more publishers try to control how people use their ebooks, the more they piss people off and encourage them to go around the rules. Smart authors and publishers don't use DRM.


message 11: by David (new)

David Spiller | 1 comments Many books are free domain; either the book never had a copy right or the copy right has expired. For example all of Jules Verne's books are Free Domain, no copy right.

However, the programing for the table of contents, page set up, picture editting so it looks good on a nook, and the ablity to link book marks to other reading devices --- are copy right protected.

If you want free domain books without the nice stuff, try these web sites. You will need to back load these onto your devise.

http://www.gutenberg.org
The largest site but sometimes hard to just look, you need to know what you want. Has several formates of books including language and versions.


http://manybooks.net/
My favorite site; books are sometimes cleaned up and table of contents added. Very easy to just look till you find something you want to read.

http://www.onlinefreeebooks.net
tech books including cars.

http://www.feedbooks.com/
both copy writen (for a fee) and free domain books.


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