Lizzy's Reviews > Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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it was amazing
bookshelves: classics-literay-fiction, historical-fiction, read-2016, read-years-ago, stars-5

Just a few words to express how I loved Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. So much has already been said, that I feel almost redundant.

'Pride and Prejudice' for me is above all about women’s choices in marriage, or the possibility of love versus choosing for money or social position. During Austen's time, marriage was the only option a woman had, except if she was rich enough to disregard the expectations of society; except if she was willing to live as a poor relation, which usually meant being used as an unpaid servant. Of course, there was always the option of becoming a governess, but that represented not only miserly wages, even worst it implied becoming barely respectable and existence in an ambiguous class oblivion of social invisibility and no autonomy. What could be worst? Thus, let’s not criticize Austen’s contemporaries who saw marriage as their only choice, let’s even try to understand Mrs. Benet predicament:
”If I can but see one of my daughters happily settled at Netherfield,” said Mrs. Bennet to her husband, “and all the others equally well married, I shall have nothing to wish for.”

But we have to remember that woman’s necessity was not one-sided:
It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

But, alas, that has probably been said before. What else can I mention here? That Jane Austen was ahead of her time, and her heroine, the witty and charming Elizabeth Bennet, makes us fall in love with her by her accurate view of the world:
There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.

And let’s not forget Mr. Darcy, for I am a romantic at heart, and he conquered me with his truthful statement, and even more crucial for me, ended up changing for Elizabeth:
In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

What I most liked about Elizabeth and Darcy’s relationship is that it is not a simple romantic tale, but I loved how they overcome his pride and her prejudice and grow up gradually from a mutual antipathy to an understanding. And that does not happen overnight but over a period of over a year.

All this, and much more if I wished to be even more redundant is what makes this novel so popular and enduring. It was refreshing to have a story that despite questioning prevailing values makes us smile. Highly recommended.
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Reading Progress

April 30, 2014 – Shelved
July 20, 2015 – Shelved as: classics-literay-fiction
March 25, 2016 – Shelved as: historical-fiction
Started Reading
August 30, 2016 – Shelved as: read-2016
August 30, 2016 – Shelved as: read-years-ago
August 30, 2016 – Shelved as: stars-5
August 30, 2016 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-22 of 22 (22 new)

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Lizzy Jean-Paul wrote: "Beautiful review, Lizzy. Delighted to see those five heavenly stars adorning this masterpiece."

I simply couldn't have given it less, Jean-Paul. Thanks. L.


Amalia Gavea Touching and poignant review, Lizzy, for one of the most romantic (and pragmatic at the same time) books ever written.


Lizzy Amalia wrote: "Touching and poignant review, Lizzy, for one of the most romantic (and pragmatic at the same time) books ever written."

You're right, Amalia, Austen's masterpiece is both pragmatic and romantic and that's one of it's major triumphs. I'm glad you liked it, thanks. L.


message 4: by Marita (new) - added it

Marita Very nice, Lizzy! :-)


Renata It's always a pleasure to read an admiring tribute to a favorite novel! It's an opportunity to recall all that i enjoyed and to benefit from another enthusiastic readers insights! Lovely review!


Seemita Ah! Thanks for this delightful review, Lizzy! It got my memories refreshed :)


Sidharth Vardhan It is still contemporary in India. If Austen was born today, she would have been an Indian, given my country's craziness for marriages. There are in fact parts in India, where Elizabeth's rejection of Collins' proposal would surprise people. Backward? I know. Here try this modern day Indian adoption and you will learn a lot about India:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhXdL6I...


Lizzy Marita wrote: "Very nice, Lizzy! :-)"

Thanks, Marita.


Lizzy Renata wrote: "It's always a pleasure to read an admiring tribute to a favorite novel! It's an opportunity to recall all that i enjoyed and to benefit from another enthusiastic readers insights! Lovely review!"

I so enjoy reading reviews of books I loved, Renata. I understand your feelings. Thanks. L.


Lizzy Seemita wrote: "Ah! Thanks for this delightful review, Lizzy! It got my memories refreshed :)"

I am glad you liked it, Seemita. Thanks. L.


Jennifer Beautiful review, Lizzy! I read this earlier this year and just loved it.


message 12: by Lizzy (last edited Nov 28, 2016 07:43AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lizzy Sidharth wrote: "It is still contemporary in India. If Austen was born today, she would have been an Indian, given my country's craziness for marriages. There are in fact parts in India, where Elizabeth's rejection..."

It's interesting and amazing what you tell us about India, Sidharth. Why do you think it is so? But I don't know if Austen today would be such an advocate of marriage for women as a necessity. Things have changed and she would, I imagine, adapt easily to contemporary standards. Unless she lived in India, of course.

Thanks for the link, I'm going to check it out right away, and let you know how I like it. You know I'm always interested in learning about India. L.


Sidharth Vardhan Lizzy wrote: "Sidharth wrote: "It is still contemporary in India. If Austen was born today, she would have been an Indian, given my country's craziness for marriages. There are in fact parts in India, where Eliz..."

I think it is true because in many parts working women are still looked down upon - a trend fast changing. And then, the whole families have a say in marriage not just the couple. To parents, getting their daughter married is still the biggest responsibility. The things are changing are changing for better though


Lizzy Sidharth wrote: "Lizzy wrote: "Sidharth wrote: "It is still contemporary in India. If Austen was born today, she would have been an Indian, given my country's craziness for marriages. There are in fact parts in Ind..."

I'm glad things are changing for the better, Sidharth, but it seems Indian women need a 'feminist Gandhi' to fight for them. L.


message 15: by Lata (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lata I remember how concerned my parents were, when I was 18, at my unmarried state (I still had several years left of university and couldn't understand their panic). Needless to say, the clucking and tutting of my parents' friends didn't help.


Lizzy Lata wrote: "I remember how concerned my parents were, when I was 18, at my unmarried state (I still had several years left of university and couldn't understand their panic). Needless to say, the clucking and ..."

Oh, Lata, I get parents' concerns. As a mother myself, I wanted my children to find someone and be happy. But not always marriage is the answer. Although a life without a family is indeed lonely. So, I also understand the 'panic', but there's so much we can do. Thanks for contributing to our little discussion. L.


message 17: by Biba (new)

Biba Wonderful, I must read this!


Sidharth Vardhan Lizzy wrote: "Sidharth wrote: "Lizzy wrote: "Sidharth wrote: "It is still contemporary in India. If Austen was born today, she would have been an Indian, given my country's craziness for marriages. There are in ..."

I don't think a Gandhi would do much in this case, but a generation or two of them will have to stand against traditions, even in face of undeserved criticism and at great personal cost, the way women in west did in first half of 20th century - and they are already doing it.


Lizzy Jennifer wrote: "Beautiful review, Lizzy! I read this earlier this year and just loved it."

Sorry for not getting back to you sooner, Jeniffer. Nevertheless, I want to thank you for taking the time to read my review and for your kind comment. L.


Lizzy Biba wrote: "Wonderful, I must read this!"

Thanks, Biba. This is not a book to missed. Read it and enjoy. L.


message 21: by Lata (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lata Wonderful review, Lizzie. I'm rereading this book for the 20th time or so and loving it all over again.


Lizzy Lata wrote: "Wonderful review, Lizzie. I'm rereading this book for the 20th time or so and loving it all over again."

I'm glad you enjoyed it. Thanks. L.


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