Lisa's Reviews > Peter Pan

Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
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it was amazing
bookshelves: children

"You need not be sorry for her. She was one of the kind that likes to grow up. In the end she grew up of her own free will a day quicker than the other girls."

I loved Wendy when I was little - I was a bit over two when I got to know her, so I probably knew I was going to grow up at some point too. And knowing what she chose, it was a deliberate choice in my case as well. Peter Pan is one of those many childhood classics I devoured, loved and cherished, only to put it aside and - seemingly - forget it.

But as I was reading poetry this weekend and enjoying it so much I was laughing tears, I all of a sudden thought of fairies, and that they are made of children's laughter. Laughing like a child made me think of that hidden identity somewhere underneath the grown-up self I have become, and that in turn made me think of the difference between Peter and Wendy.

Peter refuses to grow, and prefers to stay a child and play and fight and live an irresponsible, crazy adventure. His world is a male paradise, and he is its king. As fascinating as it is to follow his story, I would never have wanted to stay in Neverland with him. Telling the story of the adventure to my own children as a grown-up - a mother - would have been much more tempting. Wendy and Peter are symbols of the storyteller and the story.

What would you like to be?

Why are so many people still idealising an immature phase in life, glorifying young adult behaviour, living off the stories of their youth? Telling the story of Captain Hook is so much more satisfying than chasing him around while listening for the crocodile ticking away in all eternity.

I bow to the wisdom and wit of Barrie, who must have had plenty of Peters and Wendys to draw from to create those two concepts of life - so true and yet so much in need of pixie dust.
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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
June 25, 2014 – Shelved
June 25, 2014 – Shelved as: children

Comments Showing 1-9 of 9 (9 new)

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message 1: by Ilse (new)

Ilse Why, a poignant question, Lisa- what is causing nostalgia? Is it a certain longing for a time things seemed simpler? Fortunately, if life might be in want of pixie dust, we can find some in the form of books...


Lisa Ilse wrote: "Why, a poignant question, Lisa- what is causing nostalgia? Is it a certain longing for a time things seemed simpler? Fortunately, if life might be in want of pixie dust, we can find some in the for..."

Precisely what I believe as well! Pixie dust is found inside book jackets...


message 3: by Jan-Maat (new)

Jan-Maat story-teller and story - a good reading I think, but it was thankfully a long time since I read it and I have largely forgotten it!


Lisa Jan-Maat wrote: "story-teller and story - a good reading I think, but it was thankfully a long time since I read it and I have largely forgotten it!"

You never know when the story comes back to visit you, Jan-Maat! Forgotten until remembered.


message 5: by Jan-Maat (new)

Jan-Maat Must you scare me so Lisa? Some things best not revisited.


Lisa Jan-Maat wrote: "Must you scare me so Lisa? Some things best not revisited."

Okay, sorry! Just don't believe in fairies, and you are safe!


message 7: by Jan-Maat (new)

Jan-Maat Lisa wrote: "Jan-Maat wrote: "Must you scare me so Lisa? Some things best not revisited."

Okay, sorry! Just don't believe in fairies, and you are safe!"


I only believe in trolls, and dragons sleeping on hordes of gold ;)


message 8: by Lyn (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lyn Elliott I’ve just started reading Michael Chabon’s ‘Summerland’, where his introduction is all about his belief in the faerie, a remnant of his childhood love of fairy stories. As this transmutes into a story about baseball I probably won’t get very far, but I do connect with the love of so_called fairy stories, no critical examination at all.


Lisa Lyn wrote: "I’ve just started reading Michael Chabon’s ‘Summerland’, where his introduction is all about his belief in the faerie, a remnant of his childhood love of fairy stories. As this transmutes into a st..."

So if I don't believe in baseball, I should probably just read the first part of his book!


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