Jenny (Reading Envy)'s Reviews > The Bone Clocks

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
68030
's review

it was amazing
bookshelves: own, booker-winners-and-listed, read2014, reading-envy-podcast, location-uk, around-the-world
Recommended to Jenny (Reading Envy) by: David Mitchell

I forced myself not to read more than 100 pages a day so I wouldn't finish this book too quickly. I was happy to see David Mitchell going back to the threaded storylines and fantastical diversions that I loved so much with Cloud Atlas after the historical fiction turn he took in The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet.

The hardback has a beautiful color and silky pages. :)

I'm putting all my thoughts behind a spoiler, in case details ruin your enjoyment of discovery. (view spoiler)

ETA: This article made me want to start from the beginning and read all of Mitchell's books again. There is a chart of characters we've seen before. I missed so many!

Discussed on Episode 012 of the Reading Envy Podcast.
55 likes · flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read The Bone Clocks.
Sign In »

Reading Progress

April 22, 2014 – Shelved
April 22, 2014 – Shelved as: to-read
September 2, 2014 – Started Reading
September 2, 2014 – Shelved as: own
September 2, 2014 – Shelved as: booker-winners-and-listed
September 2, 2014 –
page 97
15.54% "I once compared Mitchell to Murakami but now more than ever."
September 6, 2014 –
page 154
24.68%
September 7, 2014 –
page 206
33.01%
September 7, 2014 –
page 290
46.47% "Has anyone else noted the clocks next to the page numbers? Sometimes the time is stagnant, others it moves more quickly. What does it mean?!??"
September 12, 2014 –
page 498
79.81% "So far I've noticed two characters from previous Mitchell novels. He told me he was doing that!"
September 13, 2014 – Shelved as: read2014
September 13, 2014 – Finished Reading
September 27, 2014 – Shelved as: reading-envy-podcast
December 27, 2014 – Shelved as: location-uk
December 27, 2014 – Shelved as: around-the-world

Comments Showing 1-27 of 27 (27 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

Amanda I definitely see the comparison. I personally struggle more with Murakami than I do Mitchell.


message 2: by Dustin (new) - added it

Dustin Oh wow, I never saw that comparison before..:)


message 3: by Tamahome (new)

Tamahome Finished already?


Jenny (Reading Envy) Tamahome wrote: "Finished already?"
I made myself read other things between sections!


message 5: by Diane (new) - added it

Diane Barnes Wow! 5 stars from you really means something.


Jenny (Reading Envy) Diane wrote: "Wow! 5 stars from you really means something."
I gave five stars to three of the Booker longlist so far. And I don't always care for the books on that list. (Of course, none of my 5-starred books made the shortlist, ah well.)


message 7: by Tamahome (new)

Tamahome The Jenny List.


message 8: by Trish (new) - added it

Trish I'm impressed as heck that someone both understands this guy and can delight in his symbols and intricacies (like the page numbers and clocks). I am quite sure I would still be slogging through the verbiage, thinking, "what?" You have a beautiful mind...


Amanda Love your review! What did you decide about the clocks?


Jenny (Reading Envy) Amanda wrote: "Love your review! What did you decide about the clocks?"

I decided they were moving at the same speed the whole time and I was just noticing them more in certain moments. What do you think? I should do some internet research on it.

By the way, in the weird precognitive nature of fiction, here's a quote from PJE's Booker Blog:
Perhaps the [Booker] judges read Robert Collins' review of The Bone Clocks in The Spectator. He described it as a "merciless, roiling cauldron of third-rate fantasy poppycock."

Sound like Hershey much?


message 11: by Dustin (new) - added it

Dustin I did not view the spoilers, Jenny, but enjoyed your review nevertheless. Thank you for sharing!


Amanda I'm still stunned this didn't make the short list. I never really decided anything about the clocks. I definitely noticed them but not sure there was any hidden meaning. I did a very brief google search and didn't really see anything.


message 13: by Jeff (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jeff Loved the podcast, now can't wait to read this book!


Jenny (Reading Envy) Jeff wrote: "Loved the podcast, now can't wait to read this book!"
Hey thanks!


Cecily I feel diddled that the UK edition doesn't have clocks by the page numbers! It does have a single illustration at the start of each section, though; does yours?


Jenny (Reading Envy) Cecily wrote: "I feel diddled that the UK edition doesn't have clocks by the page numbers! It does have a single illustration at the start of each section, though; does yours?"
No! Why the difference?


Cecily US books, especially paperbacks, are often better quality paper, print and so on, and sometimes titles are changed for clarity (e.g. the first Harry Potter). As for differences in design... who knows?


message 18: by Dustin (new) - added it

Dustin Wow, that's really neat that the US page numbers are represented by clocks!:)


Jenny (Reading Envy) Dustin wrote: "Wow, that's really neat that the US page numbers are represented by clocks!:)"

They just have clocks next to them. I suppose they really must not mean anything if the UK edition doesn't have them!


message 20: by Dustin (new) - added it

Dustin Jenny (Reading Envy) wrote: "Dustin wrote: "Wow, that's really neat that the US page numbers are represented by clocks!:)"

They just have clocks next to them. I suppose they really must not mean anything if the UK edition doe..."


The clocks seem to be a theme of the work.. Not sure why the UK edition didn't incorporate them..


message 21: by Skip (new)

Skip Thanks for the hyperlink. I have been trying to figure out what book of his to read.


Stephanie I noticed the silky pages, too!


Kristie I understand about slowing down the reading of a book I like, but I usually do that closer to the end.


message 24: by Cecily (last edited Nov 03, 2014 08:26AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Cecily Skip wrote: "Thanks for the hyperlink. I have been trying to figure out what book of his to read."

I don't think this is the one to start with. For a start, it's the second of a trilogy, and although it is not a direct continuation of its predecessor (Thousand Autumns), it probably makes sense to read them in sequence.

Personally, I would suggest Ghostwritten or Cloud Atlas: both contain stories linked by migrating souls and other coincidences, and reflect his concerns with power, exploitation and mortality. CA has a distinct structure (six stories, the first five of which stop half way through to move to the next, and then finish off in reverse order), whereas in Ghostwritten the structure is more informal.

But any of his others would be good, too!


message 25: by Skip (new)

Skip Funny you should suggest Ghostwritten, which has been on my Wish List on Barnes & Nobles forever...


Jenny (Reading Envy) Skip wrote: "Funny you should suggest Ghostwritten, which has been on my Wish List on Barnes & Nobles forever..."

It's good, and not as tomey.


Philip If you really want to understand me as a person, you need to read Dessicated Embryos ;-)


back to top