notgettingenough 's Reviews > Holy Bible: King James Version

Holy Bible by Anonymous
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Mar 02, 2010

it was amazing
bookshelves: sociology


Yeah right. Twilight gets you votes? I think not.

But I have some data on how we die.

From wiki on John von Neumann. Honestly, you must have heard of him, he's just like the most important scientist ever practically.

Von Neumann died a year and a half later, in great pain. While at Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C., he invited a Roman Catholic priest, Father Anselm Strittmatter, O.S.B., to visit him for consultation (a move which shocked some of von Neumann's friends). The priest then administered to him the last Sacraments.


I love the idea his friends were shocked. Doubtless they felt betrayed. But maybe von Neumann was merely being open-minded. Trying the improbable when that's all that's left.

------------------------------------------

My friend Phil has a wife, Belinda. She has a Tshirt she made up which says on it:

I shagged Edward and he lived.

If, like me until a few months ago, you have never heard of Twilight, let me explain. In the story Edward can’t have sex with humans because it would kill them. So, okay, this is funny, right? I hate printed Tshirts, but even I’m tempted by this one…

Just checking here. If I mention Twilight, will I get more votes for my bible discussion?

I’ve been thinking about the bible as a consequence of my father’s dying process, during which he became closer to some of the ideas than he had been for some time.

As one observes in various crises in one’s life, in general we’re willing to try anything. When asked, Peter Cook said he wanted to die like WC Fields: studying the bible, looking for loopholes. While not wishing to doubt there are atheists so strong in their beliefs that they die in a content way, most people, whatever they think they are, when it comes right down to it, will hope like hell (so to speak) that there’s a heaven. Somewhere to go next.

So, in the style of Sherlock Holmes, do we not, having eliminated the impossible, look to the improbable? And the point of Christian belief is that it is about the improbable, but not the impossible. Have you never in your life out of sheer desperation prayed to the God that might, after all, be there listening to you? Or is it only ex-Catholics that do this?

I received a newsletter in the post when I came back from Adelaide soon after my father had died. It discussed him in some detail – as being alive, strange to read – and inter alia said:

I visited Monica and Paul on Australia Day, their 51st wedding anniversary, and took them some Jubilee cake. Paul told me that he had been praying to Mary MacKillop for a miracle. Later that day I returned with Fr Rob Egar who anointed Paul. I saw that as the miracle. Many of you will remember that Monica and Paul left the Church very publicly about 40 years ago, so on-going prayers for them at this difficult time would be much appreciated.


Is that a bit of (referring to Manny’s idea) game-theory, the nun seeing this as a miracle? Is it a bit of game-theory that my father is suddenly praying to saints and desiring blessings, which I might add he is taking from all and sundry? He asked his friend Morris when he came to visit him if he had any good blessings in him. Morris modestly demurred.

Now, my father was a highly intellectual and knowledgeable theologian, a trait which stayed with him, however publicly he left the Church. What I can’t see him as, at any point in his life, is a Christian. I say that from the perspective of having been brought up for ten years or so in a family which was devout. And yet. And yet. I think my father was doing what anybody would when faced with the options. Trying the bloody unlikely when that’s all that’s left.
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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
March 2, 2010 – Shelved
March 2, 2010 – Shelved as: sociology

Comments (showing 1-6 of 6) (6 new)

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message 1: by Nick (new)

Nick Black i've long wanted to write the definitive biography on von Neumann, one of my true heroes! i've even got it on The List:

http://dank.qemfd.net/dankwiki/index....

i'll do it once i'm too old and hoary to cut the mustard as a scientist anymore, and must revert to writing.


notgettingenough Nick wrote: "i've long wanted to write the definitive biography on von Neumann, one of my true heroes! i've even got it on The List:

http://dank.qemfd.net/dankwiki/index....

i'll do it once i'm too old and hoary to cut the mustard as a scientist anymore, and must revert to writing. ..."


So, um. Writing is last resort?

I've looked at the list, and I'm hanging out for the biog.


message 3: by Nick (new)

Nick Black writing isn't a last resort, so much as it is less bound by age.


message 4: by Ian (new)

Ian A beautiful and thoughtful review. Thanks for sharing.


notgettingenough Nick wrote: "writing isn't a last resort, so much as it is less bound by age."

Yes, but you do seem to be implying it isn't rocket science...


Scott Sheaffer A very creative review. Nicely done.


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