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2012 Group Reads - Archives > Nominations For November 2012

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message 1: by Silver (new)

Silver In order to stay ahead of the game, it is time to think about what we want to read following Faust, starting in November.

Because that is gearing up to the Holiday season in which many of you will probably be busy, this time I want to focus on a nouvelle or shorter works of fiction.

You may nominate anything which fits within the groups time period, but try and keep your nominates to no more than 200 pages long.


message 2: by Jenn (last edited Sep 06, 2012 04:02PM) (new)

Jenn | 20 comments I'll nominate The Turn of the Screw.


message 3: by Frances, Moderator (new)

Frances (FrancesAB) | 1169 comments Mod
I'd like another shot at Zuleika Dobson which came in second last read. Or An Ideal Husband


message 4: by Silver (new)

Silver I am going to go with Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë


message 5: by Kim (new)

Kim (KimMR) | 317 comments I'll nominate My Lady's Money by Wilkie Collins.


message 6: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments A funny novel would be a nice change but I can't think of any at the mo.


message 7: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments MadgeUK wrote: "A funny novel would be a nice change but I can't think of any at the mo."

I agree, but I can't think of any either.

Does that mean that the Victorians and 19th century Americans didn't have much of a sense of humor since that genre is sadly lacking? ;)


message 8: by Silver (new)

Silver Lynnm wrote: "MadgeUK wrote: "A funny novel would be a nice change but I can't think of any at the mo."

I agree, but I can't think of any either.

Does that mean that the Victorians and 19th century Americans d..."


They could be very satirical in their writings, so I would not say they lacked a sense of humor, but perhaps had a more dry/sardonic humor, in part perhaps because they were so critical and cynical of the society in which they lived in and much of the writing of this time is a commentary upon their society.

Perhaps a lot of the writing of this time is not outright funny, but a great deal of it has strongly humorous aspects.


message 9: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 07, 2012 12:27PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Dickens of course used a lot of humour but the Group is already 'doing' Dickens.


message 10: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Yes, Dickens is humorous. And Oscar Wilde.

And it is a drier sense of humor - I found Sherlock to be funny too, but it wasn't laugh out loud funny.


message 11: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments What about the Edwardian, G K Chesterton's Father Brown Mysteries? It would be a counterbalance to Sherlock Holmes, as he is a completely different character and very funny. Say one or more of the short stories from The Scandal of Father Brown:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Scandal-Of-...


message 12: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments MadgeUK wrote: "What about the Edwardian, G K Chesterton's Father Brown Mysteries? It would be a counterbalance to Sherlock Holmes, as he is a completely different character and very funny. Say one or more of th..."

Love it! Great find, Madge. I'd definitely vote for it.


message 13: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 07, 2012 01:00PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Good. It could be a contrast and compare with SH exercise too.


message 14: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments MadgeUK wrote: "It could be a contrast and compare with SH exercise too, Lynn."

True! Although people might be a bit sick of Sherlock at this point. :-)

I don't know what is wrong with me, but lately I'm more interested in reading "different" than the more "serious" 19th century literature.

This fits the bill.


message 15: by Lynnm (last edited Sep 07, 2012 01:12PM) (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments BTW Madge - I still would love to do A.S. Byatt's The Children's Book at some point.

If we can't do it as a main read, maybe after the new year, we could do a buddy read if others were interested.


message 16: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 07, 2012 01:34PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Yes, it would be a good choice as it is encompasses the Edwardian era even if it was not written then. Which reminds me that her Angels and Insects is two short novellas about the Victorian era, which are very amusing and are a pastiche of Victorian life and manners, with lots of literary allusions, as with The Children's Book.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29...

Perhaps worth doing as a 'shortie' sometime.


message 17: by Kim (new)

Kim (KimMR) | 317 comments My Lady's Money is supposedly quite light-hearted, but I'm not sure if that means funny. GK Chesterton would be good too - I've been wanting to read some Father Brown stories.

Lynn, I'm up for a buddy read of The Children's Book if it isn't selected. I've been meaning to read it for years.


message 18: by Silver (new)

Silver I was considering doing a short story for December instead of having a book. We could do a side by side, have members nominate a Victorian or Edwardian short story, and do something with Byatt


message 19: by Denise (new)

Denise (drbetteridge) | 33 comments Lynnm wrote: "BTW Madge - I still would love to do A.S. Byatt's The Children's Book at some point.

If we can't do it as a main read, maybe after the new year, we could do a buddy read if others were interested."


I just bought The Children's Book and would love to read it, too. I bought it for my mom last Christmas, and she really enjoyed it.


message 20: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 08, 2012 02:13AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments It also has the advantage of having a really pretty cover:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The...


With deckle edges in the American edition:-

http://www.amazon.com/The-Childrens-B...

I love the imitation gold tooling, reminiscent of the books of my childhood. I have a friend who has a collection of Victorian gold tooled books in his dining room upon which, at night, he shines discreet lights which catch the glimmer of the gold, like these-

http://www.violetbooks.com/gallery/fl...

http://www.violetbooks.com/gallery/la...


message 21: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Kim wrote: "My Lady's Money is supposedly quite light-hearted, but I'm not sure if that means funny. GK Chesterton would be good too - I've been wanting to read some Father Brown stories.

Lynn, I'm up for a ..."


Kim - I looked it up - sounds good as well! Depending on what people vote for, maybe we could do both Father Brown and My Lady's Money.


message 22: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments MadgeUK wrote: "It also has the advantage of having a really pretty cover:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The...


With deckle edges in the American edition:-

http://www.amazon.com/The-Children..."


It does have a great cover.

It is very long though so I like your suggestion about Angels and Insects (one of Byatt's that I haven't read yet).


message 23: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Yes it is a long read - it would need the full month.


message 24: by Celtic (new)

Celtic (Celtic_) If you're looking for 'funny' then I really enjoyed Twain's 'Innocents Abroad' - more in the nature of wry observation than comic, but very entertaining - it tells the story of his European cruise, mostly round the Mediterranean, ending up in the Holy Land.


message 25: by msleighm (new)

msleighm You want short and funny, there's always Saki...


message 26: by Frances, Moderator (new)

Frances (FrancesAB) | 1169 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "It also has the advantage of having a really pretty cover:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The...


With deckle edges in the American edition:-

http://www.amazon.com/The-Children..."


I'm so glad to hear someone commenting on the aesthetics of the books themselves-I do love a beautifully made book.


message 27: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments FYI - the poll is up for voting.


message 28: by Linda (new)

Linda (Linda2) | 3479 comments MadgeUK wrote: "Yes, it would be a good choice as it is encompasses the Edwardian era even if it was not written then. Which reminds me that her Angels and Insects is two short novellas about the Victorian era, w..."

Didn't find Angels and Insects amusing at all, but I'm game to re-read.


message 29: by Linda (new)

Linda (Linda2) | 3479 comments Oops, voting just ended.


message 30: by Silver (new)

Silver Becasue Agnes Grey and The Turn of the Screw were so neck and neck a run off poll haas been posted.


message 31: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Agnes Grey won - why a run off? Even if it is only one vote, it is still the winner.


message 32: by Silver (new)

Silver Lynnm wrote: "Agnes Grey won - why a run off? Even if it is only one vote, it is still the winner."

Becasue they were so close, and they were in a tie for a very long time, I just thought I would do a run off.


message 33: by Frances, Moderator (new)

Frances (FrancesAB) | 1169 comments Mod
I support a run off with close calls-I think you will get more readers if they actually voted for the book in question.


message 34: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Silver wrote: "Lynnm wrote: "Agnes Grey won - why a run off? Even if it is only one vote, it is still the winner."

Becasue they were so close, and they were in a tie for a very long time, I just thought I would..."


Sorry, Silver, didn't mean to question your decision. I was just surprised. Definitely not a problem, and as Frances said, it might get more readers.


message 35: by Lily (last edited Sep 27, 2012 06:04PM) (new)

Lily (Joy1) | 2612 comments The Turn of the Screw and The Aspern Papers by Henry James are the scheduled reads in the Victorian Group for October.


message 36: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (DeborahKliegl) | 3764 comments Mod
Lynnm wrote: "BTW Madge - I still would love to do A.S. Byatt's The Children's Book at some point.

If we can't do it as a main read, maybe after the new year, we could do a buddy read if others were interested."


I would buddy read on this one too.


message 37: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya (ztrotter) | 1596 comments MadgeUK wrote: "Yes, it would be a good choice as it is encompasses the Edwardian era even if it was not written then. Which reminds me that her Angels and Insects is two short novellas about the Victorian era, w..."

MadgeUK, Lynnm, I need your help with The Children's Book. I started reading it before my trip to Russia, and when I came back, everything was out of sync, or to be more precise, the time was out of joint;-) so, it is still there, next to my bed stand, collecting dust. How about the buddy read?


message 38: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya (ztrotter) | 1596 comments Deborah wrote: "Lynnm wrote: "BTW Madge - I still would love to do A.S. Byatt's The Children's Book at some point.

If we can't do it as a main read, maybe after the new year, we could do a buddy read if others we..."


Deborah, sorry, I overlooked your post. Let's push for the buddy read together:-)


message 39: by Lynnm (last edited Sep 29, 2012 01:57PM) (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments I'm up for a buddy read on The Children's Book!

When does everyone want to do it? I can start at any time.

So far it looks like the people interested are: me, Zulfiya, Madge, Kim, Denise, and maybe Rochelle (she posted about Angels & Insects so not sure if she would be interested in The Children's Book).

We can post to see if anyone else is interested as well.


message 40: by Silver (new)

Silver I cannot give a commitment or any guarantees but I might be interested if I can fit it in with whatever else I have going on.


message 41: by Linda (new)

Linda (Linda2) | 3479 comments Lynnm wrote: "I'm up for a buddy read on The Children's Book!

When does everyone want to do it? I can start at any time.

So far it looks like the people interested are: me, Zulfiya, Madge, Kim, Denise, and ma..."


If I can find it in our library system. I've also read Possession.


message 42: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya (ztrotter) | 1596 comments I need two weeks to untangle the reading haywire of four concurrent reads and minimize it to three, and then I will be fully charged to start a new adventure:-) Besides, we might need a schedule and the participants will need some time to find the copies.


message 43: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya (ztrotter) | 1596 comments Oops, sorry for a typo. I wanted to say 'the reading quagmire':-)


message 44: by Lily (new)

Lily (Joy1) | 2612 comments I may lurk, since my copy sits out on my coffee table (not stuck on a shelf or buried in a stack, even after all these months), saying clearly, "you bought me. but I look too lengthy to be read. and you weren't all that fond of Possession either, even though you recognize it was a finely written work. i'm Byatt all over again, sitting here waiting for you to tackle me."


message 45: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya (ztrotter) | 1596 comments It is always easier to tackle a big read in a company and when it is divided into sections. I feel more obligated to read when I have peers:-) Just a communal sense of duty, and what a pleasant duty it is:-0


message 46: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments It is very long, but I thought it was definitely worth it. And it is easier if you have a group of people who are reading it with you.


message 47: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments FYI - I opened a thread in Buddy Reads so that we can discuss reading proposals.


message 48: by Lily (last edited Sep 30, 2012 05:03PM) (new)

Lily (Joy1) | 2612 comments Zulfiya wrote: "...I feel more obligated to read when I have peers:-) Just a communal sense of duty, and what a pleasant duty it is:-0 ..."

No commitment or communal sense of duty here on this one! Sorry! But did decide to comment that the discussion will be of interest beyond those of you who are committed. (view spoiler)


message 49: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya (ztrotter) | 1596 comments Lynnm wrote: "FYI - I opened a thread in Buddy Reads so that we can discuss reading proposals."

Thank you, Lynnm.


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