The Newbery Award and Honor Book Club discussion

552 views
Welcome! > Introductions

Comments Showing 1-50 of 117 (117 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3

message 1: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Welcome to our fabulawesom group! Tell us about yourself, your favorite books, interesting interests, unique unique-ities, and the like!

As for me, I love almost anything that even resembles a book, although I don't read very much contemporary fiction. I'm a college student (sort of), and hoping to someday join the real world as a high school English teacher. I love drawing, hiking, clothes, food, and hanging out with my family (whether that means hours of card games or watching episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation).

My list of favorite books is much too long to list, but here are a few highlights:
Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury
The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit Or There and Back Again by J.R.R. Tolkien
Enchantress from the Stars by Sylvia Engdahl
Hard Times by Charles Dickens
Crime and Punishment by Feodor Dostoyevsky
Foundation by Isaac Asimov
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
and then all the staple children's series like the Little House books, The Chronicles of Narnia and The Prydain Chronicles.


message 2: by Amanda (new)

Amanda (amandahandiamhen) | 4 comments Hallo and well met! I am the notorious Amanda Greene. My interests include medieval history, swords and it's kin, writing, outdoorness, and meditation. I love to read books, mostly (though not limited to) fantasy. I am currently in the middle of the Fellowship of the Ring and am loving every minute of it. Here followeth a summarized version of my list of favorite books.



The Hobbit Or There and Back Again by J.R.R. Tolkien
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Wringer by Jerry Spinelli
Leven Thumps and the Gateway to Foo by Obert Skye and all the other in the series.
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli


message 3: by Bennett (new)

Bennett | 8 comments What a pleasure to be numbered among this austere and eclectic group. By way of introduction I am known as Dad by a few, Sweetie by one and I can only begin to guess what else by others. I contracted book fever as a skinny teenager when I found a collection of Isaace Asimov short stories in the bookmobile that rolled through my little home town in the summer of 69. (Oh, those were the days!) My reading interests since have shifted, changed, been stuck in a rut, changed again and more than a few times come back again full circle. I am somewhat broad in my interests, but never stray very far from children's lit. 23 years as an elementary school teacher has helped fuel that interest and has provided great opportunities for sharing. Every now and then I find a gem that is absolutely "list worthy", but here are just a couple of my tried and trues that will forever be on the shelf of "must reads"

The Chronicles of Prydain and anything else by Lloyd Alexander
Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury
The Giver by Lois Lowry
The Foundation Series by Isaac Asimov
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Walden by Henry David Thoreau

A small beginning to a lengthy list. I am looking forward to this opportunity to share some really "Good Reads!"


message 4: by Adelina (last edited Feb 07, 2009 09:55AM) (new)

Adelina | 37 comments Thank you Dad, for pointing out my folly in not introducing myself properly here. I am a mom to two, wife to one, and friend to many. Thanks to wonderful parents who instilled in me the love to read, I have almost always had a book nearby to be read. I have fond memories of litening to Dad read us the Prydain series and Through the Looking Glass, and Mom reading us Little House on the Prairie. Although my love of books varies across may genres, I am currently very much enjoying history, fiction and non. I shall indulge and give you a list of books I feel everyone must read at some point in their life

The Giver by Lois Lowry
Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Chronicles of Prydain Boxed Set by Lloyd Alexander
Redwall by Brian Jacques


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi, somehow I missed this thread before. My introduction feels rather inauspicious compared to a few of yours. I've always loved childrens' lit and currently do volunteer work (data entry) for a school library that is trying to switch to computer records from a card and pocket system.

Newbery Award Winners and their honor counterparts are part of the 5th and 6th grade book report assignments, so the more I know the more I can help students who come in looking for materials.

Here are some of my favorite books:
Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell
Yertle the Turtle by Dr. Seuss
Dr. Seuss's Sleep Book by Dr. Seuss
Holes by Louis Sachar
Till We Have Faces A Myth Retold by C.S. Lewis
The King Must Die A Novel by Mary Renault
The Menace From Earth by Robert A. Heinlein


message 6: by Ranae (new)

Ranae | 9 comments It was pointed out that joining and participating in this discussion group would be a much better use of my time than playing Luxor, and I had no argument, so after much prodding from my loved ones I will use my brain instead of letting it go to mush. I do LOVE to read, I just don't get too involved in online discussion groups. Some of my favorites BOOKS are:
The Yearling (thanks Mrs. Joyce, 4th grade)
Where the Red Fern Grows (thanks Mrs. Coleman, 5th grade)
The Seer and the Stone (thanks to the library for putting it on the wrong shelf)
Goose Girl (thanks to everyone who had checked out Princess Academy and this one was the only one left by the same author) I like this one best so far of her books
Walking Across Egypt (are you getting tired of the thanks line?)
The #1 Ladies Detective Agency series (I've read them all)
Burning Up
Anna Karenina
Tony Hillerman detective series,
okay, this is getting too long so I'll leave it at that.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Amanda wrote: "Hallo and well met! I am the notorious Amanda Greene. My interests include medieval history, swords and it's kin, writing, outdoorness, and meditation. I love to read books, mostly (though not l..."

I wonder, why are you notorious? very curious,
Alice




message 8: by Amanda (last edited Feb 28, 2009 03:22PM) (new)

Amanda (amandahandiamhen) | 4 comments Alice wrote: "Amanda wrote: "Hallo and well met! I am the notorious Amanda Greene. My interests include medieval history, swords and it's kin, writing, outdoorness, and meditation. I love to read books, mostl..."

I'm really not that notorious I like to give myself random titles here and there. In fact I'm probably less than notorious.


message 9: by Rory M. (new)

Rory M. My name is Rory & I am a middle grades teacher of language arts in Florida. I'm currently teaching 8th grade but I've taught 6th and 7th grades as well as math. I love that this group exists because I'm always trying to get the right book in the hand of the right student at the right time (which I can't do unless I read them too!).

My favorite book of all time is The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. The first book I ever read on my own was Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl in 5th grade.

I not only love to read but I love movies! When I was a kid visiting my dad in Frenchtown, NJ my favorite thing ever was to spend Friday night at the Barn Theater. Sitting in those big red leather seats, I fell in love with Conan, Black Beauty, Bastian/Atreyu and stories...



message 10: by Bennett (new)

Bennett | 8 comments Rory wrote: "My name is Rory & I am a middle grades teacher of language arts in Florida. I'm currently teaching 8th grade but I've taught 6th and 7th grades as well as math. I love that this group exists beca..."

Rory, welcome to the group. As you can see we have set a pattern for reading two common books a month and sharing thoughts, insights and feelings about them. We certainly welcome thoughts about other than the two books highlighted each month. So far the books that we have chosen have been honor books. Any suggestions for upcoming reads are always welcome. Megan is our group leader. I taught 4th through 6th grades for 23 years. 8th grade! You are a champion!


message 11: by Rory M. (new)

Rory M. Bennett wrote: "Rory wrote: "My name is Rory & I am a middle grades teacher of language arts in Florida. I'm currently teaching 8th grade but I've taught 6th and 7th grades as well as math. I love that this grou..."


Bennett: Thank you for the gracious welcome! Yes, 8th grade has it challenges...my left eye stopped twitching right after Christmas but we are in the post-FCAT, pre-Spring Break period that makes us all go crazy. Love my students though! In fact, that's why I'm on this board - gotta read the books to get the kids to read the books, right? Happy readin!



message 12: by Catherine (new)

Catherine | 3 comments Hi everybody! This looks like a lovely group.

I just finished The Graveyard Book and thought it would be fun to read all the Newbery Award winners. After finding a complete winner and honoree list I realized that GoodReads must have some little niche group to help me with this endeavor. And here you are!

Anyway, I’m a bilingual elementary ed. student…so a new and idealistic teacher. I’ve always loved children's lit, but see it now as my duty to be more informed of what all the crazy kids are reading these days, and what they should be reading. While in school I work at Starbucks, and the caffeine keeps me reading through the wee hours of the night. I’m also a big fan of travel, the outdoors, taking baths, waking up early (although I’m not always so good about following through on this one), cooking and eating what I cook, or eating anything that anyone else cooks. I’m sure there are lots more things to say, but most importantly, I love to read, and only wish I had more time to do so. Don’t we all?

Some favorite books when I was a child:

The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton
Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll
From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Aesop’s Fables
The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams
The Complete Tales of Whinnie The Pooh by A.A. Milne
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
The Giver by Lois Lowry…oh how the list can go on…



message 13: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Catherine wrote: "Hi everybody! This looks like a lovely group.

I just finished The Graveyard Book and thought it would be fun to read all the Newbery Award winners. After finding a complete winner and honoree li..."


Welcome Catherine! What grade(s) are you planning on teaching when you make it out of college? It was a hard decision for me when I first thought about teaching, but I just didn't think I had the patience for the elementary grades.

Welcome again!


message 14: by Adelina (new)

Adelina | 37 comments Catherine wrote: "Hi everybody! This looks like a lovely group.

I just finished The Graveyard Book and thought it would be fun to read all the Newbery Award winners. After finding a complete winner and honoree li..."


Welcome welcome! The Giver is my absolute favorite! I just recently read Alice's Adentures and through the looking glass, and really enjoyed both. HOpe to see you around!


message 15: by Catherine (new)

Catherine | 3 comments Megan wrote: "Catherine wrote: "Hi everybody! This looks like a lovely group.

I just finished The Graveyard Book and thought it would be fun to read all the Newbery Award winners. After finding a complete w..."


I used to think I was better suited to be a secondary ed. teacher. I love lit, in depth study and discussions. Then I spent some time teaching at both the high school and at a first and second grade level and I fell in love with the little ones. I felt so in touch with the kid's enthusiasm and passion to learn.


message 16: by Catherine (new)

Catherine | 3 comments Adelina wrote: "Catherine wrote: "Hi everybody! This looks like a lovely group.

I just finished The Graveyard Book and thought it would be fun to read all the Newbery Award winners. After finding a complete w..."


Yes! After reading The Giver I felt excited and surprised by the new level of lit that I never knew existed. I finished it and could not believe there were books like this. :) Uncle Tom's Cabin has been on my list a long time...thinking now is a good time to read it.


message 17: by Ashley (new)

Ashley (affie) | 36 comments Hello everyone. I just finished one of the books on the honor list (The Family Under the Bridge; simple, but sweet story) and I noticed this group. I have had a set goal to read every book on the Newberry Award Winner and Honor list for a little over a year now, and thought I should join this group.

About me... I am currenlty attending a University. I am studying Psychology with a minor study in Political Science. I graduate this December (YAY!!) and after a short break I plan on attending Law School. (Although graduate studies in social psychology would be absolutely fascinating). I am very interested in a lot of different things. I absolutely LOVE to read, and I read a wide variety of novels.

A few of my many favorites are:
Where the Red Fern Grows- Wilson Rawls. My teacher read this book to us in 4th grade, and I had to leave for a few minutes, because my 'allergies' were acting up. If I had to pick one, I would say this is my favorite book of all time. I have read it probably over 5o times, and I bawl every time. If you haven't read it, you need to. Even if you don't like animals. (I don't...) This is one of the few books that gives me vivid mental pictures. Most books I just read, and experience. This book I read and experience, and see, and live it and on and on and on. Sorry- I could go on about this wonderful book forever, but I will stop...
I also love My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult
The House of the Scorpion- Nancy Farmer (NBH)
Speak and Twisted- Laurie Halse Anderson
Bud, Not Buddy- Christopher Paul Curtis
The Witch of Blackbird Pond- Elizabeth George Speare
The Bronze Bow- Elizabeth George Speare(This book was a little iffy through most of it, but has a fabulous ending. The ending to this book demonstrates some of the most phenomenal character growth I have ever come across. Wonderful...!)
I also love Cynthia Voigt (both the Tillerman Cycle with 7 books, and the 4 books under the Novels of a Kingdom 'series'.
Sharon Creech is another favorite author. LOVE her.

Sorry about the long post. I tend to get a little carried away when I talk about books. ~Small sheepish grin~

Thanks for a great group idea!


message 18: by Kristen (last edited Jun 05, 2009 10:13AM) (new)

Kristen Jorgensen (sunnie) I guess I never introduced myself. Funny because I've been around for awhile. There are a couple of Newbery groups on Goodreads. I have read almost all the medals (10 left) but wanted to work on the honor books, so I joined this group. Happy to find a place that is reading both.
My biggest problem is remembering about the books I read so long ago, so if I don't always comment it's because I only remember the basic storyline and not specifics. I enjoy everyone’s insights though.

My newest passion for the last few years has been following Mock Newbery's online. It's pretty fun. But when I went to find a Mock Newbery group on goodreads there wasn't one so I started one awhile ago.

http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/1...

Follow along if you are interested.

My favorite Newberys that I have read are:

A Year Down Yonder
A Single Shard
Holes
Hitty Her First Hundred Years
Number the Stars
Joyful Noise Poems for Two Voices

I always think it's fascinating to look at the Newbery medal vs. the honors.

I love your polls and how you choose the books. Seriously. So if it's ok I'm going to copy you on the Mock Newbery group.




message 19: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Ashley wrote: "Hello everyone. I just finished one of the books on the honor list (The Family Under the Bridge; simple, but sweet story) and I noticed this group. I have had a set goal to read every book on the N..."

My mom read Where the Red Fern Grows to my younger siblings when I was a senior in high school. I used to sit outside her bedroom door and listen, until I was found out and then I figured I might as well stop pretending to be grown up and joined them all on the bed for storytime. It's such a good book!


message 20: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Kristen wrote: "I guess I never introduced myself. Funny because I've been around for awhile. There are a couple of Newbery groups on Goodreads. I have read almost all the medals (10 left) but wanted to work on..."

What is a 'mock newbery'? I'll have to check this out.
I know what you mean on the forgetting details of stories. When I was younger I used to laugh at my older sister when she would say she had forgotten things about books. I thought I would always remember every story perfectly. Oh, how young and foolish I was...

No problem on the polls, glad you like the system. It took me a while to find a good method, but I really like how this has worked. If you're interested in the specifics, I use a random number generator and tell it to give me ten years between 1922 and 2009, the first five I take the winner from that year and I randomly select the honor books from the second five years.

Going to check out this Mock Newbery thing now...


message 21: by Kristen (last edited Jun 05, 2009 06:35PM) (new)

Kristen Jorgensen (sunnie) Megan wrote: "Kristen wrote: "I guess I never introduced myself. Funny because I've been around for awhile. There are a couple of Newbery groups on Goodreads. I have read almost all the medals (10 left) but w..."

A Mock Newbery is basically like holding your own Newbery vote on the current books and deciding which one you think should win or take the honors. It's pretty fun. Glad you are interested.
My hope is that we will read the ones that win before they win.
:)



message 22: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments I'm excited about it, looks great. Whenever I read all the honor and award books for a past year, I like to see how they match up, whether the award winner is the one I would have picked. (But I read them so randomly that there are very few past years that I've read all the books- honor and award winner- for.)


message 23: by Adelina (new)

Adelina | 37 comments Megan wrote: "Kristen wrote: "I guess I never introduced myself. Funny because I've been around for awhile. There are a couple of Newbery groups on Goodreads. I have read almost all the medals (10 left) but w..."

You laughed at me?!!!! I can't believe it! Well at least you have admitted your foolishness~


message 24: by Sherry (new)

Sherry Crockett | 1 comments My name is Sherry. I'm new to goodreads and am just learning my way around. This is the first group I've joined and look forward to reading what others have to say about the Newbery winners and honor books. I've been a school librarian (both elementary and middle schools) for 30+ years so have read a "few" Newbery books during that time....LOL.


message 25: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Welcome, welcome!


message 26: by Mandy (new)

Mandy | 8 comments Hello! I am the director of a preschool/kindergarten in the state of Washington. I've been looking for a group to read and discuss literature with and nothing fits me more than these well written children's books. I'm a bit picky about what I read but I've never been dissappointed with a Newbery Winner :o)


message 27: by Mandy (new)

Mandy | 8 comments Oops! My all time favorite (and first ever read) Newbery is "The Giver". Hands down. Runner up would be "The Tale of Despereaux".


message 28: by Adelina (new)

Adelina | 37 comments Mandy wrote: "Oops! My all time favorite (and first ever read) Newbery is "The Giver". Hands down. Runner up would be "The Tale of Despereaux"."

I couldn't agree more with you Mandy! Although I stil haven't read The Tale of Despereaux.


message 29: by Mandy (new)

Mandy | 8 comments Adelina wrote: "Mandy wrote: "Oops! My all time favorite (and first ever read) Newbery is "The Giver". Hands down. Runner up would be "The Tale of Despereaux"."

I couldn't agree more with you Mandy! Although I..."


Despereaux is a wonderful book! Author Kate DiCamillo pulls you in and makes the reader a part of her stories. Definitely an author you'd want to become more familiar with :o)Lowry really opened up the Science Fiction genre for me - without The Giver I would have never picked up a Harry Potter book!!



message 30: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Reading the Giver back in middle school is probably one of my life-changing moments.

I recently read The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, and I think I liked it better than Despereaux.


message 31: by Adelina (new)

Adelina | 37 comments Megan wrote: "Reading the Giver back in middle school is probably one of my life-changing moments.

I recently read The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, and I think I liked it better than Despereaux."


You really read it in middle school? I thought it took a lot longer to get you to read The Giver!



message 32: by Mandy (new)

Mandy | 8 comments Megan wrote: "Reading the Giver back in middle school is probably one of my life-changing moments.

I recently read The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, and I think I liked it better than Despereaux."


I personally would have a hard time choosing which DiCamillo book was the *best* but I would lean toward Because of Winn Dixie. And (dare I say it) the movie matched the book wonderfully, in my opinion. I remeber reading that Kate spent a lot of time on the set to make sure the book shined through the production. I love her writing! Megan, have you read any of the Mercy Watson series?


message 33: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments You know, I always forget about Winn Dixie. I liked it, but it's probably my least favorite of the three. The movie was good too, I like it when the author keeps a close watch over the adaptation.
As for the Mercy Watson books, I haven't, would you recommend them?


message 34: by Mandy (new)

Mandy | 8 comments Megan wrote: "You know, I always forget about Winn Dixie. I liked it, but it's probably my least favorite of the three. The movie was good too, I like it when the author keeps a close watch over the adaptation..."

Mercy Watson is a cute little pig that gets into mischief but manages to save the day in the end. The two elderly neighbors always see that it's indeed Mercy that starts the problem and are annoyed that she also end up being the heroine. At the end of each book they come to like Mercy a little more. I haven't been able to really fall in love with Mercy, though I like the expandable idea :o) (I've also some to realize that I generally don't like series) One year I read the books to my 3-4-5 year olds towards the end of the school year and THEY really enjoyed Mercy. We would read a chapter or two each day. The children would have to recall what we read the day before and where we stopped in the book. That particular group of kids liked the suspence and the twist that always made her the heroine. I would recommend that children's lit readers give it a chance :o)


message 35: by Ranae (last edited Aug 28, 2009 07:47PM) (new)

Ranae | 9 comments I'm excited to see what comments you have to make and WELCOME to the group!! (Reply to Sherry's post of about 7 days ago)


message 36: by Shaundell (new)

Shaundell | 2 comments Hello group! I have been reading your posts and am excited to join this group! My name is Shaundell and I currently teach junior high school English and business. One of my goals has always been to read the Newbery books and this can help me on my quest! Young adult literature is by far my favorite! Here are some books and authors that I have really enjoyed -

Little House on the Prairie Series
Bud, Not Buddy and The Watsons Go to Birhimgham by Christopher Paul Curtis
most anything by Sharon Creech
The Book Theif by Marcus Zusak
Because of Winn-Dixie
The Secret Life of Bees
Jane Austen

I look forward to reading new books, reading posts, and having a great discussion! :)


message 37: by Tristan Naraine (new)

Tristan Naraine (TristanNaraine) I have just recently seen your message Shaundell from 10/25 at 1:33 PM and I am glad to say that I am reading Pride and Prejudce by Jane Austen and will be glad to update you on my progress of this classic novel in American Literature.

I am a fan of Young Adult Literature too :D


message 38: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Shaundell wrote: "Hello group! I have been reading your posts and am excited to join this group! My name is Shaundell and I currently teach junior high school English and business. One of my goals has always been t..."

Welcome, Shaundell! Sharon Creech has been a favorite of mine since I first read Walk Two Moons in third grade.


message 39: by Ashley (last edited Oct 30, 2009 10:33AM) (new)

Ashley (affie) | 36 comments Megan wrote: Sharon Creech has been a favorite of mine since I first read Walk Two Moons!

Same here! One of my all time favorite books, and I love just about everything I have read by her since then!


message 40: by Tristan Naraine (new)

Tristan Naraine (TristanNaraine) great to meet you guys (shaundell & Megan)


message 41: by Caren (new)

Caren (carenb) | 13 comments I have read all of the Newbery Winners, and there are some really bad choices out there. Two of the worst, in my opinion, are: "M.C. Higgins The Great", and "Smokey the Cowhorse". No kid will check either of these out, and if they have they bring them back.
There are some good ones that have been chosen..."TheTale of Desperaux", "Number the Stars", just to name a couple.
Recently, I feel they have tried to be PC, and they have chosen some awful books..."Good Masters! etc", is a terrible read for a child. Not one child wants to read it..."The HIgher Power of Lucky" (really?!!!). again no child likes this in my library..."The Underneath", (?!!). How the Newbery committee didn't chose "Chains", or "The Miraculous Journey Of Edward Tulane", or "Ida B" is just unbelievable to me.
They forget to think about what kids would read, a book that is presented to kids, not a book that has to have a serious message every time. I am not a fan of the Newbery books anymore. They have just gone off the deep end. I read every single winner both medal and honor, and sometimes I just can't recommend the books to the kids, neither do I even purchase them.
They have missed so many good books.
This year, I am only highlighting the books that might being considered for the Caldecott and I am totally skipping any books being considered for the Newbery. I have read many of them and will read them all after, but it is just not worth it anymore.
I am a librarian at an elementary school, and I see what kids are reading. I am very knowledgeable on children's literature and try to lead them to many different genres from any year, but kids just aren't reading the recent winners.
That is my humble opinion!
They should chose librarians like myself, who are in touch with kids on a daily basis, not these literature professors, they just aren't in touch with kids, no matter what they think!


message 42: by Megan (last edited Nov 28, 2009 12:41PM) (new)

Megan | 86 comments Caren wrote: "I have read all of the Newbery Winners, and there are some really bad choices out there. Two of the worst, in my opinion, are: "M.C. Higgins The Great", and "Smokey the Cowhorse". No kid will ch..."

I am really impressed that you have read all the Newbery's!
I agree with a lot of what you said about the recent choices (though I haven't read anywhere close to all of them). I have been pretty let down by a couple that I have read recently, including Penny from Heaven. It just wasn't a fun read. And isn't that what kids are looking for in a book, fun? Hopefully the committee can break from its current perceived pattern and choose books that kids actually enjoy.


message 43: by Nikki (new)

Nikki (nikkiivie) Caren wrote: "I have read all of the Newbery Winners, and there are some really bad choices out there. Two of the worst, in my opinion, are: "M.C. Higgins The Great", and "Smokey the Cowhorse". No kid will ch..."

Welcome Caren, and let me just say, "AMEN!"

I've read perhaps 40% of the Newberys...many of them with my children and I've had the same impression as you. It seems like the committee (more so in recent years) feels they must choose books with some underlying social/emotional significance, and it's just down-right annoying. "Lucky"...no kid is interested in reading about alcoholism...or divorce...or death. Yes, these are the realities for some children, but children want to read for PLEASURE! If those topics can be addressed within the context of a fantastic story line--great! But it feels like the social message takes precedence over the story and, in my opinion, that shouldn't be the case. Let's stick with stories that help our children develop a love of reading!

Maybe sometime you could share with us your "top 20 list of great books the Newbery committe passed up".


message 44: by Caren (new)

Caren (carenb) | 13 comments I will work on that! Coming soon. Of course, it is just my opinion, but I have deeply "annoyed" as well.


message 45: by Inoli (new)

Inoli | 1 comments I'd like to see your top 20 list too. I've only recently started reading Newberry winners and the few I've picked so far have been older.


message 46: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments I've put up a new discussion in the extra-curricular folder where I hope you'll all give us a list of some of your favorites.


message 47: by Kristen (last edited Nov 28, 2009 12:04PM) (new)

Kristen Jorgensen (sunnie) Caren wrote: "I have read all of the Newbery Winners, and there are some really bad choices out there. Two of the worst, in my opinion, are: "M.C. Higgins The Great", and "Smokey the Cowhorse". No kid will ch..."


The Newbery committee is a diverse group. If you go to the ALA website you can look up the names of the men and women on the committee. One is a children’s lit. librarian in Austin, for example. Many librarians, including elementary librarians, can have their voice heard.

The Newbery award is given to the most “distinguished contribution to American Literature for children” for the year. M.C. Higgins was published in the early 70's and Smokey was published in 1926. In my opinion this is simply proof of the advancements in Children’s literature. The current Newberys are more widely read and enjoyed by children then the older ones. Present Good Masters, Sweet Ladies and The Story of Mankind to a child and observe which they choose.

Critics last year debated about the value of the Newbery medal. They claimed that because children were pushed into reading Newberys their reading enjoyment plummeted and that we are raising a generation of non readers because of it. The belief here that parents, teachers and librarians only push Newberys (a lot of hogwash in itself).

However now critics are claiming that the committee has bowed to public popularity because they chose The Graveyard book. A book children do find appealing.

In the end it's all as you point out, a matter of opinion. While you thought The Underneath not enjoyable for kids, I saw four 3rd grade elementary classes clamoring to meet the author and tell her how much they loved her book. My daughter loved it and has read it three times now. In fact it was my pick to win the Newbery last year not The Graveyard book.

I have been watching both, the Newbery and the caldecotts and have found some wonderful contenders for both awards. For me the Newbery this year has been far more interesting.

Some of my picks for the Newbery 2010 awards are:
Where the Mountain Meets the Moon
All the Broken Pieces
and, The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate

All three have a good strong family.
There are many interesting stories out there and true not all of them make the Newbery cut, but the last few years are not as worthless as some make them seem.



message 48: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Kristen wrote: "Caren wrote: "I have read all of the Newbery Winners, and there are some really bad choices out there. Two of the worst, in my opinion, are: "M.C. Higgins The Great", and "Smokey the Cowhorse". ..."

I've heard really good things about The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate and am hoping I can find it at my library next week. Also, I've been thinking that even though I haven't enjoyed every Newbery I've read, I have found the majority well worth my time. So in part it's a matter of taste, and out of hundreds of books chosen over the years no one could be expected to like them all.
I sort of rely on the Newbery committee for my children's lit reading list. Mostly because I don't have enough time to search out and create my own. Overall, this has worked pretty well for me and I'm always open to suggestions of non-newberys. Despite recent disapointments, I think I will continue with optimism in my quest to read all the past Newbery books, and look forward with interest to see what is chosen in the future.


message 49: by Jim (new)

Jim | 16 comments i'm in my forties (barely), studing to be a librarian. been a bookseller in some fashion since i was 15. got back into ya/kidlit after retaking a college kidlit course a couple years ago. and took the newbery class the american library asscociation offers last year. trying to read all the newbery/caldecott award books. favourites; Mad. L'Engle, My Side of the Mountain and Sharon Creech's works. the three most pointless winners were what janie saw, westing game and (sorry) the giver.


message 50: by Megan (new)

Megan | 86 comments Jim wrote: "i'm in my forties (barely), studing to be a librarian. been a bookseller in some fashion since i was 15. got back into ya/kidlit after retaking a college kidlit course a couple years ago. and too..."

Welcome to the group!
I also love Sharon Creech and Madeleine L'Engle's books, but then I loved both The Westing Game and The Giver. I don't think I've ever met anyone who didn't like The Giver, so this is kind of exciting.
Welcome again to our group.


« previous 1 3
back to top