Popular Environmental History Books

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Silent Spring Silent Spring (Paperback)
by (shelved 11 times as environmental-history)
avg rating 3.95 — 70,115 ratings — published 1962
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“Contemporary attitudes toward urban parks fall into three levels of sophistication. The first, the most naive assumption, is that parks are just plots of land preserved in their original state. If asked to discuss the issue at all, many laymen have maintained this much, that parks are bits of nature created only in the sense that some decision was made not to build on the land. Many are surprised to learn that parks that an artifact conceived and deliberated as carefully as public buildings, with both physical shape and social usage taken into account. The second, a little more informed, is that parks are aesthetic objects and that their history can be understood in terms of an evolution of artistic styles independent of societal considerations. The third is the view that each of the elements of the urban park represents part of planners' strategy for moral and social reform, so that today, as in the past, the citizen visiting a park is subject to an accumulated set of intended moral lessons.”
Galen Cranz, The Politics of Park Design: A History of Urban Parks in America

“Why did we so consistently look at the West through the sights of a rifle?”
Dan Flores, American Serengeti: The Last Big Animals of the Great Plains

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