Popular History Of Psychology Books

(showing 1-50 of 62)
The Story of Psychology The Story of Psychology (Paperback)
by (shelved 3 times as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.98 — 1,434 ratings — published 1993
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Memories, Dreams, Reflections Memories, Dreams, Reflections (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 4.18 — 53,313 ratings — published 1961
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The Passions of the Mind The Passions of the Mind (paper)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.98 — 2,173 ratings — published 1971
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Acts of Meaning Acts of Meaning (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.99 — 521 ratings — published 1990
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A History of Science in Society: From Philosophy to Utility A History of Science in Society: From Philosophy to Utility (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.67 — 53 ratings — published 2004
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An Argument for Mind An Argument for Mind (Hardcover)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 4.07 — 67 ratings — published 2006
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Siddhartha Siddhartha (Mass Market Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.99 — 578,319 ratings — published 1922
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Candide Candide (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.75 — 247,050 ratings — published 1759
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Galatea 2.2 Galatea 2.2 (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.74 — 3,623 ratings — published 1995
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The Way We Are The Way We Are (Hardcover)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.79 — 75 ratings — published 2006
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The Denial of Death The Denial of Death (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 4.19 — 21,928 ratings — published 1973
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Freud: A Life for Our Time Freud: A Life for Our Time (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 4.13 — 2,563 ratings — published 1987
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Proust Was a Neuroscientist Proust Was a Neuroscientist (Hardcover)
by (shelved 1 time as history-of-psychology)
avg rating 3.83 — 15,267 ratings — published 2007
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“The philosopher and historian George Santayana once remarked that those who do not know their history are doomed to repeat its mistakes. A perusal of some of the essays will reveal that this is not always true. In some cases psychologists have known about mistakes of the past and sought to repeat them. But the recurrence can sometimes be fruitful: going round in circles can be a good thing, provided the circle is large that when one returns to the task one sees it in a new light and the error brings new insights.”
Noel Sheehy, Fifty Key Thinkers in Psychology

Judith Lewis Herman
“It was Freud's ambition to discover the cause of hysteria, the archetypal female neurosis of his time. In his early investigations, he gained the trust and confidence of many women, who revealed their troubles to him.Time after time, Freud's patients, women from prosperous, conventional families, unburdened painful memories of childhood sexual encounters with men they had trusted: family friends, relatives, and fathers. Freud initially believed his patients and recognized the significance of their confessions. In 1896, with the publication of two works, The Aetiology of Hysteria and Studies on Hysteria, he announced that he had solved the mystery of the female neurosis. At the origin of every case of hysteria, Freud asserted, was a childhood sexual trauma.
But Freud was never comfortable with this discovery, because of what it implied about the behavior of respectable family men. If his patients' reports were true, incest was not a rare abuse, confined to the poor and the mentally defective, but was endemic to the patriarchal family. Recognizing the implicit challenge to patriarchal values, Freud refused to identify fathers publicly as sexual aggressors. Though in his private correspondence he cited "seduction by the father" as the "essential point" in hysteria, he was never able to bring himself to make this statement in public. Scrupulously honest and courageous in other respects, Freud falsified his incest cases. In The Aetiology of Hysteria, Freud implausibly identified governessss, nurses, maids, and children of both sexes as the offenders. In Studies in Hysteria, he managed to name an uncle as the seducer in two cases. Many years later, Freud acknowledged that the "uncles" who had molested Rosaslia and Katharina were in fact their fathers. Though he had shown little reluctance to shock prudish sensibilities in other matters, Freud claimed that "discretion" had led him to suppress this essential information.
Even though Freud had gone to such lengths to avoid publicly inculpating fathers, he remained so distressed by his seduction theory that within a year he repudiated it entirely. He concluded that his patients' numerous reports of sexual abuse were untrue. This conclusion was based not on any new evidence from patients, but rather on Freud's own growing unwillingness to believe that licentious behavior on the part of fathers could be so widespread. His correspondence of the period revealed that he was particularly troubled by awareness of his own incestuous wishes toward his daughter, and by suspicions of his father, who had died recently.
p9-10”
Judith Lewis Herman, Father-Daughter Incest: With a New Afterword

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